Eric Jarosinski

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Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Assistant Professor of German
Areas of Interest: 
20th-century literature, literary theory, cultural studies
Contact Information
Office Address: 
749 Williams Hall
Email Address: 
ejar@sas.upenn.edu

Prof. Jarosinski's research focuses on Weimar-era literature, culture, and philosophy. Additional interests include visual culture, architecture and design, advertising and consumer culture, social media, and tourism. Recently recognized with the School of Arts and Sciences Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching by an Assistant Professor, Prof. Jarosinski has taught courses on Marx, Nietzsche, Kafka, Thomas Mann, literary theory, the Frankfurt School, German Modernism, modern German theater, postwar German literature, and contemporary German consumer culture.

He is the co-editor, with Mena Mitrano, of The Hand of the Interpreter: Essays on Meaning after Theory and is now completing a book manuscript, Cellophane Modernity, on metaphors of transparency in modern German culture. His most recent book project, Listening to Weimar, examines writings on radio in the Weimar era as implicit theorizations of the spatial dimensions of modern aesthetics and their political instrumentalization. Prof. Jarosinski is the author of several essays that examine the intersections of language, politics, and aesthetics in the work of Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, Siegfried Kracauer, Joseph Roth, and Vladimir Nabokov. Ongoing projects focus on the radio play, the rhetorical construction of Nazi Berlin, Theodor W. Adorno’s American dreams, and the significance of German history in the work of contemporary Dutch authors. In addition, Prof. Jarosinski has been active as a translator, primarily in the fields of Psychoanalysis and Jewish Studies.

In a private capacity, Prof. Jarosinski also writes the popular Twitter feed @NeinQuarterly, a satirical "Compendium of Utopian Negation" whose aphorisms focus on European literature and culture, critical theory, and the German language. His work with social media has been recognized as a highly innovative form of outreach in the humanities and drawn significant international media attention, including features in the following: Public Radio International's The World, the Los Angeles Times, Die Zeit, Der Spiegel, the Süddeutsche Zeitung, The Wall Street Journal, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Der Tagesspiegel, Focus, and Die Presse.

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