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Hortative.

The suffix ԣ laamI treat this suffix as if it were one unit; historically it is probably derived from the verbal noun forms that end in ǧ al plus ޣ aakum `it will become', i.e. ؽԴ + ޣ pookal + aakum `going will become'. Since ޣ aakum is now reduced to ȣ aam and the verbal noun forms in ǧ are rare in ST, I prefer the analysis presented here. is added to the INFINITIVE (cf. § xxx below of the verb. Examples: ؽԴԣ poohalaam `let's go', ԡԣ paakkalaam `let's see'. This form is homophonous with the modal ԣ laam `one may (do something)'. The semantic difference becomes obvious when an answer is given---the affirmative answer to the hortative is sari `all right, okay', while the affirmative answer to the modal is Ⱦԣ aamaam `yes'.

Question:
ؽԴԾ? poohalaamaa? `Shall we go?'
Answer:
sari `Okay, let's.'

Question:
ؽԴԾ? poohalaamaa? `May (I) go?'
Answer:
Ⱦԣ ؽԴԣ aamaam, poohalaam `Yes, you may.'

In the hortative, the addressee is understood as included in the exhortation. Therefore, if used without deleted pronoun, the inclusive 1st person plural Ծ naama must be chosen. If used with the exclusive naanga it cannot mean `let's' but only `one may'. Thus:

Question:
Ծ ؽԴԾ? naama poohalaamaa? `Shall we go?'
Answer:
sari `Okay, let's.'

Question:
ؽԴԾ? naanga poohalaamaa? `Is it all right for us to go, may we go? '
Answer:
Ⱦԣ aamaam `Yes, you may.'



Vasu Renganathan
Sat Nov 2 21:16:08 EST 1996