The Journals of Charles Somers Miller (1858-1943)

Copyright 1991 (Todd A. Kraft) and subsequent versions (Robert A. Kraft)
[conversion to HTML, 22je2004; latest modifications and corrections, 22je2004]

Note that this version of the Journals attempt to retain the original line divisions, to facilitate verification; obvious misspellings are  corrected, with the original noted in brackets; capitalization and punctuation have often been normalized, since CSM's writing style is quite inconsistent on such matters. Subsequent versions will resolve hyphens and ignore original formatting.

For relevant genealogical information, see http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rs/rak/gen/geneal.htm

Transcribed and edited under the direction of Robert A. Kraft, a great grandson of CSM, with Todd A. Kraft, a great-great grandson, who also wrote the following dedications, acknowledgements, and introduction:

To Margaret Miller Northrop Hall, my great-grandmother, who taught me that happiness in life is something that must be pursued.

To Robert Alan Kraft, my father, who taught me that life is a question waiting to be answered.

And to Charles Somers Miller, my great-great-grandfather, who through the following journals has taught me that life's beauty is contained in the simple, daily ebb and tide of events that shape the world through which our lives flow.

Acknowledgements:

I gratefully acknowledge the support of my father, Robert Alan Kraft, who orchestrated and financed the collection and creation of these journals in electronic form.  From him, as well as Howard Russell Kraft and Marian Northrop Kraft, come many of the notes on the Pierpont Family as well as the Miller Family.  In particular, the Pierpont Family Association genealogical records, which were converted to electronic form by Robert Kraft, have been invaluable in identifying many of the individuals mentioned in these journals.

Introduction:

For many years I held my father's interest in family history in mild contempt.  This is not rare, as any parent with teenagers can attest.  Although I have not yet had the pleasure of experiencing the violent eruption that occurs when one's own child reaches into adulthood, and perhaps am no more prepared for the event, even armed with the knowledge of my particular journey into the majority, I am better prepared to satisfy the hungry void that will cry out into the night "Who Am I?"  What I then percieved as sentimentalism on the part of my father, I now recognize as an honest attempt to understand the historical, social, and religious contexts from which he came.

As Charles Miller so aptly states "I have but little to write about, but must write something for practice as it is hard for me to write good, so I write a little every day" (10/09/1899).

Todd Alan Kraft                                                                                                                  December 19, 1991

---

Work Record Pocket Diaries of  Charles Somers Miller
[these small books, through 1890, contain mostly notes on hours worked per day, with some sketches and addresses, etc.; we have transcribed the most significant content. The Journals proper start in 1891, although 1890 provides somewhat of a transition.]     

1876

01\01\1876(Sa) Worked at Benedict & Burnham's 4 1/2 hours.
01\07\1876(Fr) Went to West Haven.
02\04\1876(Fr) First sleighing of the season.
02\07\1876(Mo) Sleighing all gone.
02\14\1876(Mo) Paid for my paper.
02\28\1876(Mo) More sleighing.
02\29\1876(Tu) Good sleighing; snowed about 1 1/2 inches thick.
03\03\1876(Fr) Sleighing all gone.
03\11\1876(Sa) Paid for paper.
03\29\1876(We) Water so high in the river we could not work.
05\10\1876(We) 130 thousand people at the exhibition at Philadelphia.
Centennial opens to day.
05\11\1876(Th) P. T. Barnum's great show here to day.
35 thousand people at the centen{n}ial.
05\13\1876(Sa) Went to Litchfield.
05\14\1876(Su) Returned from Litchfield.
06\10\1876(Sa) Went to Litchfield.
06\11\1876(Su) Came home from Litchfield.
06\25\1876(Su) A storm of hailstones occur{r}ed to day, the stones
about the size of walnuts.
06\27\1876(Tu) Staid home to hay it.
07\04\1876(Tu) [see separate entry]
07\08\1876(Sa) Was home sick.
07\15\1876(Sa) Went to Litchfield.
07\16\1876(Su) Came home.
08\12\1876(Sa) No water. [Other Sat entries often "No work"]
08\26\1876(Sa) No water.
09\02\1876(Sa) No water.
09\18\1876(Mo) Went to the Centen{n}ial.
09\23\1876(Sa) Came home from the Centen{n}ial.
10\15\1876(Su) About three inches of snow fell this morning.
12\04\1876(Mo) Enlisted in Company A, 2nd Reg't C.N.Y.{? C.N.J/G.}

Financial records and summaries at the end.

1877

01\20\1877(Sa) Went to Litchfield.
01\29\1877(Mo) Rev. Jacob L. Clark buried to day, age 70 years.
04\02\1877(Mo) Grand Mother {Miller} died to day. Mrs. Timothy Miller.
Betsy Stannard, Litchfield.
04\03\1877(Tu) Grand Mother {Miller} buried to day. See Oct. 18.
06\17\1877(Su) Went to Litchfield.
06\24\1877(Su) {Why here??}
Frank H. Miller. Age 21 years Oct 21st.
Charles S. Miller. Age 18 years Sept 27th. {b 1858; going on 19}
Mary A. Miller. Age 15 years July 3rd.
Carrie A. Miller. Age 14{?} July 23rd.
Fred D. Miller. Age 13 years Oct 15th.
Ivan A. Miller. Age 3 years Sept 2nd.
07\19\1877(Th) Went to Trinity Church picnic at highrock grove.
08\01\1877(We) Went to coney island.
09\14\1877(Fr) Got Mary's organ to day at Briggs & Smith.
10\12\1877(Fr) Joined the Good Tenplers {sic} in Wolcott.
10\18\1877(Th) Grand Mother Somers died to day.
10\28\1877(Su) Went to Litchfield.

Financial records and summaries at the end.

1878

[some purchase of fife and drum equipment also]

04\28\1878(Su) Went to Litchfield.
12\11\1878(We) The river was so high, we could not word{sic work?}.
The Naugatuck was about 14 feet above low water mark and the
Seymour rail road bridge was taken away.

Financial records and summaries at the end.

1879

02\05\1879(We) Went home sick. Worked 1 hr.
03\01\1879(Sa) Sick.
03\27\1879(Th) Hired out to work for David Porter to day.
03\31\1879(Mo) Worked for David G. Porter to day. In the forenoon
chopp{{i}}ed near the Brass mill pond; in the afternoon
tore paper in the little house on the plank road.
04\01\1879(Tu) Worked this forenoon tairing paper of{f} the walls
of the house on plank road and chopping alond{sic, along?}
the same road in the afternoon. [Then purchases.]
04\02\1879(We) Worked at joiner work this forenoon. Helped Lester
draw wood this afternoon. {*Paid my board}
04\03\1879(Th) Worked at joiner work this forenoon and chopped
after dinner.
04\04\1879(Fr) Worked this forenoon {moving} straw from the east barn to
the west; in the afternoon moved straw up on the loft and
drew wood from the swamp near the pond untill old De Hoor{?}
broke his hoof.
04\05\1879(Sa) Worked to day chopping wood at the door.{?}
Lester and Mr. Porter went to Mrs. Todd's funeral.
04\07\1879(Mo) Worked this forenoon making a bookkase{?} and
chopped north of the plank road in the afternoon.
04\08\1879(Tu) Worked chopping on the north side of the plank road.
Paid my board. [very large, scrawly hand!]
04\09\1879(We) Drew wood in the forenoon and worked at Joiner work
in the afternoon.
04\10\1879(Th) Worked around the little house on the plank road.
04\11\1879(Fr) F{r}ost.{?} Worked at joiner work, hung a grindstone.
04\12\1879(Sa) Fixed the picket fence in front of the little house
on the plank road and then chopped wood at the door, then
buried a calf, then drew wood, then threw wood into the
wood house.
04\14\1879(Mo) Got out manure and much{muck?}.
04\15\1879(Tu) Carted muck{?} out, built fence nerast{sic} the
brook and fixed hay cutter.
@Not paid my board.
04\16\1879(We) Knocked dung in the meadow{?} back of the barn and
drew wood.
04\17\1879(Th) Cut hay and fixed wagon.
04\18\1879(Fr) Worked fixing a old{?} wagon and cleaning out the
{*a} wagon house.
04\19\1879(Sa) Did not work.
04\22\1879(Tu) Not paid my board.
04\23\1879(We) Made a fire bord {sic} and spread muck and carted muck.
Plea{sa}nt day.
04\24\1879(Th) Drove team for Leter to plow over by Mr. Lakes.
A very ple{a}sant day.
And {erased?} saw Dr. Swift in the afternoon and went up to
the Che{st}nut Hill reserway {sic}.
04\25\1879(Fr) Made flower beds and plained sticks for grape arbors.
Fair day.
04\26\1879(Sa) Carted muck and transplanted rheubarb.
Fair day.
04\28\1879(Mo) Planted potatoes.
A nice shower in the afternoon.
04\29\1879(Tu) Spread muck on the hill m{e}adow and fixed the fence
up to scruboak. |Fair day. |Not paid my board.
04\30\1879(We) Planted potatoes over by Lakes. |Ple{a}sant day.
05\01\1879(Th) Planted potatoes. |A very ple{a}sant day.
Paid my board. |Received 40 dollars. ...|Paid my board up to
next Saturday night.
05\02\1879(Fr) Planted potatoes in the forenoon and plained the stuff
for the grape arbor in the afternoon. |Plesant day.
05\03\1879(Sa) Fixed fence near the dry bridge and plowed Mr. Ashton's
garden. |Plesant day.
05\05\1879(Mo) Set out apple trees and grape vines and sparaaron{?}.
A very plesant day.
05\05\1879(Tu)-05\10\1879(Sa) Worked. {etc. in later passages}
05\12\1879(Mo) Worked in the garden. |P. T. Barnum's show in town
to day.
05\13\1879(Tu) Worked in the garden. |Lester got through to day.
05\16\1879(Fr) Worked in the garden. |Had old home shoes set over {.75}.
05\17\1879(Sa) Worked plowing on the hill in the forenoon and
harrowing in the afternoon.
05\29\1879(Th) Planted carrots on the hill.
05\30\1879(Fr) Planted carrots on the hill.
05\31\1879(Sa) Worked planting carrots on the hill.
Paid my board up untill to night.
06\12\1879(Th) Worked. |Mr. Porter went to New York.
06\13\1879(Fr) Worked. |Broke the wagon wheel to ...{?}.
06\30\1879(Mo) Worked one half day. |Mary graguated {sic} to day.
Commencde {sic?} loging{sic?} to day.
07\04\1879(Fr) Went to New Haven to day to the celebration.
07\05\1879(Sa) Paid up my board untill to night.
07\15\1879(Tu) Worked. |Received $20.00 to day leaving 2.89 to go
on next month.
07\22\1879(Tu) Worked. |Ledo {sic?} away the white cow.
07\24\1879(Th) Worked 1/2 day. |Went to Trinity picnic.
08\02\1879(Sa) Worked. |Paid my board up to night $20.00 (15.36 more due).
09\10\1879(We) Weth{sic Went} to Wolcottville {sic} and drum{m}ed
for the dedication of the Souldiers {sic} Monument.
09\16\1879(Tu) Drum{m}ed to day at the fair.
09\17\1879(We) Drum{m}ed at Hartford to day.
10\02\1879(Th) Hued{sic} timber for my shop.
10\07\1879(Tu) Went to Harwington to the fair to drum.
10\15\1879(We) Went to Wolcott to drum to day at the fair.
10\25\1879(Sa) Worked. |Paid my board up to night.
10\27\1879(Mo) Worked on my shop.
10\28\1879(Tu) Worked for Wm Pratt.
11\01\1879(Sa) Shingled my shop.
11\05\1879(We) Werked{sic}. |Finished shingling my shop.
11\20\1879(Th) Went to Litchfield.
11\21\1879(Fr) Went to Goshen.
11\22\1879(Sa) Came home to day. |Paid my board up to night.
11\24\1879(Mo) Worked. Bought a pair of bellows and tyure{sic}
iron for $11.50 of Cha's Allen.
12\09\1879(Tu) Built the chimney to my shop.
12\15\1879(Mo) Set my o....{??} block.
12\22\1879(Mo) {{*Werked}} In my shop.
12\23\1879(Tu) Fixed Ediu {?} Todd's sleigh.

[Omitted various addresses and purchases, references to "worked"]
Some summaries and financial records at end

Work Record Pocket Diary 1887

Time Table for Board or Labor preceding Daily Memoranda

1887

01\01\{1887}(Sa) Amount due Spenser Monroe 29.34
01\15\{1887}(Sa) An account of expenses due/paid to Spenser Monroe
01\16\{1887}(Su) Fred M. Drew
Ansonia{?}
Get{?} 25 1886
(something pretty incomprehensible) then 2.50
01\27\{1887}(Th) Lawn{?} List
Shaf 5.00
lorrigh{?}.10
b S 3.30
____
8.40
02\01\{1887}(Tu)-02\02\{1887}(We) List of lumber ordered with measures and
prices.
02\16\{1887}(We) Lake 2 strips 3' 7" long
02\18\{1887}(Fr) Paid Harris that 10.00 (or 1000) on weekend.
02\24\{1887}(Th) James Parter gave district note for 2 man the{?}
$250.00
03\05\{1887}(Sa) Fair. Recieved of George Chandler $2.00 on account,
2.00 balance left.
03\07\{1887}(Mo) Huled(hauled?or hued- hewed) 120 ft. of timber for shop.
03\08\{1887}(Tu) Had Wilson{{s}} Pi{e}rpont team 4 hr. this forenoon
drawing logs from Henry Wedges. Worked
huling(hauling? or huing- hewing) timber for shop
hued (hewed) 132 ft.
03\09\{1887}(We) Pleasant. Hued (hewed) 149 ft. of timber.
03\10\{1887}(Th) Rainy. Hued (hewed) 68 ft.
03\11\{1887}(Fr) Windy. Hued 75 ft. Reci{e}ved of A.E.Chandy{?} 8.50
pay to date. Baught (bought) of JH Gurnesy{?} 2 nail
hammers 1.25.(page ends with calculations)
03\12\{1887}(Sa) Fair. (Figures for Henry Wedge timber and John
Delaney lumber)
03\14\{1887}(Mo) Cool. Wm. Purdy drew 2 loads of lumber for shop.
Reci{e}ved $5.00 on account of Dennis Peck.
Wm. Purdy drew one load of 3 by 4 stuff from Nor{?}
Benhams in Jan. Worked full time.
03\15\{1887}(Tu) Cold. Bought of E.E. Wright 2800 bricks @ 2.00 per
1000 Wilson drew 1 load to Gafney's.
03\16\{1887}(We) Cold. Wm. Purdy drew 5 loads of lumber to day.
Ordered 200 ft. of 1 1/2 spruce plank to day, 10 ft.
Mr. Pryer paid $3.75 for shafts and whiffletree.
03\17\{1887}(Th) Mr. Purdy drew 2 loads of lumber. Ordered of John
Gurnesey (list). Mr. Rockwood lettered Morgan{'}s wagon.
Worked fraining {?} shop.
03\19\{1887}(Sa) Fair. Worked on shop.
03\20\{1887}(Su) Clear,warm. Mary and Gussy were thrown from Frank{'}s
wagon at the chaple and afterwards Frank and Gussy were thrown
out on the plank road near Wilson's.
03\21\{1887}(Mo) Wilson drew wood from south woods.
03\23\{1887}(We) Sold Ed Scott 183 ft. of white oak plank and plank 7
ft. long 10 in wide 3" thick= 15'-2".
03\24\{1887}(Th) Paid Milan {?} Northrope $1000 to pay for Belting.
Bought a watter{water?} Seatt(or Scatt). Paid Farrell Faundry
$10.15 to pay for truck wheels.
03\25\{1887}(Fr) Cold. Paid Nor{?} Morris 250 for Wm Durkee.
03\26\{1887}(Sa) Clear, cold. Recieved of Elias S. Miller $70.00 pay
for services rendered.Eoal{?} Farius School Dist.
Raitharius{?} A. Perkins.Reci{e}ved of DL Sammeris {?} $20.00
Panalils{?}.
03\28\{1887}(Mo) Bought of M. Loannis{?} of Pine Meadow one drum
stuff{?} for $5.00. The town commenced cutting the hill down
to day.
03\29\{1887}(Tu) Very cold. Worked on shop frame.
03\30\{1887}(We) Raised Shop to day.
03\31\{1887}(Th) Bargained of A.B.P. for one horse 12 years, Price
75.00. (Jack? {sic} drowned in Brass Mill Pond- 1898? {sic})
04\01\{1887}(Fr) W. G. Brooks, Bethel. Vt.
04\02\{1887}(Sa) Dick Morgans curshan (or cursham?) 3' 7" by 14 1/2.
Spenser did not work, went to Cogswells.
04\04\{1887}(Mo) Commenced tareing (tearing?) the shop down.
04\05\{1887}(Tu) George Moss brought 230 ft. of oak stripe 5" wide and
8 ft. long. The old high way barrude{?} that my shop has stood on
are in a direct range of the center of James Porter's and the
shear Co chimneye (chimney) the line crossing the tower also in
line at right angles facing the east end of Father's barn and
striking 3 ft. west of a large rock at the south end of the
woods.
04\06\{1887}(We) Worked moving my shop.
04\07\{1887}(Th) Spenser Monroe's brother died to day. A.B. Pierponts
act against Spenser Monroe for Mar 6.92. Spenser did not work
this afternoon.
04\08\{1887}(Fr) David Prichards act $6.05, E.A.Benham $48.88.(the
rest is a list of measures)
04\09\{1887}(Sa) spenser did not work.
04\11\{1887}(Mo) Worked on new shop.
04\12\{1887}(Tu) James Porter and I searched the rec{{k}}ords. At a
special meeting of the School Society of Waterbury at
Gathrie{?} Hall on the 20th day of April 1846 in persuance of
warming{?}. Elias Cook was chosen Moderator and Willard Spenser
Clerk (Pro) {sic}. Voted that the bounds lines of the East
Farms District be altered in the following manner.(Near){?}
(the descriptions continue on the next page 04\13)
04\13\{1887}(We) Wm Shannan died to day at noon. (continuation of
previous description) Beginning at the Cheshire Line in the road
leading from Waterbury to Cheshire thense {?} westerly in the
line of Sch{?} Roads about 60 rods to the north Branch of the
Beaver Pond Brook. Then Northly to Wolcott Line on the west
side of the road leading from Wolcott to Cheshire where it
crosses the Meridian Turnpike Roads, there Easterly in the line
of Wolcott to Cheshire line.(continued on next page 04\14)
04\14\{1887}(Th) Drum Corps{e} met at Fred's to practice. (continuation)
Then in Cheshire line to place of Beginning. Voted that all that
part of the East Farms Dist. lying nirnt{?} in the above described
lines be annexed to the South Distric{sic} in the town of Wolcott.
Voted to d{i}ssolve this meeting.(Attest) William Spenser Clerk
Pro Tem{?}
04\15\{1887}(Fr) The above is a Copy of the Records @ Proceedings of
said meeting as handed to me by Willard Spenser under his hands
as Clerk Pro Tem{?} Alter{?} L. P. Bryan, Clerk. (nothing else
on the page however)
04\16\{1887}(Sa) Reci{e}ved of E.E. Wright $5.00
04\18\{1887}(Mo) Benhams 2 men worked 3 1/2 hr. Spenser worked 3 1/2
Snow fell 6 in deep to day. Very Cold.
04\19\{1887}(Tu) Jim worked. Spenser 8 hr.
04\20\{1887}(We) 2 of Benhams men worked to day.
04\21\{1887}(Th) 2 of Benhams men worked to day.{sic}
04\22\{1887}(Fr) 2 of Benhams men worked. Hotchkiss worked 4 hr.
Soandland{?} worke 2 hr.
04\23\{1887}(Sa) 2 of Benhams men worked. Hotchkiss worked 4 hr.
04\24\{1887}(Su) Feb{?} Mailthrop M.
F{?}hae " " M.
Ha L Tetkins{?}
Michael Donovan
Jerry "
Benjamin Fourclaigh
Harry "
Wm Pritchard
Geo Harrison
Arthur "
Georg{e} Plantsville
Cha's Tuttle
Wm Slatten
" Somers Ordered 200 ft. of 1 1/2 spruce plank to day 10 ft.
H.A. Norton
Cha's Yarclaigh
C.S. Miller
H. Dethuns{?}
04\25\{1887}(Mo) 2 of Benhams men worked. Shingled Shop.
04\26\{1887}(Tu) Spenser worked 1/2 day.
04\27\{1887}(We) 1 of Benhams men worked (Jim).
04\28\{1887}(Th) 2 of Benhams men worked. Spenser did not work.
Hitchkess worked 9 hr.
04\29\{1887}(Fr) 2 of Benhams men worked. Hotchkiss worked 9 hrs.
04\30\{1887}(Sa) 2 of Benhams men worked. Spenser worked 1/2 day.
Reci{e}ved 10.00 of Austin. Hotchkiss worked 5 hr.
05\02\{1887}(Mo) Hotchkiss worked 1 day 10 hr. A.B. Pierponts actt
8.60 Spenser Monroe.
05\03\{1887}(Tu) Jim worked 5 hr. Hotchkiss worked 9 hr.
05\04\{1887}(We) Jim worked 10 hr.
05\05\{1887}(Th) Jim worked 10 hr. Hotchkiss worked 10 hr.
05\06\{1887}(Fr) Jim worked 10 hr. (calculations below) Hotchkiss
worked 10 hr. payable first Monday in June{?}. Meeting called
to Order 90 shad{?} in persuance of wanng{?} James Warner
chosen Moderator C.S. Miller clerk Pro. BOB South piece
of woods 8 a 2 R 35{?}
05\07\{1887}(Sa) Jim worked{{e}} Hotchkiss worked 6 hr. Wolcott Drum
Band meet to night and {?}oponed(postponed?) of Corps property.
05\08\{1887}(Su) on the list of 1886. Voted to pay at tax if 15 1/2 on
a dollar Payable the Sixth day of June 1887. Voted to dissolve
this meeting.
05\09\{1887}(Mo) Jim worked 10 hr.
05\10\{1887}(Tu) Jim worked 10 hr. Morgan paid for wagon $19.00.
05\11\{1887}(We) Jim worked 10 hr.
05\12\{1887}(Th) (page of names and calculations)
05\13\{1887}(Fr) D.C. had a sociable in my shop, about 100 Present.
05\14\{1887}(Sa) Bought 1/2 ton of coal of Miller and trickland, price
$3.65. Ordered of the City Lumber and Coal Co. 700 ft. of
spruce boards, 4 planks 1 1/2 by 12" 12' long. 24=1 1/4 planks
3'long 10" wide. Wm Girlley 2 pieces of pipeline .20 cts.
05\16\{1887}(Mo) Commenced working in new shop to day seeting lines
for M. Bryan 2.00. Ed Holmes .40 ct. Alexander Bloamfield
shot Warren Frost and then shot himself. (gun is in Museum
M Hall- `43).
05\17\{1887}(Tu) Trusks 2' 3" made 2' 3" {?} (calculations)
05\20\{1887}(Fr) Jim worked.
05\21\{1887}(Sa) Jim worked. Recieved of Miles Farrell 12.00 pay for cartwheels.
05\23\{1887}(Mo) One of Benham's men worked 1/2 day.
05\25\{1887}(We) One of Benhams men worked 9 hr. Wm Grilley br By Pail and dipper
.35 cts.
05\26\{1887}(Th) 2 of Benhams men worked 1/2 day, one apprentice{?}.
James Parter let me have 500.
05\27\{1887}(Fr) 2 of Benhams men worked 10 hr., one apprentice. Had
shop insured 800.
05\28\{1887}(Sa) 2 of Benhams men, one apprentice.
05\30\{1887}(Mo) Decoration Day. Horse came to day. Jack? -chestnut -
black mane and tail, with a western brand (diagram)
05\31\{1887}(Tu) 2 of Benhams men worked (one apprentice). The Berlin
Iron Bridge Co. (calculations).
06\01\{1887}(We) W.D. Stryker H{?} Co., 201 Grand St., N.Y.
06\02\\{1887}(Th) One of Benhams men worked. O.G. Larchild {?for next
word}
06\03\{1887}(Fr) 2 of Benhams men worked (1 apprentice).
06\06\{1887}(Mo) Spenser did not work. Reci{e}ved of Frank Judd 10.00
on adat{?}.
06\07\{1887}(Tu) (measures) Reci{e}ved of S.L. Munson $5.00 (then a
diagram)
06\09\{1887}(Th) (calculations)
06\11\{1887}(Sa) Oct. 30 Teachers Salery (salary) (calculations
beneath) Wm Purdy drew Engine from Southington.
06\12\{1887}(Su) 1886 Oct. 30 by cash (calculations beneath)
06\13\{1887}(Mo) Recieved of Frank Judd 15.00 on account.
06\15\{1887}(We) Robert Wiltars{?} buy hahe{?} wheels (calculations
beneath)
06\17\{1887}(Fr) Went to New Haven to day to drum for the dedication
of the Sauldiers {soldier's?} Monument. 21 men furnidid{?}
-East Rock-
06\20\{1887}(Mo) (listing of accounts for customers)
06\28\{1887}(Tu) 6 tight truck, 7' long, 24" mid, fist {? for next
word) truck to be done in ten days, 65.00.
06\29\{1887}(We) Had fuhukey{?} same at Mayd{?} Smithe 50 cts. 1/2 hr.
Got 3 pulley of Walter Scott 1-12", 1-16", 1-9 1/2". 1 piece of
shafting 4" long with suplin{?} on an end. (calculations
beneath) Oscar Fairchild came to day. Oscar Fairchild came to
board today.
06\30\{1887}(Th) Wm. E. Hustin Buy Aut{?} Bill $10.00. Greely Aut 70
cts. my due.
07\12\{1887}(Tu) M. Rockwood No. 136 N{?}fainsly.
07\14\{1887}(Th) (listing of order to/from Randolph B. Clows and
measures)
07\18\{1887}(Mo) Mr. Fairchild came to day.
07\23\{1887}(Sa) (calculation) Johnson's bill 3.67. Paid Cha's Clark
196.33 for Engine. 100. bill Waterbury National.
07\25\{1887}(Mo) Baught of Clark Bros Mill Dale a lot of washers for
1.50, paid 1.00.
07\26\{1887}(Tu) John Northrop painted our shop.
07\27\{1887}(We) Clyde taken sick. Doctor came.
07\28\{1887}(Th) Doctor came.
07\29\{1887}(Fr) Doctor came.
07\31\{1887}(Sa) Doctor came.
08\01\{1887}(Mo) Doctor came.
08\02\{1887}(Tu) Doctor came. John Northrop painted on shop.
08\03\{1887}(We) Spenser Monroe act 7.07 for July, for June 7.34, for
May 5.48.
08\04\{1887}(Th) Doctor came.
George Edwards
Fred Miller
Cha's Miller
Robert Spenser
Spruce
Chas Fenton
(calculations below)
08\05\{1887}(Fr) Northrop painted shop, balance due him 10.30.
08\07\{1887}(Su) Doctor came.
08\08\{1887}(Mo) Ed Holmes worked. Bill 8.50.
08\11\{1887}(Th) Buckingham
Fred Miller
Roalik{?}
Lewis
Cross {Crass?}
Somers
Cha's Miller
Buyers
08\12\{1887}(Fr) Bauch{?} of dues. Fed{?} pay on said table for 12.00.
32 ft of 4" leather {?for next word} for $7.00. One 12" saw
2.00.
08\13\{1887}(Sa) Reci{e}ved of D.G. Porter $15.00. J.{?} A. Spenser br
by 1 bag oats, 1 saw{?} $2.70.
08\16\{1887}(Tu) William left to day.
08\18\{1887}(Th) Edward
Spruce
Crass
Boath (Booth?)
Wright
Lenor's
Miller
Smith
Hordoy
Clark
Miernam{?}
08\19\{1887}(Fr) Caris Frost worked laying floor for engine.
08\20\{1887}(Sa) Frost worked. Spenser went to Seaside Park.
08\23\{1887}(Tu) Frost worked
08\22\{1887}(Mo) Frost worked.
09\03\{1887}(Sa) (list of accounts with continuation on next page)
09\04\{1887}(Su) (same list)
09\06\{1887}(Tu) Yardan
Barton
Spinner
Boaths
Lents{?}
Buyers
Lenoir{?}
M. Miller
Cauley{?}
Cross
Miller
Old Mr. Fairchild cam{sic} to board to day @ 4.00.
09\08\{1887}(Th) Fire Parade. Did not work this afternoon. Fire
Parade.
09\13\{1887}(Tu) Clark
Wright
Booth
Spruce
Barton (this is the probably the right list)
Edwards
Buyers
Norton
Somers
Cross
Lewis

09\14\{1887}(We) J. H. Somers Wheels (then measures)
09\15\{1887}(Th) Old man Fairchild worked chopping wood to day.
09\17\{1887}(Sa) Fairchild worked 1/4 day.
09\19\{1887}(Mo) Spenser went to Kent to day.
09\20\{1887}(Tu) Paid Mr. Blakewell{?} 10.00
Farrell Faundrys 29.04
City Lumber and Coal Co. 29.53
10\01\{1887}(Sa) Oscar left boarding to day.
10\02\{1887}(Su) Joe came to see horse.
10\03\{1887}(Mo) William Miller came to work and to board to day at
3.50 per week. Frank moved from Wrights to day. Oscar moved
from Ansonia to day into Wrights house.
10\04\{1887}(Tu) Spenser Monroe bill for Sept. 8.91.
10\07\{1887}(Fr) Mr. Fairchild help dig Patalaes{?} this forenoon.
10\11\{1887}(Tu) Barton
Booth
Fanton
Cross
F. Miller
Smith
Lewis
Somers
Buckingham
Edwards
10\19\{1887}(We) Robert Welton bought axle of Goodmin.
10\24\{1887}(Mo) Mr Payne let me have $10.00 on account.
10\25\{1887}(Tu) James Sutton bought 4 cider barrels.
10\26\{1887}(We) Oscar Fairchild went selling rings to Bristol. Wright
took the white horse away.
10\29\{1887}(Sa) H.W. Lakes bill 8.24. Spenser worked 1/4 day. Paid
Spenser 5.00.
10\31\{1887}(Mo) Visited school to day.
11\01\{1887}(Tu) H.W.Lakes carriage came to day.
11\03\{1887}(Th) Monroes bill $13.28 to A.P.P.
11\04\{1887}(Fr) Gave bar 1.50 change from door.
11\14\{1887}(Mo) Spenser worked 1/2 day. Owe Wm. for 3 weeks.
11\16\{1887}(We) Henry Carter saw me to day about the pay for the
band.
11\18\{1887}(Fr) John Delaney bill $6.36.
11\19\{1887}(Sa) Paid Spenser 7.00.
11\20\{1887}(Su) (Measures and price for a "driver pulley" and saw)
11\21\{1887}(Mo) Spenser Monroe did not work. Went to Bristol to buy
saw this forenoon.
11\23\{1887}(We) Spenser worked this forenoon.
11\26\{1887}(Sa) Spenser did not work.
11\28\{1887}(Mo) Spenser worker{sic} nine hours.
11\30\{1887}(We) (measures and diagram)
12\01\{1887}(Th) Paid M. Welton. Drum Corps Note{?}.
12\02\{1887}(Fr) (listing of accounts) Paid Will 5.00.
12\03\{1887}(Sa) 5 weeks pay due Will to night, less 5.00 due 12.50.
12\10\{1887}(Sa) Mr. Frost worked 8 hr. Turned counter shafts. Paid
Spenser 4.75.
12\12\{1887}(Mo) Spenser worked 4 hr. Mr. Frost worked 7 hr. Bored out
sollars{?} and pulleys.
12\14\{1887}(We) Mr. Frost worked 7 hr.
12\15\{1887}(Th) Paid L.L. Eusworth $70.00. Mr. Frost worked 7 hr.
12\16\{1887}(Fr) Paid Wallace{?} Northrop $5.00. Mr. Frost worked 7
hr.
12\17\{1887}(Sa) Reci{e}ved of H.M. Geake 5.00 on account. Paid
Spenser $5.00. Mr. Frost worked 7 hr. Paid Wm. Miller 12.00.
12\19\{1887}(Mo) Paid Wm. Miller 5.00.
12\21\{1887}(We) (measures and diagram)
12\22\{1887}(Th) (measures and diagram)
12\23\{1887}(Fr) (measures con't)
12\24\{1887}(Sa) Wm. Purdus wood came 5.66.
12\26\{1887}(Mo) Christmas
12\31\{1887}(Sa) Paid Spenser 500{5.00?}


Cash Account in the back with a few names and figures. The
rest (expenses, notes and bills, etc.) is blank.

In the back compartment, there are three IOU notes and a slip
of paper with calculations of accounts on it.

The Standard Diary
1888

Preceded by an 1888 Calendar and Almanac section. Both the
front and back covers have calculations written in pencil on
them; the front has "Cha's S. Miller, Waterbury, Conn."
written in pencil.


01\15\{1888}(Su) Used 35 gals of oil from 49 1/2 gal tanks.
03\02\{1888}(Fr) Spenser filed D.G. Partners saw for .50.
03\04\{1888}(Su) Spenser came home from Beacon Falls this fore noon.
Worked afternoon.
03\06\{1888}(Tu) Commensed{sic] taking milk of Wilson.
03\08\{1888}(Th) (listing of accounts) Schwegal let S. Monroe have
the Cha's Monroe place for 8.00 per month.
03\07\{1888}(Fr) Paid School Teacher $64.00.
03\12\{1888}(Mo) Snowed all day and night.
03\13\{1888}(Tu) Snowed all day.
03\14\{1888}(We) Snow 3 ft deep an leavel{sic} and drifts as high as
20 feet all rail road trains stoped{sic}.
03\15\{1888}(Th) Spenser worked.
03\16\{1888}(Fr) Spenser worked. (listing of supplies)
03\17\{1888}(Sa) (measures of wagon to be made, with diagram)
03\18\{1888}(Su) (diagram con't) Wm Miller got through working to day.
03\19\{1888}(Mo) (supply list)
03\21\{1888}(We) Reci{e}ved of C.S. Miller $41.56 Payment in full to
date (followed by signature)
03\22\{1888}(Fr) Hattie Pierpont came home from {?}alafornig{?}
04\15\{1888}(Su) (listing of accounts)
04\18\{1888}(We) (listing of accounts)
04\24\{1888}(We) Reci{e}ved of C.S. Miller 14.15 payment in full to
date (signature? by Wm Durkee)
05\10(10-11)\{1888} C.S.Miller, Piman{?} Smith, Ed Smith, Somers,
Clark, Marram{?}, Kilbaum{?}, Boath, Cross, Edwards.
05\22\{1888}(Tu) Ed Johnson buried to day. Spenser worked 4 hr.
05\24\{1888}(Th) Stock holders train run over the Meridan Waterbury
and Com{?} River railroad Run from waterbury{sic} to Meriden in 45 minutes.
05\27\{1888}(Tu) (someone else's handwriting) Charles F. Wayner,
Westfield, Mass.
06\07\{1888}(Th) (listing of accounts)
06\08\{1888}(Fr) Ed Holmes Plowing{?} Rifle (figures)
06\21\{1888}(Th) H.W. Lakes bill 14.49.
06\24\{1888}(Su) Drove to west Haven and oyster river with Clyde and
Mary. Very warm.
06\26\{1888}(Tu) Ben Harrison nominated for President and for vice
President. S. Monroe worked this fore noon.
06\27\{1888}(We) Iron body from Trucks made for Randolf and Caloms
(measures) Mr. F. L. Adams, H.B.O.H.
06\28\{1888}(Th) H.B.O.H. ordered (list)
(One loose page with accounts on it)
07\05\{1888}(Th) (list of supplies)
07\06\{1888}(Fr) Give Mr. Bradley reci{e}pt for booth{?} money and
indu{?for rest of word}
07\09\{1888}(Mo) First trains run on the Meridan Waterbury and Comm
River Rain road.
07\11\{1888}(We) {? for this entry}
07\12\{1888}(Th) Judd and Judsons (measures and diagram )
07\13\{1888}(Fr) (measures con't)
07\20\{1888}(Fr) (measures)
07\21\{1888}(Sa) Father and I went to Cheshire to day on the New rail
road.
07\22\{1888}(Su) (diagram)
07\25\{1888}(We) Spenser worked 1/2 day.
07\26\{1888}(Th) (diagram and measures for wagon)
07\27\{1888}(Fr) (measures con't)
07\31\{1888}(Tu) Tawns discount{?} $9.60.
08\01\{1888}(We) Saw Mr. Fardon this noon at Scovills. Promised to
meet me at PO 7 o'clock next tuesday{sic} evening.
08\09\{1888}(Th) Went to Bridgeport to foresters parade.
08\10\{1888}(Fr) Mathan. Merwin.
08\11\{1888}(Sa) Judd and Judson ordered wagon 1 1/2 axle platform
spring for $150.00.
08\12\{1888}(Su) Wm Durkee came to work this noon @ 3.00. Post man
came to the new mail box to day.
08\18\{1888}(Sa) Mr. Logan ordered farm wagon $65.00.
08\31\{1888}(Fr) (list of orders)
09\01\{1888}(Sa) (another order)
09\03\{1888}(We) Went to Middletown to Drummer's convention.
09\16\{1888}(Su) Spenser came Home from Kent.
09\25\{1888}(Tu) Distance from Waterbury to East Litchfield 18 miles.
10\13\{1888}(Sa) George Sprague bill for 7.00. Sons of veterans and
Mattatuck Drum Corps had clam bake at my shop.
10\14\{1888}(Su) Frank and Gussy stayed at our house.
10\16\{1888}(Tu) {? for this entry}
10\17\{1888}(We) Mr.Wright butchered 8 hogs.
10\22\{1888}(Mo) (listing of orders )
10\25\{1888}(Th) H.B.C.H. ordered 2 mill trucks @ 30.
10\31\{1888}(We) Had Republican Parade in new Britan to night.{sic}
11\01\{1888}(Th) Had Republican parade in Litchfield to night.
11\08\{1888}(Th) Republicans had big parade to night.
11\10\{1888}(Sa) (diagram) Paid Wm up to day.
11\22\{1888}(Th) Painted shop, it took-(list of materials)
11\23\{1888}(Fr) Painted windows in shop.
11\24\{1888}(Sa) Northrop paid .75 cts. on rifle.
11\25\{1888}(Su) Snow fell 4" deep, first snow of the season.
11\28\{1888}(We) Drum Corps owe me $6.16. I owe the Drum Corps $7.84.
11\29\{1888}(Th) Cha's Tues{?} ordered wagon 140.00.
12\03\{1888}(Mo) (accounting)
12\04\{1888}(Tu) Went to South Britan and got 6 yards of cloth for
shirts of .70 cts. per yard, also 12 skiynes of yarn @ .20 per
Sham{?}. (calculations at end)
12\05\{1888}(We) Ordered 1 ton of soft coal.
12\07\{1888}(Fr) (accounts)
12\08\{1888}(Sa) (listing of supplies)
12\17\{1888}(Mo) (diagram)
12\26\{1888}(We) J{?}tohans ordered business wagon $150.00.

In the memoranda section there is the note:
Mr. Fairchild dug potatoes.
Oct. 8th 1 day
Oct. 11th 6 hr.

There is also a keeping of cash accounts in the back section.

The American Diary
1889

On the inside and back covers, there are measures and
calculations in pencil. There is also an almanac section,
addresses and memoranda section, and a timetable for board or
labor in the front. The addresses and memoranda section
contains the addresses of: Mrs. Lidia Chipman, No 51 Central
Av{e}, Eddie Lyons, Sheffeld Mass., and Perre Surprenant, No
323 Bank St. City. The timetable for board or labor is also
filled out with the names of Mike, Durkee, Monroe, and
Munson{?}.

01\06\{1889}(Su) Signed a note for Spenser Monroe for 200. Payable in
two years. from date.
02\06\{1889}(We) (description of a purchase of a quantity of oak wood)
02\07\{1889}(Th) (same sort of description, purchase by Luther
Bradley)
02\09\{1889}(Sa) Durkee Paid up till to night.
02\18\{1889}(Mo) (measures of ordered rivits, iron, and tire bolts of
L.L. Eusworth)
02\19\{1889}(Tu) (more orders made)
02\20\{1889}(We) (diagram and measures)
02\23\{1889}(Sa) Sessions Sent 27 wheels.
02\24\{1889}(Su) Mary had a girl at 9:30 to night. Margaret M.N.
Hall.
02\25\{1889}(Mo) (another order of L.L. Eusworth)
02\26\{1889}(Tu) (another order of L.L. Eusworth)
02\27\{1889}(We) (another series of measures)
03\02\{1889}(Sa) Mr Rice of Cheshire ordered a new 2 horse wagon
simular to Robert Minors for $100.00 with hay rigging.
03\03\{1889}(Su) Mrs. Nettleton got through to day.
03\15\{1889}(Fr) Paid Durkee 2.50 half cord of wood. Borrowed 35.00
of Jas Parter.
03\16\{1889}(Sa) Mrs. Pratt came to do house work to day.
03\19\{1889}(Tu) Luther Bradley by {sic} 160 ft of oak and ash{?}.
03\20\{1889}(We) (figures) Paid Durkee 6.15 one ton of coal.
03\21\{1889}(Th) Paid Durkee 2.00 for book 10.00 cash.
03\22\{1889}(Fr) (another purchase by Luther Bradley)
03\25\{1889}(Mo) (a purchase by George Alexander)
03\26\{1889}(Tu) (an order by A.R. Pierpont)
03\27\{1889}(We) Paid Durkee 6.00 on books.
04\02\{1889}(Tu) O{?} L. Fairchild commenced paying rent to day 3.00
per month.
04\06\{1889}(Sa) Paid Durkee 50 cash.
04\07\{1889}(Su) Paid Durkee 90 in rake and hoe.
04\09Tu) Paid Durkee 2.00 on G.B. Hitchcock account.
04\13\{1889}(Sa) Owe Wm 13.61.
04\17\{1889}(We) Paid Durkee 1.00 cash.
04\22\{1889}(Mo) Mr. Melbourne came to work to day @ 1.50. (measures)
04\24\{1889}(We) Paid Durkee 5.00 he bought 3.12 worth Gracrues{?} of
Spenser @ Pierpont. George Mass and Wm. Clark Den Peck and Ed
Wallace worked on addition to shop.
04\25\{1889}(Th) Paid Durkee 2.00 to Pay for books. Den Peck and
Edgar Wallace worked to day.
04\26\{1889}(Fr) Charged Durkee 1.00 for Mashiers {?} boxes.
05\04\{1889}(Sa) Paid Durkee 3.00 cash.
05\07\{1889}(Tu) Paid Durkee 2.00 cash.
05\09\{1889}(Th) (measures)
05\10\{1889}(Fr) (list with figures)
05\11\{1889}(Sa) (list with figures) Paid Fred Miller payment 2.00
for drum wheele. Bought of P.S. Wedgr{sic} in 1886. Paid
Durkee 3.00 cash.
05\13\{1889}(Mo) (list of clothing)
05\14\{1889}(Tu) Bought of the Alwater Manufacturing Co. a lot of
hardware for 13.75 and of H.D. Smith a lot for 2.09. Paid Wm.
Durkee 10.00 cash.
05\17\{1889}(Fr) Spenser did not work to day.
05\21\{1889}(Tu) (listing of accounts)
05\22\{1889}(We) (measures)
05\27\{1889}(Mo) Owe Henry munson last week's pay and week before
last, and week before that. Owe Tom last week and 8.00 on week
before that.
06\03\{1889}(Mo) (measures)
06\08\{1889}(Sa) Paid Durkee 1.00 cash, paid Durkee 100 on S.P.
Bronson's account.
06\09\{1889}(Su) Michael Burns ordered wagon 50.
06\10\{1889}(Mo) (measures)
06\19\{1889}(We) (listing of accounts)
07\02\{1889}(Tu) (listing of order from George Alexander)
07\09\{1889}(Tu) Paid Durkee 7.00 on Kellogge account.
07\10\{1889}(We) Shop 23" long
07\15\{1889}(Mo) {?} with {?} 16.25 due fines.
07\16\{1889}(Tu) Paid Durkee 1.00 cash.
07\17\{1889}(We) Paid Durkee.50 cts. cash.
08\02\{1889}(Fr) {? for this entry... for wooden pulleys}
08\21\{1889}(We) Paid Jame{?} Reed $10.00 for Rent an John Thackerie{'}s
House.
09\12\{1889}(Th) (listing of accounts)
09\19\{1889}(Th) Paid Spenser Monroe 21.00 to pay months wages.
09\21\{1889}(Sa) CW Hall, Bridgeport, Con.
10\11\{1889}(Fr) (listing of measures)
10\12\{1889}(Sa) (listing of orders)
11\30\{1889}(We) Borrowed 22. of Harman Payne to be paid by the 30th
of Nov. (Paid)
11\22\{1889}(Fr) Engaged Led{?} coal of Mr. Wood at 4.75 per ton.
11\24\{1889}(Su) The freight train went out on the Meridian Waterbury
to Conn River RQ {?} this morning with 25 cars the longest train
I ever saw on that road and the longest I think that ever
passed over it drawn by one engine.
11\27\{1889}(We) Tried to settle with Oscar Fairchild to day.
11\28\{1889}(Th) Thanks giving day the water in the streams was higher
than it has been before in 20 years many bridges was washed
away and the water on south main st and exchange place was 2 ft
deep.{sic}
12\16\{1889}(Mo) (listing of orders)
12\25\{1889}(We) A remarkably warm day more like May than Dec. weather
so warm a man would sweat without an overcoat in the evening. I
heard several moskitoes{sic} buzzing about the house.

A full cash account section in the back section, with a
pencilled calculation on the inside of the back cover.

1890

[[Charles Somers Miller 1890 small workbook]]
Front flyleaf, upper right hand corner (price?):
M
69

Chas S Miller
Jan 1 1890

In the section "Addresses and Memoranda" the following
names are listed with addresses:

Suderberg G{?} Pulson
J H Baird
John T Danovan{Donovan?}
John Megher
F D Miller
O. A. Beckwith
Aldin S Wood
Henry A Makepeace
Fred S Kimball
Frank C Bradford
R S Wells
C S Wells
W A Rice
S S Hougton
Milliard{?} Barnes{?}
J A Squires
L B Moore
Fred S Kimball

In the section "Time Table for Board or Labor"
names and figures are listed for each month,
apparently amounts paid to each person:

Melbourn{?}
Welton
Nettleton
Munson
---
Melbarn{Melhorn?}
Welton
Nettleton
---
Melbaurn{?}
Welton
Nettleton
---
[[the last 3 names are repeated in the 3 sets
(April-May-June; July-Aug.-Sept.) on the
next two pages, then again on the following page
but with "Tom" instead of Melbourn/Milbourn/etc.]]

01\06\1890 (Monday)

George E Nettleton
came to work{worke!} for
me to day at 1 00{?} and
board per day

01\14\1890 (Tuesday)

Moved bailer

01\16\1890 (Thursday)


Mr. Charles Kingsbury
died to day
Aged 95 years the
oldest man in town

01\19\1890 (Sunday)

I stayed home all day

Mary took Clyde and
Irving to the Chapel
and then went to see
their Grand mother at
uncle Geanine's{?}

Cha's Belding and
his girl t___d{tiped?} over
in front of the house
at 1 o'clock to night

01\20\1890 (Monday)

Wrote to Barney & Berry
for Georg Nettleton to day

02\06\1890 (Thursday)

Mr. Munson came to
paint Wright's Carriag_{carriage?}
in my shop to day

02\07\1890 (Friday)

A great blizzard predicti__{prediction?}
for to day.
It snowed a little in
the wven ing{,?} and rained
hard all night

02\10\1890 (Monday)

Wrote to Fred at
New Haven

To have potatoes beets and
other vegtables that grow{growe!}
in the ground do well
plant them in the old
of the moon{moan!}.
And beans peas and o c{?}
that grow above ground
do well plant in the
new of the moon

02\14\1890 (Friday)

Mr. Frost harrow
teeth{teith?} 11 1/2" 4" from end
middle and{an!} 10 1/2 to end
from tooth.

Mr. Gunn of Prospect
gave me his Saladee buggy
for 3.00 to be paid in work{workl!}
and .60 an old account.

02\16\1890 (Sunday)

James{Janes?} Suttan{?} ___{?}
1 tank 8'x3'3"x2'6"

02\22\1890 (Saturday)

Ice{?} is about 4" thick an{and? on? at?}
the pond's{ponds!} thickest it
has been this year, there
has not been three day
in succession that one
_ould{could?} not have plowed
since last summer{?}.

02\26\1890 (Wednesday)

{entry difficult to read}
Georgr{George?} Alexander __{br?}
By 171 ft plank{ptank!}
at .023 3/4 {or .03 3/4?} .03
5.13

03\09\1890 (Sunday)

Mary went to the Chapel{Chaple!}
with Clyde and Irvin{Irving?} and
then went up to Uncle{uncle?}
Le__es{Lewis?}.

04\15\1890 (Tuesday)

Uncle Levinuss Warner{?}
was buried to day.
Dr. Rooland{?} officiated

Austin B Pierpont
Chas J Pierpont
Elmer E Pierpont
Wilson L Pierpont
Chas, Branuis{?} and
myself{mysilf!} were pall
bearers{barers!}
Uncle Levinuss{Lvinus!} was
aged 81 year and
8 months.

04\16\1890 (Wednesday)

Ordered of James{Jamis!} Harry
one{oni!} set of wheels
Price $9.00
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

04\22\1890 (Tuesday)

Paur_ton{?} made eaves
for Dr. Benedict's top
$4.05 Paid

05\14\1890 (Wednesday)

Weather, Warm

Worked digging for
my{ny!} Stor_{Store?} _ank_{banke?} to-day
Had, Fred{F'red!} Wetton 1.00
Tom Melborn{Milbaum?} 1.50
George Nettleton{?} 1.75
Mr. Chas Hotchkiss 1 50 (underlined)
____
5 75

05\15\1890 (Thursday)

Weather, Rained 5 hr

Drew stone and laid
wall for store house
Had Chas Hotchkiss 3.00
George Nettleton 1.75
Italian{?} 1.25
team 3.75 (underlined)
____
9.75

05\16\1890 (Friday)

Weather, Rained

Laid cellar wall
Mr. Chas Hotchkiss 3.00
Fred wit_an{?} 1.00
____
4.00
Lime 1.75
Cement{Cewent!} 1.75
____
7.50
My time{?} 6.00
9.75
5.75
____
29.00
Stour{?} 7 00
_____
36 00

05\18\1890 (Sunday)

Weather, Fair

G. W. Connor, Myself
A B Pierpont C J Pierpon_{Pierpont?}
W L Pierpont{?} had
Mark Warner show us
the bounds around
the estate of Levnus{?}
Warner. Land estimat__{estimated?}
to be from 250{or 25.0?} to 300
acres{acors!} app__sed{appraised?} at
$3.200.00 including
buildings

05\22\1890 (Thursday)

Tom and Fred staid
home to hoe potatoes
all day

05\23\1890 (Friday)

Paul Hesphlt{?} planted
my potatoes for $1.75

05\24\1890 (Saturday)

I told John R Platt
that I would put new
wheels on his wagon{wagan!}
for 22.00
New axles 7.00
pole 1.25
Rubber c__stnan{?} 3.75
Paint 10.00
_____
44 00

Mattatuck Drum Corps had
a meeting this{tohis!} evening
I was elected Leader
_.{?} E. Edwards assistant
Leader James Elliot
Sec Henry Buckingham
Treasurer
Present Miles Booth
" Gardner. Hall.
" H d Norton{?}
" Fred Kilbourn{?}
" H Buckingham
C. Miller
J Elliott
J.{?} Hall
Miles Booth{Baoth?}
We are Engaged to play
decoration{decorathan!} day

05\26\1890 (Monday)

Went to see Carley and
Jerry Danovan for
the Crum Corps{Carps!}
let Jerry take L L
Oviatt's{?} book

05\27\1890 (Tuesday)

Had Crum Corps{Carps!}
meeting to night
Present Sinion Cmith
" Myself
" Henry Buckingha_{Buckingham?}
" Miles Booth
" Gardner Hall
" Fred Kilbaum
" Luke Henderson

05\28\1890 (Wednesday)

Wm Austin{?} Ca{?}
By Cash $5.00

05\30\1890 (Friday)

Drum Corps turned out
for Wadhoms{?} Past
G A R{?}
Those who turned out
men
R. Carley{?}.
Luke Hinderson{?}
Simon Smith
A H Norton
Fred Kilbaum{?}.
C.S. Miller.
J Buckingham.
Miles Booth
Gardener Hall

05\31\1890 (Saturday)

Had D.C. Meeting{Meettng!}
I handed in my
resignation{rezag_nation!}

06\01\1890 (Sunday)

Batanere{?} Due
Thomas Melbaurn{Melbourn?} 32.57
Old iron 26.10
_____
$5_ 67 {57.67? or 58.67?}

Corrected
Batance{Balance?} due You{?}
39.26
iron 26.10
_____
65.36

Paid p__{?} 21 ft 32{.?}5.7

06\06\1890 (Friday)

City Lumber & Coal Co
Dimensions of lumber
wagon
Back axle 2 1/4 solid collar
for 10" hub welded 4' 4"{?}
bolster 4' 4" on bottom{botton!} 7" wide
2 1/4" thick projects 2 1/2{?} over{?}
hub face of b stake{?} 4"
fron{front? from?} end of hub stokes 17"
high 2 1/4x3" at bottom 1 1/2 at
top banded with{?} 1 1/2x3/8
iron. 2 clips an{on?} back axle
make from 1 x 5/16 iron
let in at top so a_{ap?} piece
of band iron can be
screwed on{an!}
Reached
2X4 top a__{are? an?} 10' 6" long in to in
bottom are{arie!} 9' 3"
bold 8 1/2" from back end
Sliding{Slideing!} plate and{ard!} pin
close to end of hound
other sliding plate four and{ard!}
1/4" from front end of bottom
reach center of holes plates
of 2 1/2 band iron fastened
with 2-5/16 bolts

06\07\1890 (Saturday)

Hounds/Haunds{?}
3' 1'{1"?} long 2" thick mortised{,?}
in bed 8 1/2" from reach
braces from clips cane{?}
on to hounds of 5/8 iron
side braces from stake clips
take some bo___{bolts?} as holds
the hounds
Front Axle bed
4' 4" long 2 1/4 " thick 4 1/4"
high plates 18" long
Front Axle
2" solid collar for 10" hub
cliped at shackles and
half way from plate to
shackles.
Front{.?} bolster
4' 9"{?} long 5 1/2" wide 2 1/4"
thick stakes same as
back iron L an{and? on?} bolster
3 bolts in stake and 2 in
bolster{.?}
Ring bolts{?}
4 ring bolts inside of
bolster stakes
Plates
18" long 5/8 thick 2 1/4 wide
T 18" long D 1 1/2x5/8. king C{?}
brace 1 1/2X5/8.

06\08\1890 (Sunday)

{Is this entry for 06\08\1890 or a continuation of the entry on
the previous page?}

brace an{on? and?} reach to front
bolster 1 1/2 x 3/8
Shafts
3 1/4 X 1 3/4 bar 18" from butt
7' from front of bar to
end of shaft_{shafts?}
Whfflitree{?}
3' x 1 3/4
tires 1/2" thick
Out side{2 words?} hub bands
2 1/2 x 1/8{?} band iron

____________________________

Drum Corp Mat__{Matin?}
called to{ta!} order at 8.30
Present Miles Boot_{Booth?}
G. Hall
Chas S Miller
Fred Kilbourne{?}.

Henderson{?}
Mas_ier{Mashier?}

06\20\1890 (Friday)

{entry is difficult to read}

Res___d of A M Rver{?}
$20.00{?} Pa_{?} __{?} wa_o_{wagon?}

06\21\1890 (Saturday)

Paid Tomas Melborn{?}
$32.57 pay in full
for work to ju___{?} 1 ft
1890{'1890!}

07\01\1890 (Tuesday)

Had School meeting
Frank Judd elected carmeette_{committee?}
Wm Austin clerk
Luthur Bradley{?} Treasurer

Decided to hav_{have?} flag
__{on?} the school house

07\17\1890 (Thursday)

George Nettleton stayed
home sick

08\09\1890 (Saturday)

Mr. Carter
busin__{business?} wagon
body 7" deep 5' 9"
wood clash{?}
Pampl{?} seat
back 10" above back
pannel of{?} seat

08\22\1890 (Friday)

George Nettleton{?} Went
to East Haven

08\25\1890 (Monday)

Mr. Munson{?} gave me
5.00 on{an!} account 3.50 due

George Nettleton{?} came
home from East Haven

08\27\1890 (Wednesday)

{entry is difficult to read}

stopped Pastur__g{Pasturing?} ho__{?} in
___{the?} Parters{Pasture?} _______{?}

09\09\1890 (Tuesday)

Width of _______{suttons?} shackle_{shackles?}
3' 5" shackles 1 1/4 x 1/2" bots{bolts}

09\19\1890 (Friday)

This page has several numbers added in a mathematical equation

09\20\1890 (Saturday)

I left home to day at
7 o'clock for a pleasure trip
and drove to to{written twice} Bristol 12
miles then to Forest ville
3 miles then to plainville 2
miles, then to Unionville
8 miles then to Collinsville
4 miles then fed horse at
2 P.M. and went to Canton 1 mile {Is "mile" inserted at end of line?}
____{then? Is "then" inserted at the beginning of the line?} Simbsbury
10 m {is "m" inserted after "10"?} then to
Tar_ffni_le{?} 7 miles{,?} then
East Gramby 4 miles
and staid over sunday
with Mr. John La Fluer{?}.

09\21\1890 (Sunday)

Went to Old Newgate
Prison and West Suffield

Feeding horse .25
stamps (20th) .04
Lodging in _____{house?} 1.50
____
Newgate .20
Beef Sept 22"{?} .13
har__{?} .35
_aper{Paper?} .07
Maps .75
___
horse 1 00 {$1.00?}
myself (23) 1 00 {$1.00?}
____
(24) 5.29
Board for horse 75
" " " 75
feed " " 20
" " " 05
(25) R R FAir _____ 2.7_{2.74?}
Sindr__s{Sindrives?} 26
(26) board _____{?} 2.00
____
(2) " 2 00
rep watch 1 00
____
oats 25
____
(3) board{baard?} 75
4) " 1 25
"{?} lunch 10 {.10?}
____
12.1_{12.10?}

09\22\1890 (Monday)

I drove to Copper hill
3 miles then to Feeding
hill 10 miles then to
Springfield .4{4?} miles
then to Chicapll{?} 5 __les{miles?}
then to Chicapee{?} falls
3 miles than to South
Hadley Falls 4 miles
then South Hadley
3 miles and Stayed
with Mr. Joseph Miller

_____
(5) board{baard!} 1.50
_____
6 " 1.25
lunch .14
_____
(6) Board 1 00
(7) " 1 00
_____
(8) " 2 00
_____
(9) " 1 56{?}
lunch .16
_____
10 Board 1.7_{1.75?}
Postage{Pastage!} .02
11 board{baard!} 1 50
12 bard{board?} 1 50
feed 28
lunch 20
13 bard{board?} 1 00
_____
14 80

Mathematical equation is on this page


09\23\1890 (Tuesday)

I left South{Sauth!} Hadley
this morning and drove to
Hadley to North Hadley
to Sunderland to M_ntog__{Mantogen?}
to Mills Falls to
Northfield Farms to
Northfield to winchester
the whole being 37 1/2 miles

09\24\1890 (Wednesday)

I left Winchester at 7 oclock{oclox!}
and drove to Kein{?}
passing through Westport{?}
and{an!} West Swanzey 13 1/2 __les{miles?}
t__n{then?} drove to Marlborough
to Chesham to Harrisville
to E Harnsville to
Hancock 20 miles
33 1/2 miles to day

Stopped at the house
of Mr. Aldin S Wood.

09\25\1890 (Thursday)

Went to day from
Hancock to Concord
by rail and returned
at night to Mr. Woods

09\26\1890 (Friday)

to day I left Hancock
at 10.45 o'clock and we_t{went?}
to Stoddard 9 miles
then to Marlow{?} 8 miles
then to Lemster{?} 7"{?}
2_{24?} miles to day

{mathematical equation on this page}

09\27\1890 (Saturday)

I left Semster and
Passed through Unity
to Newport 13 1/2 miles
from Newport I drove
through Croudon{?} to
_rantham{Grantham?} then to
Endfield NH 27{27.?} miles
and stayed with
Mr. Fred S Kimball
on{an!} shaker hill

09\28\1890 (Sunday)

Stayed at Fred Kimball_{Kimball's?}

09\29\1890 (Monday)

Stayed{Staryed!} at Fred Kimball's

09\30\1890 (Tuesday)

Stayed at Fred Kimball's

10\01\1890 (Wednesday)

Stayed at Fred Kimball's
and dug Potatoes.

10\02\1890 (Thursday)

Oscar Carr is at
Fort Payne Al
Burning lime has 16
Negroes at work.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

I drove{draw?} from Endfield
to lebanon{?} to Hanover{?}
to lime to Oxford{Orford!}
32 miles

10\03\1890 (Friday)

Drove from Oxford{Orford!} to
Pierpont then to Bradford
Vt then to Corinth
then to west Topsham{?},
the distance from
Corinth to W{?} Topsham
is eight miles{,?} but
I got lost in the mountain
and drove over
12 miles
The whole distance
being 27 miles

10\04\1890 (Saturday)

Drove from West
Topsham to Orange{Oorange!} then
to Barri then to
Montpelier{Mantpelier!} to Middlesex
then waterbury where
I am stopping with
Mr. Phillips{?} at th__{the?}
Villeage house
The distance traveled
is 32 miles

10\05\1890 (Sunday)

drove from Waterbury
village to Waterbury
center then to Bolton{Baltan?}
th__{the? then?} whole{whol!} being 12
miles.

10\06\1890 (Monday)

drove from Bolton to
Jones ville{Jonesville?} to Richmond{?} to
Williston to Birlington
then to Shilbourn to
Charlotte{Charlotti!}{.?} 38 miles

{mathematical equation on this page}

10\07\1890 (Tuesday)

Am at Crown Pa__t{?}
drove through Shellaine{?}
Ferrisburgh Panton
and Addison to
Chimny Point

distance 28 miles

10\08\1890 (Wednesday)

Visited Crown Point{Paint!}
Fort Frederick and
Fort Amerest{?}

Drove through{through!} Bridport{?}
and Shorhan_{Shorhanx?} to
Garrabees Point{Paint!}
distance 22 miles

10\09\1890 (Thursday)

Drove from Larabees
Point to Orwell then
to Hortonville to
Hubbard ton{Hubbardton?} E Hubbar__{Hubbarth?}
and Castleton.
23 miles
Stopping at the
Boamoseen House

10\10\1890 (Friday)

Drove from Castleton to
Manchester. Passing through
Ruttand Clorendon Wallingford
S Wallingford Mr Tabor{Tabos?}
N Dorset E Dorset
52 miles
Stopping at Thayers Hobl{?}

10\11\1890 (Saturday)

Left Manchester and drove
to South Pawnall Passing
through Sunderland
Arlington Shaftsbury
South Shaftsbury
Bennington Pawned{Powned?}
Distance 41 miles

Saw Bennington
monument 301 ft hight
38 ft square at bace{base?} made
of stone cost $200,000.00{?}

10\12\1890 (Sunday)

Left Pawnal and Drove
to Cheshire Mass
by way of Vermont
Williamston Blackington
North Adans{Adams?} Adams
Maple Grove, Cheshire{Cheshre!}
Harbor. Distance 22 miles

10\13\1890 (Monday)

Drove from Cheshin{?}
to Fryingham{Tryingham?} by way
of Berkshire Pittsfield{?}
New Lenox L__{Lse? hill?}
30 miles

10\14\1890 (Tuesday)

Drove from Truingham{Tryingham?}
and Drove to North Gahen{Goshen?}
by way of Monterey
New Marlborough South-Field{hypen in text. Is name hyphenated? 1 word?}
North Norfolk,
Norfol Soup{South?} Norfolk,
and stayed over night
with Mr. Samueal{Samuel?} Gillett{?}.
distance 25 miles

10\15\1890 (Wednesday)

drove from North
Goshen home
distance 31 miles

10\18\1890 (Thursday)

Fred and Tom{?} worked

10\20\1890 (Monday)

Tom and Fred stayed
home to work an{on?} barn

[[10\22\1890 piece of paper in back pocket of the
workbook, dated "Waterbury Oct 22, 1890:
Due H _ Welton on demand value
received Two Hundred Dollars
[signed] Chas. S. Miller]]

10\23\1890 (Thursday)

Fred Welton{Wilton?} worked
1/2 day

10\30\1890 (Thursday)

My horse broke his leg
to day and had to be
killed.

{The following comment is written in what looks like a different
handwriting
Not Jack,{,?} that was
drowned}

10\31\1890 (Friday)

Wrote to John La Fleur{?}
East Gramby Conn

11\05\1890 (Wednesday)

Got a horse of Chas
Gillette of Cheshire
on trial

11\13\1890 (Thursday)

George and Tom and
Fred and myself worked{woked!}
3 hr on{om!} shed

11\14\1890 (Friday)

Fred Miller and Tom and
Fred and George and
myself worked to day on
the shed

11\15\1890 (Saturday)

Mr. Cass and Tom and
Fred and George worked
on shed and myself{nyself!}

200{2.00?}

11\17\1890 (Monday)

Weather, Rained

Tom and Fred and myself
worked in{in?} shed 7 hr

11\18\1890 (Tuesday)

Mr. Cass, Fred Tom
and George and my____{myself?}
worked on{an!} shed
put up rafters and
roof{roaf!} boards

2 00

11\19\1890 (Wednesday)

Cass Tom Fred George
Munson{?} and myself
worked shingling
shed laid 7000 in
5 hr

2 00

11\20\1890 (Thursday)

Cass Tony Fred George
and myself worked
on shed

2 00

11\21\1890 (Friday)

Cass Tom Fred George
and myself worked
on shed

Cass worked 9 hr

1.80

11\22\1890 (Saturday)

Cass Tom Fred George
and myself worked on shed{.?}

Cass worked 9 hr

1.80

{mathematical equation on this page}

11\26\1890 (Wednesday)

Wm Austin Cr{?}
$10.00

George went to
Hartford this noon

11\27\1890 (Thursday)

The Somers Family
spent thanksgiving at
Uncle Willis there
were 49 present{presant!}

11\28\1890 (Friday)

George Was in
Hartford to day

Edward's child died
to day

11\29\1890 (Saturday)

George was in Hartford
to day

11\30\1890 (Sunday)

Mary and I went to
Oakville to visit
George Edwards

12\01\1890 (Monday)

George came home from
Hartford this noon{noom!}

127.90 due George
Nettleton this date
Dec 28 - 1 hr

{mathematical equation on this page}

12\02\1890 (Tuesday)

Ice on Wedges pond
is 6" thick thicker than
it was any time last
winter

12\03\1890 (Wednesday)

Tom _s{is?} home sick with
the chills

12\04\1890 (Thursday)

Tom is sick

12\05\1890 (Friday)

Tom is sick

12\06\1890 (Saturday)

Tom is sick

12\07\1890 (Sunday)

George Edwards and
family and{an!} Cara Miller
and James Elliot visited
us to day

Went to the chapel to prayer
meeting this evening

12\08\1890 (Monday)

Bought a set of 1 3/4 wheel_{wheels?}
19.00 and 1 hub 1.00
Paid 19.00

12\17\1890 (Wednesday)

Worked to night

12\18\1890 (Thursday)

Worked to night

Stephen Wedge borrowed
my buggy to day for
3 or 4 days

11\19\1890 (Friday)

Worked to night

12\23\1890 (Tuesday)

All have{haus!} worked to
night

12\25\1890 (Thursday)

Manhattan Brass Co
Wessell Mfg Co{?}
No 521 W{?} 24th St
NY
T D Milber_{Miller?}

No 238 W{?} 25 St
__{Al?}

12\31\1890 (Wednesday)

$146.00 due George
Nettleton.

{The following entry is on the page following the page for
12\31\1890:

Began pasturing my
horse in Jomes{Jones?} Part___{Parterp?}
lot at .50 cts per week
June 14th 1890}

There is a list of expenses in the back of the journal. These
pages have the heading "Expense for __________." Dates, items and
amount are listed.

Assorted tags and receipts are in the folder in the back of the journal.
There is a tag from Bradley, Hoyt & Do listing No. and Yds.
There is a card from H. B. Stanley, a dealer in watches, clocks and
jewelry and a watch repairer.
There is a card with a receipt on it, dated 10\22\1890{is date correct?}
and signed Chas S. Miller. A mathematical equation is also on this
card. On the reverse side of the card there is another receipt for $200.00
and a mathematical equation. There is some writing along the side edge
on the first side, it is difficult to read.

//end of small book//

The American Diary
1891

Cha's S. Miller, Waterbury, Conn. is written on the inside
front cover, followed by an Almanac section (astronomical
calculations, weights and measures, etc.) and an Addresses
and Memoranda section, containing the addresses: Arthur
Hyvan, Goodwins shop City, Blackmills, Alec Mauthey, 110
Kensington St., New Britain Co., and Mauthey and Wife, 110
Kensington St., New Britain, Conn. There is also a Timetable
for Board or Labor with the names Lom, Welton, and Nettleton.

01\02\{1891}(Fr) Back yard of my shop yard was flooded to the depth of
10". Mr. Fairclough made drain.

01\03\{1891}(Sa) Cold. Cleaned out the shop.

01\04\{1891}(Su) Snowed. Went to the prayer meeting at the chapel
this morning. Mr. Hiram Able had the meeting.

01\05\{1891}(Mo) Snowed. Went to Ed Todds this morning thought I
would freeze before I could get home.

01\06\{1891}(Tu) Worked to night.

01\07\{1891}(We) Fred was home sick{.} Did not work this evening.
Chas Pierpont had a fistula{?} cart out to day {.}

01\08\{1891}(Th) Nice. Good sleighing. Mary and Clyde and Parve{?}
went to town and got Clyde and Parve each an overcoat cost 4.00
each. Mother Pierpont went to grange meeting to night. George
Nettletons Grandfa{ther} Sullivan visited him to day. W.L.
Pierpont brought a pig that weighed 125 lbs.

01\09\{1891}(Fr) Nice sleighing.

01\10\{1891}(Sa) Nice. Mr. Cha's Gillette of Cheshire got his two
horse wagon and traded one bay horse and 10.00 to boot for the
same also ordered an one horse wagon he to pay me 60.00 for it
and the 10.00 makes a total of 70.00 he now owes me. Price of wagon
65.00. {These are the original grammatical errors} Cara
and George Mr. Smith Clyde and me and myself {?} went sliding on
a double ripper this evening.

01\11\{1891}(Su) Rainy. Stayed home all day. Rained very hard the snow
has most all gone at the rate it is going there will be a big flood.
Harris Frost died this morning of{p}neumonia aged 78 he was a nice man.

01\12\{1891}(Mo) Cleared up. The water in mad river was one boat and
a half deep an{d} the floor of the pump station and the road
east of the shear shop is covered big cakes of ice where the
river has run over.-------------------------------------------
Mr. Shilton and a young lady that called him cousin started
from Southington at 6 o'clock this morning with a sleigh at
Stillmans corners the water was so high that it came in the
sleigh they held their feet as high a{s} possible but it wet
the back of the young ladies stockings how she must have felt
she borrowed an old hat and dress as not to wet her own and had
hers under the seat they got wet at my house they exchanged
their sleigh for my buggy as the sleighing had all gone. {The
last sentence was completed on 01\13\{1891}(Tu)} {sic}

01\14\{1891}(We) Tom went to Cheshire and got a hub for Austins
Pierpont's wagon and a set of wheels for E.E. Wrights wagon.

01\15\{1891}(Th) Clear. George Nettleton took a demit{?] card from
the grange which entitles him to join any grange insid{e} of
six months by paying up his back dues if he fails to do so he is
no longer a member of any grange. Let Mr. Jencks take my
Saladee buggy for a time.{sic}

01\16\{1891}(Fr) Clear. Ed Johnson died to day aged 68 to be buried
{S}aturday afternoon in Wolcott.

01\17\{1891}(Sa) Rain and snow.Fred Welton was going to Seymour this
afternoon rabiting {sic} {rabbiting?}

01\18\{1891}(Su) Went to prayer meeting this evening. Bessy Garrigan
led.

01\20\{1891}(Tu) Wright butchered 8 pigs to day. School commenced to
day Miss Patchen teacher.{sic}

01\21\{1891}(We) {weather} Good. Tom was home sick. Wm. Purdy drew 12
truck to Holmes Booth & Haydens to day for me. Mr. Kellogg of
the Pin{?} Co. ordered 8 or 3 pin {?} tubes to day.{sic}
Wright butchered 11 pigs to day.

01\22\{1891}(Th) Rained hard. Big floods in all the rivers about here. Tom
Melbourn{,} Fred Welton{,} George Nettleton and Myself{sic} went to
wedges mill to help hurry saw the old mill was no good and we
sawed but little. {sic}

01\25\{1891}(Su) Snowed. Went to the chaple{sic} to prayer meeting{>}
Miss Annie Frost led the meeting. Uncle Alfred Munson is very
sick.

01\26\{1891}(Mo) Fair. Snow is 15" deep on the level. Cara and I
worked on my books all day.

01\26\{1891}(Tu) Good Sleighing{sic}. Cara and I worked on my books
all day{.} We found that there was $1384.01 owing me and that
last year I did nearly $2,000. worth of work.

01\28\{1891}(We) Nice Sleighing. Mary went to visit Gussy. Got one
set of wheell{sic} of H.C.Hubbell $12.00 was for hub.{sic} Tom
went collecting.

01\29\{1891}(Th) Foggy. Tom and Fred stayed home this afternoon to lay
stable floor. Uncle Alfred Munson died last night at 12
o'clock aged 91 years.

01\31\{1891}(Sa) Sid Munson's hired man ran away with 2,000 {or
20.00}.

02\01\{1891}(Su) Thawed. Went to the Y.P.S. of C.E. this evening.
Edson Hitchcock led the meeting.

02\02\{1891}(Mo) Warm. Wilson Pierponts wife had a baby to night.

02\03\{1891}(Tu) Rained. Medicine to cure worms in horses.
Gentian 8oz
Sulfite Iron {?} mix 4 "
Dose 1 tablespoon full 3 times per day.

02\04\{1891}(We) Cold. The Cattolves{?} are cutting the wood of the range{?}
they bought of Mrs. Cass and Mrs. Doolittle and are clearing it up ready
for their burying ground.{sic}

02\06\{1891}(Fr) Snowed. Went to Holmes Booth & Haydens but Mr. Adams was
out of town. Got a watch chain for Clyde.

02\07\{1891}(Sa) Snowed. Went to prayer meeting{.} Mr. Squires led the meeting.

02\09\{1891}(Su) Thomas Melbourne lumber bill 84.73.

02\10\{1891}(Tu) Miss Haddy came to day. Mr. Hawd finished getting
ice to day has one house 60'x 24'x 20 full.{sic}

02\11\{1891}(We) Clear. Sent George after the washing. A.B. Pierpont
is 42/41 years old today.

02\13\{1891}(Th) An appointment at the Dentist. My wife had a baby
girl this morning at 6:30 o'clock had Barber for doctor and
Miss Haddy (Ruth Brundags) for nurse. I got my emery {sic}
Grinder shaft from the Waterbury machine Co. this morning.
Gave Parter S. Woods some bills to collect.

02\14\{1891}(Fr) Brought Margaret home from Franks because she was
sick with the croup. Clyde and Irving are sick with the croup.

02\15\{1891}(Sa) Had Dr. Benedict to day to attend Margaret.
Mrs. T.B. Egglestone was buried to day she took me to school
the first day I ever attended in 1864. We went to Miss Frost
in the old Acamey {Academy?}.

02\16\{1891}(Mo) Rained. Mrs. B.S. Wedge is 34 years old to day.
Took dinner with Frank on west Liberty street then went to the
bank and to Holmes Booth & Haydens to see about trucks.

02\17\{1891}(Tu) Rained. Mr. C.S. Farclough is 63 years old to day he
is an ugly man. Clyde is sick with the croup Jane is at A.B.
Pierponts sick with the croup Margaret is sick with the croup
and Mary is sick with a baby.{sic} C.S. Gillette ordered a 2
horse wagon through Cha's Ives 100.00. George took dinner at
Father's.

02\18\{1891}(We) Cleared up. Tom carried Cha's Pierponts sleigh
home. George and I took dinner at Fathers to day.

02\20\{1891}(Th) Mr. Sha's S. Gillitte ordered a 2 horse wagon. Mr.
Munson said he saw Mr. Fairclougs wheels last night.

02\21\{1891}(Sa) I saw a new set of wheels on Mr. Fairclougs wagon.

02\22\{1891}(Su) Clear. Went to the Chapel in the afternoon and to
the prayer meeting in the evening{.} Mr. Squares led the meeting.

02\24\{1891}(Tu) Father and I went to Ramson Halls auction{.} I bought
2 stoke chaws{?} for 15 cts.

02\24\{1891}(We) Was in town all this afternoon saw Parter L. Moad{.}
{T}ook dinner at dads.

02\26\{1891}(Th) Snowed They had the darymans{sic} meeting at the
grange hall to day{.} Took dinner at Fathers.

02\27\{1891}(Fr) Snowed. L.L. Ensworths Agent was at my shop to day.
Took dinner with Father.

02\28\{1891}(Sa) Took dinner at Fathers.{sic}

03\01\{1891}(Su) Cold. Went to the Chaple to Prayer meeting Mr.
Hobert Warner led the meeting.

03\02\{1891}(Mo) Cold. Went to see Ben Ferrell about a planer.

03\03\{1891}(Tu) Snowed. Bought a Plainer{sic} of Benjamin Ferrell
for 10.00{.} Paid 8.00 in work and 2.00 cash. The town
commenced cutting the hill on the Meridan road near Mr. Freys
house{.} They worked a little while and gave it up on account
of frost{.} George Benhan ordered a heavy wagon gear price
65.pp.

03\04\{1891}(We) Snowed. Worked on Mr. Wrights buggy. Took dinner
with Father.

03\05\{1891}(Th) Cold. Good Sleighing. Went to grange hall to
dramatic entertainment. J.J. Bryan ordered his buggy fixed up
price 16.00. City Ice Co. Talked about having ice wagon built
with iron gear Price $150.00. They took my telephone away
because I refused to pay for it till the last of the quarter
after I had had the use of it.

03\06\{1891}(Fr) Good. Good Sleighing. They took away A.B. Pierponts
2 telephones for the same reasons they did mine. Miss Haddy
went home and we have engaged Emma Nichols to help do the work.
Miss Haddy weighs nearly 300 lbs.

03\07\{1891}(Sa) Warm. Mr. Wright got a letter from Mr. Fred
Kingsbury about the land back of my shop that we think Mr.
Fairclough wrote.----------------------------------------
Tom Melbournes house was surched {searched} this noon for
liquers.--------------------------------------------------
I carried the Old man Harry home to Cheshire to night and
stop{p}ed at Frank Ives and measured a lot of plank.------
City Ice Co. ordered new wagon $160.00 with springs on it.

03\08\{1891}(Su) Warm. Took Mary and mother Perpont and Clyde and
Jane and Margaret up to Austins for a ride. Went to the Chaple
this evening. Wm H. Durkee led the meeting.

03\09\{1891}(Mo) Rained Hard. Cha's Welton is 33 years old today.
----------------------------------------------------------
Went to see Hall & Upson about their account and then to the
City Ice Co. about their new wagon.

03\10\{1891}(Tu) Good. Mr. Whightman commenced working on my shop
worked 9 hr.

03\11\{1891}(We) Good. Mr. Whiteman and Mr. Garrigns worked on the
shop.-------------------------------------------------------
Mother Pierpont went to Nellie Connors to stay a while{.} Erve
went too.------------------------------------------------------
Wm. Artchenson{?} ordered cart fixed for 14.00.

03\12\{1891}(Th) Rained. Wright and I went to see Cha's Cally about
Fairclough. Wright and Fairclough have been fighting all day{.}
Janty{?} fought Fairclough a little while this morning. Mr.
Garrigns worked 9 1/2 hr, Mr. Whiteman worked 7 1/2.

03\13\{1891}(Fr) Rained. EE Wright and myself went to see Mr. Cally
but he is in New Haven.

03\14\{1891}(Sa) Cold. Cha's Cally made Cha's Fairclough turn his
water from his drive way off my land and told him to put in an
6" or 8" drain pipe.

03\15\{1891}(Su) Nice day. Went to see Mr.Byam about iron roofing.
Went to the chaple this evening to the Young Peoples Christian
endevor{endeavor} meeting Edson Hitchcock led the meeting.
They had the largest meeting I ever saw in the chapel.
AB Pierpont called to see Mary and I about the trouble Charlie
Pierpont is making about mothers property.

03\16\{1891}(Mo) Cold. Went to Woodtick to Mr. Cornellis to see about
some wagons told him I would ask the small one for about 5.00
set no prise{price} on the large one. He is going to bring
some wheels for 18.00 or 20.00. Went to James Wakellee and
bought a window shash for 1.00. Elliott Doolittle called to
see me about a new wagon but I was away. Mr. Whiteman worked 6
hr, Harry Whiteman worked 6 hr.

03\17\{1891}(Tu) Mr. Whiteman worked 6 1/2 hr. in the shop on his
wagon.

03\18\{1891}(We) Mr. Whiteman worked on his wagon 6 1/2 hr.

03\19\{1891}(Th) Mr. Whiteman worked on his wagon 5 1/2 hr. Thomas
Melbourne did not work his wife was sick. I went to
cheshire{sic} this morning to get some spokes and rims for Mr.
Ritters wagon. Mr. Faircloughs wheels came to day.

03\20\{1891}(Fr) Good. Mr. Whiteman worked 8 hr. on his wagon. I
delivered Mr. Faircloughs wheels to him but he would not accept
them and fired them out of the barn for he was mad. Fred
Higgins ordered 2 horse wagon Price $135.00.

03\21\{1891}(Sa) Mr. Whiteman got through on his wagon at noon and
worked for me in the afternoon 4 1/2 hr.

03\22\{1891}(Su) Rained. Rained all day I stayed home.

03\23\{1891}(Mo) Moist. Mr. Whiteman worked for me 8 hr. Stephen
Wedge got a job at the West Brass Mill to day.

03\24\{1891}(Tu) Mr. Whiteman worked 9 hr.

03\25\{1891}(We) Nice. Mr. Whiteman worked 7 1/2 hr., Mr. Garragns
worked 10 hr. I went to Randolphs & Clawes.

03\26\{1891}(Th) James Pater lent me 30.00 to pay Tom Melbourne. Mr.
Fairclough payed me $11.03 to pay all claims and depts{debts}.
{T}his is what it has cost him for being spunky and mean. Mr.
Whiteman didnt work to day. School closed in the East Farms
district to day. Payed Mr. Rockwood 2.50 for lettering CE Ives
wagon.

03\27\{1891}(Fr) Good. Fred Welton did not work. George and Tom and
I worked on the shop. All my family went over to my fathers.

03\28\{1891}(Sa) Nice. Frank and Old Ed sawed 7 1/2 cords of wood to
day.

03\29\{1891}(Su) Nice. Went to the chaple this aftermoon and evening
Rev.{?} Anderson preached this afternoon and Mrs. Harry Garrign
led the meeting in the evening.

03\30\{1891}(Mo) Mr. Whiteman worked 5 hr. Went to Randolphs and
Claws to ask about iron.

03\31\{1891}(Tu) got a load of old iron from R & C.

04\01\{1891}(We) Went to R & C after 2 loads of old iron.

04\02\{1891}(Th) Nice. Went to town this noon and to Mr. Kutters.
Has a talk with George Nettleton about being late in the
morning.

04\03\{1891}(Fr) Snowed 8 inches. Tom was home sick this afternoon.
Old Mr. Parsons came to work this morning at 10 o'clock.

04\04\{1891}(Sa) Mr. Parsons worked 10hr. Attended town meeting to
night. The main object that this meeting was called for was
to appong{appoint} a superintendant of highways and bridges at $1000.00
salery {sic} a year and to repair or build a town house and to
build a cart house and several new streets and to transact any
other business proper to be done. The meeting ajorned{sic} for 3
years without doing any business.

04\05\{1891}(Su) Went to the Chapel this evening. Mr. Squires led the
meeting.

04\06\{1891}(Mo) Cold. Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr. George and I cut an
ash tree over to Wilson Pierponts. Mary had a letter from
Nellie stating that her mother was going to divide the Warner
property among the four boys sons.

04\07\{1891}(Tu) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr.

04\08\{1891}(We) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr.

04\09\{1891}(Th) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr.

04\10\{1891}(Fr) Parsons worked 10 hrs. Mr. Garrigns worked 8 hr
painting my store house.

04\11\{1891}(Sa) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr.

04\12\{1891}(Su) Attended prayer meeting this evening. Miss Flora
Judd led the meeting. My Father is 61/60 years old to day this
is the first time I ever knew how old my Father is.

04\13\{1891}(Mo) Nice. Mr. Parsons worked 10 hrs. Went to Randolphe
and Claws Mr. Demring would not sell the roofing. Clyde came
home from Canors{?}. Walter Garrigns is sick with the mumps
and tyfard fever{typhoid?} and his wife has the mumps to.
Henry Buckinghams wife has gone crazy because she thinks
henry{sic} flirts with the girls at the grange.

04\14\{1891}(Tu) Parsons worked 10 hr. Worked at the saw mill about 3
hr. this morning.

04\15\{1891}(We) Parsons worked 10 hr. Mother is 57/56 years old to
day.

04\16\{1891}(Th) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr. Garrigns worked 8 hr.

04\17\{1891}(Fr) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr. Mr. Garrigns worked 8 hr.

04\18\{1891}(Sa) Mr. Rarsons worked 10 hr. Mr. Garrigans worked
painting shed 8 hr.

04\19\{1891}(Su) Went to Cannors and Charlie Pierponts.

04\20\{1891}(Mo) Tom is home sick. Munson is sick.

04\21\{1891}(Tu) Tom and Fred is home sick. DC Mutug {?} called to
order by Miles Booth in chair 8.13. Voted that John Peacock
became a member. Voted that Luke Henderson became a member.
Bus leaves corner of stay and S Main Sts at 5.30 on next
Thursday evening.

04\22\{1891}(We) Tom was home all day plowing. Fred home 1/2 day.
Parsons worked 10 hr.

04\23\{1891}(Th) Tom worked to day. I went to Cheshire with the drum
corps to drum for the Old{or Odd} Fellows.

04\24\{1891}(Fr) Mr. Wm F Munson died tonight at about 8 o'clock aged
41 years.

04\25\{1891}(Sa) Ervis Wright and myself spent all day ar{r}ainging for
Mr. Munsons funeral.

04\26\{1891}(Su) Wm Munson was buried to day. Rev. Mr. Egglestone
officiated. Miles Ovaitt [Oviatt], Cha's Adams, Cha's Kenea and Mr.
Burlingam were pall brers{bearers}.

04\28\{1891}(Tu) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr. Tom and Fred stayed mone
to day to set out the hedge. Hobert Welton interest comes due
to day.

04\29\{1891}(We) Clyde and I went to Bridgeport. Call on Martelle, Mrs.
Munson, Faney, Champlin, Pierpont.

05\04\{1891}(Mo) Fred Welton was taken sick this noon. did not work
this afternoon.

05\05\{1891}(Tu) Fred welton sick to day. Ferdannand Martel came to
work in my paint shop to day. rent 3.00 per month.

05\06\{1891}(We) Fred Welton stayed home sick. Ed Canger planted my
potatoes to day.

05\07\{1891}(Th) Fred Welton home sick to day.

05\08\{1891}(Fr) Fred Welton worked to day.

05\10\{1891}(Su) Went to Manville Nortons and Cha's Tuttles.

05\11\{1891}(Mo) Paid H.V. Welton 23.00 on interest, 3.10 due now.

05\12\{1891}(Tu) Paid H.V. Welton $3.10.

05\13\{1891}(We) Went to see Mrs. Munson she said Mr. Peckord is
planting her garden.

05\15\{1891}(Fr) Mr. Parsons worked on City Ice wagon 10 hr. Paid
1.40 for lumber.

05\16\{1891}(Sa) Mr. Parsons worked on the City Ice wagon 10 hr. 20
hr.

05\17\{1891}(Su) We went to Praspect {?} for a ride.

05\18\{1891}(Mo) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr on City Ice wagon.
{calculations follow}

05\19\{1891}(Tu) Mr. Parsons worked 10 hr on ice wagon.

05\23\{1891}(Sa) Tom Melbourne was home sick this afternoon.

05\24\{1891}(Su) Went to the Chapel with Clyd and Irve and Mrs. Benham
and Mary. Mr. Garrigns had me place the flags on the souldiers
{soldiers} graves in the East Farmes Burying Ground.

05\26\{1891}(Tu) Drum Corps had a meeting this evening. There wer{e}
present Luke Henderson,L. Lanaitt, C.S. Miller, Miles Booth,
Mr. Pholen, John Marrow, James Elliot.

05\27\{1891}(We) Went to the Ann{u}al Chapel meeting. Mr. Brsdley
Seneca Munson, David Parter and Cha's Frost were elected Chapel
committee for the ensuing year. Hiram Able was elected
Secretary and Mrs. Theodore Munson Treasurer. Meeting ajourned
to June 27th.

05\28\{1891}(Th) Had Drum Corps meeting this evening there were
present H.A. Norton, Henry Cross, George Edwards, Rufus Carley,
Luk Henderson, Mr. Pholen, James Elliott, Miller Booth, C.S.
Miller

05\29\{1891}(Fr) Fred Welton did not work. P.T. Barnum circus was in
town to day.

05\30\{1891}(Sa) Went to the Flag Raising on the high sc{h}ool grounds
had an address by John Milton Mabbott and by Captain
Chamberlain. Had the largest local parade I ever saw in
Waterbury I drummed in the Mattatuck Drum Corps.

05\31\{1891}(Su) Went to Arthur Harrisons and got the sword that once
belonged to Major Byington of Wolcott. Went to the Chapel and
got the wreathes and flags to lay on the graves of the soldiers
in the East Farms burying ground.

06\04\{1891}(Mo) Wallace Andrews said he would see me week after next
which would be the 18th.

06\05\{1891}(Tu) Bal due Clark Bros. $13.69. {The rest is unclear}

06\06\{1891}(Sa) Paid F.B. Fields clerk 27.40 for Fred Welton.

06\07\{1891}(Su) Stayed home all day.

06\08\{1891}(Mo) Went to see A.F. Slater of Wolcott.

06\09\{1891}(Tu) Went to see Mr. Byam.

06\10\{1891}(We) {measures}

06\11\{1891}(Th) Paid Mr. Parsons 15.00 all I owe him.

06\13\{1891}(Sa) George went away on the cars. Fred went to baintom{?}
take fishing.

06\25\{1891}(Th) Went Cheshire.

06\26\{1891}(Fr) Tom and I went to see Wallace Andrews he said

06\27\{1891}(Sa) Tom and I went to Atwoles{?} and bought a 4 year colt
of Mr. Sterry for 100.00. Pais $50.00.

06\28\{1891}(Su) Attended Chapel this evening Mrs. Anne Munson led the
meeting.

06\29\{1891}(Mo) Attended school meeting this evening. A.B. Pierpont
was elected committee, Wm. Austin clerk, Luthur Bradley
treasurer. Voted to have another meeting 2 weeks from to
night.

07\03\{1891}(Fr) Mr. Jencks gave deed of land on corner of Mrs.
Doolittle's road and Cheshire road. Gave Mr. Parsons 25.00.

07\12\{1891}(Su) Mary and Rol Jenner stayed at our house last night
and to day we went for a ride to Cheshire.

07\18\{1891}(Sa) Fred Welton has earned since he worked for me $470.25
and I have paid him $401.51 leaving 68.74 due and taken out
20.60 for {?} leave 4814 now due him. {calculation at bottom}

07\22\{1891}(We) George sma{c}ked Mr. Parson's hand with a 8 pound
sledge driving spokes in the City Ice Co. wagon.

07\24\{1891}(Fr) Paid Mr. Parsons 10.00.

07\28\{1891}(Tu) Paid Mr. Parsons 13.00. Went to see Porter Le Wood
about Mr. Smith's bill.

07\31\{1891}(Fr) Sheriff Rigney came and took Mr. Smith's buggy away.

08\08\{1891}(Sa) George Nettleton started for Hartford this afternoon
on his bicicle{sic}. Went duck hunting this morning at Seatts
pond.

08\09\{1891}(Su) Went to the Chapel this afternoon and evening.

08\15\{1891}(Sa) George Nettleton got through working for me to day I
payed him 140.00 in full to date.

08\16\{1891}(Su) I went to the Chapel this afternoon and evening.

08\17\{1891}(Mo) {measures}

08\23\{1891}(Su) Went to the Chaple and then Father and mother Mary
and myself went to the rattlesnake quarry.

09\01\{1891}(Tu) {calculations}

09\02\{1891}(We) Took Mrs. Wells Carriage home this afternoon. Ervis
Wright is worse to day. Sam Munson is very sick.

09\26\{1891}(Sa) {accounts}

09\28\{1891}(Mo) Arther Merriman ordered cart price $90.00.

09\29\{1891}(Tu) Lockhart ordered wagon made over for 45.00.

09\30\{1891}(We) Henry Carter ordered 1 set of trees for 11.42.

10\02\{1891}(Fr) Paid Mr. Parsons 4.00.

10\12\{1891}(Mo) Paid Mr. Parsons 12.00. All the Miller family went
to Mary Jenners this evening the same being the 15th
anniversary of her marriage.

10\17\{1891}(Sa) {calculations}

10\19\{1891}(Mo) Alfred Northrop came to work for me to day @1.25.

10\22\{1891}(Th) Bought of Henry Whiteman {list}

10\24\{1891}(Sa) Paid Mr. Parsons $20.00.

10\27\{1891}(Tu) Recieved of Mr. J. Gum 200 leaving a balance of 7.15
now due. Snowed to day first snow I have seen this season.
Wright butchered 8 hogs to day.

10\28\{1891}(We) Recieved of the City Ice Co. $169.10 pay in full to
date. Paid Alfred Northrop 7.00.

11\02\{1891}(Mo) Paid Mr. Martelle $38.28 for all due him. 27.00 for
Fabor, 11.28 for me.

11\03\{1891}(Tu) Paid Mr. Northrop 7.50.

11\04\{1891}(We) Paid Mr. Parsons 10.00. Had shop ishured{insured}.

11\05\{1891}(Th) Tom staid home to work.

11\06\{1891}(Fr) Tom stayed home to work.

11\13\{1891}(Fr) Paid Mr. Northrop 7.50. Paid Perre Supernot 11.25 in
full to date.

11\14\{1891}(Sa) Paid Mr. Parsons 15.00. Paid Tom 6.00. Perre did not
work to day.

11\15\{1891}(Su) Peter Marsh the painter and I went to John Marses and
James Harry's. Mr. Parsons worked 9 hr.

11\16\{1891}(Mo) Paid Hobert W.Welton 26.10 interest. Perre worked 10
hrs.

11\17\{1891}(Tu) Perre worked 9 hr. I took Tom Melbourns horse to keep
a spell.

11\18\{1891}(We) Perre worked 10hr.

11\20\{1891}(Fr) {calculations}

11\21\{1891}(Sa) Paid Mr. Parsons 12.00.

11\22\{1891}(Su) All the family went to Mr. Edwards.

11\25\{1891}(We) Paid Mr. Northrop 6.00.

11\26\{1891}(Th) Thanksgiving.

11\28\{1891}(Sa) Paid Perre 1.00.

12\05\{1891}(Sa) Paid Mr. Parsons 7.00.

12\06\{1891}(Su) {calculations and diagram}

12\07\{1891}(Mo) {measures}

12\08\{1891}(Tu) Recived of Fred 30.00 Pay in full to date and AB
Paccaivt{?} Peter Marsh got through painting Mrs. Pierponts
house and went to work for George Benham. I was home sick all
day.

12\18\{1891}(Fr) Arthur Merriman ordered ax wagon for $100.00. Walter
Brooks ordered 2 horse wagon for $75.00. Mr. Iseral Coe died
to day aged 97 years.

12\22\{1891}(Tu) Billy White worked 6 hr. digging my cellar.

12\27\{1891}(Su) Went to the Chaple this afternoon and evening.

12\29\{1891}(Tu) Paul Hesphelt worked 4 1/2 hr digging my cellar. Mr.
Lucus worked 8 hr striping two bobs sleighs.

12\30\{1891}(We) Paul and Billy worked 6 hr digging my cellar.

12\31\{1891}(Th) Paul worked 4 hr., Billy worked 8 hr digging.

There is a note of accounts marked March 2 in the Memoranda
section, and a full Cash Account section. The back cover is
filled with calculations.

The American Diary
1892

An Almanac section in the front, followed by an Addresses and
Memoranda section with the names and addresses: John
Hylander, No 128 Cook St., Bds P. Anderson, Mrs. Krogany, 65
So Elm St., L.J. Richardson, 223 North Elm St.,and Frank
Blodgilt, #117 Demsian St., City. There is also a Time Table
for Board or Labor including the names Tom, Northrop, Fred,
Parsons, Weltran, Cass, Pratt, and Marsh.

Daily Memoranda

01\01\{1892}(Fr) Paul Hesphelt worked digging my cellar 2 hr.

01\02\{1892}(Sa) Miles Farrell was Buried to day at Mill Plain.

01\03\{1892}(Su) Tom Melbourn and I took his colt over to Wm Cooks in
Wollingford for him to keep.

01\04\{1892}(Mo) Old Mrs. Barnes, Cha's Frosts mother in law was
buried to day at Mill Plain.

01\06\{1892}(We) Tom was sick to day. Mr. Rin and his son painted
Austins meat wagon.

01\10\{1892}(Su) We all went to Ed Todds.

01\13\{1892}(We) Waterbury Brass Co. Mill burned to day loss $300,000
ishured{insured} $180,000. Cass came to work.

01\15\{1892}(Fr) Wilson Pierpont drew plank from Todds mill. {?} 25
lbs Rys flour .75 cts.

01\17\{1892}(Su) Charles Frost's Horse run away and smashed the sleigh
to pieces.

01\18\{1892}(Mo) June 16 Setting 1 set t{?} 2.00. All $5.65. W.L.
Pierpont drew plank from Todds saw mill (one load).

01\23\{1892}(Sa) Paul Hesphelt worked on my cellar 16 1/2 hr
White{?} worked 20
----------
36 1/2
Paid Parsons 98.00.

02\12\{1892}(Fr) Went to Bridgeport to the Aluminum Brass and bronze
Co. to see about trucks.

02\13\{1892}(Sa) I{?} Went to Bridgeport to work on trucks.

02\16\{1892}(Tu) Mother went over to Charlies to stay over Trinity
supper.

02\20\{1892}(Sa) Tom went to Bridgeport to work on trucks.

02\25\{1892}(Th) Went to see Randolphes and Clawes about trucks.
Holmes Boogh and Hardens ordered 6 trucks @ 30.00 each no
wheels.

02\26\{1892}(Fr) Fred Miller came to work for me @150.

02\27\{1892}(Sa) Went to Randolph and Claws to see about making
trucks at 15.00 each they to furnish everything except rivets
and bolts. {calculation at end}

02\29\{1892}(Mo) Mr. Cass came to work for me @ 1.50. Fred Miller
went to work casting for the Manhattan Brass Co. of N.Y. City.

03\05\{1892}(Sa) Ed Holmes worked drawing logs from Wilson Pierponts
swanp to Wedges mill and to Todds mill in the afternoon.

03\06\{1892}(Su) We called at George Edwards to day.

03\07\{1892}(Mo) Fred R. Welton Died at 6.30 o'clock this morning.

03\06\{1892}(We) Fred Welton was buried to day.

03\10\{1892}(Th) Wm. Pratt hired out to work for me for one year @
2.25 per day.

03\11\{1892}(Fr) Ed Benham Price for house 1800.00.

03\12\{1892}(Sa) {calculation of...} Time Fred Welton worked since he
came to work after getting through at West Brass mill.

03\17\{1892}(Th) Paid Mr. Parsons 10.00 having 21.70 due.

03\18\{1892}(Fr) Arthur Merriman hired Wm Purdys ax wagon for a time @
1.00 per week.

03\21\{1892}(Mo) Wm Pratt came to work for me @ 2.25 per day.

03\22\{1892}(Tu) R and I ordered 4 wagons for #95.00.

03\23\{1892}(We) City Ice Co. ordered wagon gear for 75.00.

04\04\{1892}(Mo) Arthur Terrell of Wolcott worked digging my cellar
2.00.

04\05\{1892}(Tu) Sam and Johnson worked stoneing my cellar. Sam 2.75,
Johnson 2.40.

04\06\{1892}(We) Sam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\07\{1892}(Th) Sam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\08\{1892}(Fr) Sam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\09\{1892}(Sa) Sam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\10\{1892}(Su) Clyde Irving and myself walked to the top of turkey
hill to day.

04\11\{1892}(Mo) Sam and Johnson Worked on my cellar.

04\12\{1892}(Tu) Sam and Johnson worked on my cellar.

04\13\{1892}(We) Sam and Johnson worked on my cellar.

04\14\{1892}(Th) Sam and Johnson and old Ed worked on my cellar. W.L.
Pierpont and Benham and Wm Austin and Ed Holmes drew logs to
Todds mill.

04\15\{1892}(Fr) Worked drawing sand and stone and lumber. Benham and
Wm Austin and W.L. Pierpont drew logs to Todds mill.

04\16\{1892}(Sa) Sam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\18\{1892}(Mo) Sam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\19\{1892}(Tu) Iam and Johnson worked on cellar.

04\20\{1892}(We) Iam and Johnson furnished cellar.{calculation}
Rec{i}eved of C.S. Miller $50.00 on account {signature}

04\20\{1892}(Tu) The Ovaitts [Oviatts] and Warners started this morning for
Portland Uragan {Oregon}. It will take 617 yards plaster and
12.000 lalte{?} for my house.

05\12\{1892}(Th) Ed Benham commenced my house. Worked himself with 2
men. {wages calculation}

From 05\13\{1892}(Fr) to 08\10\{1892}(We) there are account listings and
various payments made to Mr. Benham and others in reference to
their work on Mr. Miller's house. Apparently, the house was
entirely repainted and possibly whitewashed in places. Mr.
Miller also dug a well with Tom, Cass and Pratt. There are
also the listings of normal hours for the men in the
shop.

08\22\{1892}(Mo) George Whaler worked digging ditches in my lab{?}.

09\03\{1892}(Sa) Borrowed 10.00 of D.G. Paiter.

09\09\{1892}(Fr) Ed Todd sawed 1183 ft of plank last winter for W.L.
Pierpont.

09\27\{1892}(Tu) George Sprage Or by Cash{?} 5.00.

10\27\{1892}(Th) Fred Woods ordered wagon 75.00.

11\14\{1892}(Mo) Went to Ansonia.

11\16\{1892}(We) Cass did not work.

11\17\{1892}(Th) Paid Damelly 3.70.

From 11\21\{1892}(Mo) to 12\07\{1892}(We) there are account listings for work done
on Mr. Miller's well by Miller, Cass, Marsh, and Melbourne.

12\14\{1892}(We) Recieved of C.S. Miller 36.00 as interest.{with the
signature of a Joseph Munger}

12\28\{1892}(We) Miss Haddy came to day.

The Cash Account and Payable and Recievable sections
in the back have partial notation. In the back pocket is a
scrap of paper containing a payment account.

The American Diary
1893

On the inside cover, there is a map of Jackson Park during the
World's Columbian Exposition, 1893. There is also an almanac
section, followed by Addresses and Memoranda, with the
addresses:
John Manteille, Waterbury
Fred D. Miller, 36 Admeral St., New Haven
Wm Morris Jr., No 57 Church St., New Haven, Conn.
J.T. Phalen, 196 Dublin St.
C.H. Tufts, New Haven, Conn., Box 15.93
Wm Morris Jr. 57 Church St., Sec Cau fife and Drum
Assasectry{?}
JB Rogers, Eliot, Maine
JB Rogers, Butte Montana, (Parrot Smelter{?})
LJ Bradley, 39 Park Ave,City
Boylon, (cloth) Grand St., NY
AJ Cammeyer, 6th Ave, (Boot tops) NY
AL Boutillier Brothers, 14th St., NY
James McCreery CC, Broadway & 11 St., NY
JG Hurzmann{?}, Box 438, Waterbury
John W. Fields, ofs{?} Mrs. Lydia Marsh, #86 Penbroke St.,
Bridgeport
Wm Rutter, 186 West 135th Street, New York
JP Howell & Co. 77 Beekman St., NY
JB Haynes, 230 Cherry St.
TC Maulthrop, Bristol, Conn.
Fred D. Miller, 23 Shelton Ave, New Haven, Conn.

There is also a Time Table for Board of Labor with the names
Melbaum, Cass, and Marsh.

There is a listing of accounts from 01\01\{1893}(Su) to 01\06\{1893}(Fr)
concerning feed and payment to workers.

01\10\{1893}(Tu) Baby was born this morning weight 11 lbs. Frank
Pierpont Miller ("Mike")

01\14\{1893}(Sa) 4 below, Cold
01\15\{1893}(Su) 2 below, Cold
01\16\{1893}(Mo) 7 below, Cold
01\17\{1893}(Tu) 17 below, Cold
01\18\{1893}(We) 17 below, Cold

01\24\{1893}(Tu) Had a school meeting this evening to lay a tax to pay
the district debt of $1000.00 but they voted to borrow $200.oo
more B.F. Haggett. Moderator Mark L. Warner Committee.

01\26\{1893}(Th) Sarah Freeman came to work for us at 1.00 per week.

01\29\{1893}(Su) Miss Haddy went home to day.

01\08\{1893}(We) Gunn Paid $1.00.

01\09\{1893}(Th) City Ice Co. ordered 12'foot ice wagon for $250.

01\15\{1893}(We) Wm Purdy Paid $15.00.

02\24\{1893}(Fr) Elizer Hotchkiss Paid 9.25. Wm Strong Paid 2.00.

02\28\{1893}(Tu) Had school meeting.

03\07\{1893}(Tu) 170' oal{?} of James Parter logs.

03\09\{1893}(Th) Went to Hartford to the meeting before the
Agricultural committee.

03\14\{1893}(Tu) Mr. Fitzgeralds wagon is to cost 53.00.

03\21\{1893}(Tu) Had school meeting. Voted to lay 13 mills tax.

04\04\{1893}(Tu) Had school meeting. Voted to lay tax of 7 mills.

04\13\{1893}(Th) (Listing of accounts.)

04\14\(Fr) Mark L Warner Camithe{?} of Mill Plain School
District. The Subscriber ligol{?} voter: of said school
district hereby request you to call a special meeting of
the legal voters of said District for the purpose of laying a
futher school tax; of six mills on a dollar to become due and
payable the 2nd day of Oct AD 1893 said tax to be laid on the
grand list of 1892 dated April 12 AD 1893. SL Monson, WL
Munson, TD Munson, Wm Atkinson,{this list is continued on 04\15\{1893}(Sa)}
David T Squires, OL Fairchild, C Art Ward, LW Holland, GH Pengrey, David Shannon, Hiram W
Bates, CH Monroe, HJ Able, BT Haggett, MB Alcott, Gaylord
Alcott Cha's Ives Seat 495 wide. April 14th Mr. Wright had
11 large hogs and 10 small ones.

04\17\{1893}(Mo) Mr Wright told me he would summonds all the witnesses
he could if he was canaplaned{?complained} of

04\19\{1893}(We) Fred Woods brought 2800 of soft coal.

04\28\(Fr) James Parter, DG Parter, Henson Miller, CS Miller,
Sarah Hine, complained of Wrights Pigs and garbage.

05\01\{1893}(Mo) If I were called to testify I should have to say that
nearly every time I drove by here last summer I caught the
smell terribly from Jim Parters down to your Fathers. It had
aught to have been stoped years ago.{sic} Ed Welton.
--------------------------------------------------------------
I have smelled something pret{t}y strang{e} when passing but
could not say what it was. But this I am sure of I have met
loads of garbage turning in to Mr Wrights place that would have
made me hold my nose had I not have driven from it as fast as I
could. Geo M Benham.

---------------------------------------------------------------


05\02\{1893}(Tu)
I would have stopped it long ago if I could. I had to hold my
breath very strong last summer while passing to and from work.
HJ Able.
---------------------------------------------------------------
No farmer would ever have such a smell on his place. he would
either plow it under or bury it. A man aught to be put in
prison that is mean enough to make the public smell it.
George Alexander

05\03\{1893}(We)
When the wind is northeast We catch pretty strong sniffs of it.
Fred Frampkin
---------------------------------------------------------------
The smell blew across here so strong most of the time last
summer that we could not stand it without closing the windows.
Bradley

05\06\{1893}(Sa) Went to City hall to the hearing before the board of
health in regard to Mr Wrights Piggery. They appointed Mr
Pinney and Mayer Webster to investigate. Select man Pinney
and Mayer Webster inspected Wrights Pig pen's.{sic}

05\09\{1893}(Tu) Mr Wright stopped town team's and 11 men and took the
men in cellar time hindered 12 minutes 2 yoke open and 1 pair
horses.

05\10\{1893}(We) Frank and Gussy Started for Palouse city
Washington star at 8.20 actach{?} A.M. No of Franks Baggage
check 164 Brase 37614 1528 Bros
37615

05\11\{1893}(Th) {list of measures}

05\12\{1893}(Fr) Smelled Wrights pig pens stronger than usual.

05\13\{1893}(Sa) Dr O'Hara inspected Wrights Pig pens and my place and
Hawds and Barnard Son & Co.

05\15\{1893}(Mo) Wright had a load of garbage come.

05\19\{1893}(Fr) Dr O'Hara inspected my place and ordered privee and
sink drain changed.

05\20\{1893}(Sa) JA Joel & Co, 88 Nassau St., NY, Price of flag 8x12
$9.00. Made box for water closet.

05\22\{1893}(Mo) Wright had load of garbage come. Making box and
changing privee 6.00.

05\23\{1893}(Tu) Making cispoal{?cesspool} 800.

05\29\{1893}(Mo) Peter worked 9 hr.

05\30\{1893}(Tu) Decoration Day. Drummed for the veterans at the
Sauldiers {soldiers} Monument and at the raising of the flag at
Mill Plain school house.

05\31\{1893}(We) Peter worked 7 hr.

06\01\{1893}(Th) Peter worked 9.

06\02\{1893}(Fr) Peter worked 4 hr.06\03\{1893}(Sa) Thomas Lillianhad set of
wheels price 15.00. Paid 10.00. Peter worked 6 1/2 hr.

06\05\{1893}(Mo) 10 o'clock Peter got here. Peter worked 5 1/2 hr.

06\06\{1893}(Tu) Peter worked 9 hr.

06\07\{1893}(We) {list of measures}

06\09\{1893}(Fr) {list of measures}

06\12\{1893}(Mo) John Byron ordered coal wagon Price 65.00.

06\14\{1893}(We) {list of measures}

06\16\{1893}(Fr) 9 o'clock.

06\17\{1893}(Sa) {list of measures}

06\29\{1893}(Th) Brown moded {?} all day with machine. Cass moded {?} all
day. Tom worked 1/2 day. I worked 1/2 day at hay.

07\01\{1893}(Sa) Cass Tom and Myself worked at hay.

07\03\{1893}(Mo) Cass hawed Potatoes.

07\05\{1893}(We) Brown Moved the meadow south of the wood. Cass Tom
and I worked 4 hr till driven in by rain and hail some of the
hail stones were as big round as a silver dollar and the shape
of a summer squash.

07\06\{1893}(Th) Waterbury Seap{?} iron Co Field St. Peter worked 1/2
day.

07\07\{1893}(Fr) Wright had load of garbage come to day.

07\08\{1893}(Sa) Cass did not work.

07\16\{1893}(Su) Clyde Irving and Myself drove to New Haven and to
Fort Hale and the old light house and drove home again in the
evening.

07\30\{1893}(Su) Mary and I drove to New Haven and back again to day.

08\01\{1893}(Tu) {accounts}

08\05\{1893}(Sa) Clyde and I went to New Haven. Drove to Cheshire and
went the rest of the way in case{?}.

08\06\{1893}(Su) Went to Charles Island on Mr Bakers tug . Mr Meeker
was pilot.

08\07\{1893}(Mo) Came home from N.H. this morning.

08\19\{1893}(Sa) Paid Mr Muiger $10.00 interest.

10\20\{1893}(Fr) Assessed Property{list}

10\22\{1893}(Su) Franks wife came to our house to stay a while.

11\04\{1893}(Sa) Had Shop inshured{insured} for 720 at rate of 27.00
on the thousand.

11\09\{1893}(Th) Dr O'Hara visited my place to day. Moved water
closet this evening.

11\10\{1893}(Fr) Dr. O'Hara and an American reporter visited my place
to day. Moving privy and making vault 4.00.

11\11\{1893}(Sa) Went to New Haven to see country health officer
Hoadley.

11\13\{1893}(Mo) Country Health officer and Town health officer O'Hara
visited my place and ordered cesspool made.

11\15\{1893}(We) Cass worked on cesspool.

11\16\{1893}(Th) Frank and Cass and Tom and myself worked making
cesspool{account}

11\18\{1893}(Sa) Dr O'Hara visited my place . the time he was there
did not exceed 10 minutes.

11\23\{1893}(Th) Paid Hobert W Welton 30.00.

11\27\{1893}(Mo) {listing of accounts}

12\02\{1893}(Sa) Dr O'Hara visited my place was there about 5 minutes.


In the back is a Memoranda section in which there is the note
LD Bauley, By drawing lumber 800. There is also a full Cash
Account section, and the expenses section is empty.

In the back pocket, there is a piece of paper on which there is
a listing of accounts for clothing bought and repaired, etc.

[[no 1894 diary has been found]]

The American Diary
1895

There is an Almanac section, and an Addresses and Memoranda section in which
there are the addresses: Cd {?} Page, Plymoth{sic}, Conn., John M Hatch, Danbury,
VE Barnum, Danbury, John W Bacon, Danbury, GM Rundel, Danbury, and SH Rundel,
Danbury. There is also a full Time Table for Board or Labor with the names:
Melbourne, Cass, George Cass, Burns, and Tom.

01\01\{1895}(Tu) Have not been able, yet, to find any Diary for 1894. There are shop
Acct. bks. etc.-M. Hall.

01\15\{1895}(Tu) City Ice Co ler{?} By lease or account $10.00.

01\25\{1895}(Fr) M Colloty ordered 1 cart to be done for price{?} 1.11. Price 65.00
Axle 2.11 Body 9" deep from floor.

01\30\{1895}(We) Had a meeting a Mill Plain chapel and it was decided that the Ladies
Union should pay the Ministers and organists.

02\07\{1895}(Th) Hiram Able called on James Parters folks to seat{?} the Chapel
Treasurer. Was informed that they should pay no bills And that we need not
bring any more money there.

03\01\{1895}(Fr) Ladies Union paid Chapel society 14.00 to pay John French to date.

03\18\{1895}(Sa) Paid Mark Pond 20.00.

03\21\{1895}(Tu) Drove to Walnut beach and stayed there over night.

03\25\{1895}(Sa) In memory of forty six American soldiers who sacrificed their lives
in struggling for the Independance of their country, this Monument was erected
in 1852 by the joint liberality of of {sic} the general assembly the People of
Milford and other contributing friends.
Two Hundred American soldiers in a destitute sickly and dying conditions ,
were brought from a British prison ship , then lying near New York, and
suddenly cast upon our shore from a British cartel ship, on the first of Jan.
1777.
The inhabitants of Milford made the most share table efforts for the relief
of these suffering strangers yet notwithstanding all their kind
ministrations, in one month, these forty six died, and were buried in one
common grave.
Their names and residences are inscriven on this monument.
Who shall say that Republics are ungrateful.

08\11\{1895}(Su) Mr McCracken preached at the Chapel this afternoon,
Clyde and Irving and myself went to Bucks hill to Mr Tylers this afternoon.

08\14\{1895}(We) My Wife had a child this morning at 2.30 O'clock weight -11 3/4 lbs.
(Raymond H. Miller)

08\22\{1895}(Th) Told John Pierpont that I would fix up his cart for 17.00.

08\23\{1895}(Fr) Went to Danbury to see about taking decorated wagon to the fair.

08\24\{1895}(Sa) Went to Watertown to see about taking decorated wagon to the
Watertown fair.

09\02\{1895}(Mo) Mr & Mrs Gillett are married 55 years to night.

09\12\{1895}(Th) JH Brauson, #49 N Willow
Heght of wire 13'-6" {sic}

09\16\{1895}(Mo) 6,000 lbs 6.00 8.40 David Bury 13' from{?} Raid

09\18\{1895}(We) {listing of business accounts}

09\20\{1895}(Fr) Veterans Nelson Hall, John French
Continentalon{?} Arthur Pierpont
Puritans Hery Cass, George Hall
Indians Dwight Canklin, Ed Scott
Plowman
Grinder Cha's Hotchkiss
Blacksmith Thomas Melbourne
Cornshiller
Cider Makers George Cass, Clyde Miller
Lanmill Irving Miller
Chicru{?} Wm Canklin
09\21\{1895}(Sa) Fiddler and Dancing Mr Cass, Dan Squairs
Uncle Sam Dexter Northrop

10\01\{1895}(Tu) Wm Byrnes went to work at Roger Bro's

10\10\{1895}(Th) {diagram}

10\14\{1895}(Mo) Threashiers Cha's Minor, Wm Pritchard

11\11\{1895}(Mo) Fred was arrested to day. I went bans for him in the
sum of $200.00.

11\12\{1895}(Tu) Fred had his trial this morning appealed to District
cort{court}. Bands fixed at $200.00, Town band $200.00. Tried
befor{e} Judge Cawell.
D, Mr Burpee
At the time the divorce was granted, would you let the child
go.
Lattie, I suppose I shall have to.
Burpee, I said at the time the divorce was granted.
Lattie
Oh no, I wouldn't let her go at that time under any
considerations.
Mr. webster
Didn't you know that the child was given to you
Fred
Judge Thayer said that either of us could have it and I knew
that she wanted it
Mr Burpee and Webster reads the decree of divorce
Judge Cawell
He aint a fit person to have the costidy{sic} of the child.
Mr Burpee: Why Judge, Look at his past record he didnt pay his
lawers {sic}
Mr Burpee
I wish to beg pardon Mr Hamilton of NH and myself were his
lawyers
Judge Cawell
I was retained on that case myself
11\14\{1895}(Th)
Mr Burpee
Fred Miller is as good a citizen man as there is in Waterbury
as New Haven, if you are going to bring in outside matters, I
shall take an appeal.
Jude Cawell
You and Mr Webster had better settle it between you.
Burpee
We are asking no favors only such as the law provides
Mr Webster
You will find the law on page 36 in the Acts of 93.
Fred
Mr Lawyers, May I speak
Cawell
No, Shut up we have heard enough from you.

11\16\{1895}(Sa) Went to New Haven to see Fred.

11\20\{1895}(We) Went to see the Select men about paying 3.00 a week
for Amy Millers support.

12\03\{1895}(Tu) Will Gillette and I went to Mr Thompsons after Amy
Miller for Fred. Mrs Lattie Miller objected to us taking her.

12\18\{1895}(We) and Wm Gillette Ive saw Lattie on street to day P,M.

12\23\{1895}(Mo) and Card Ive saw Lattie on street to day about 8
o'clock.

12\31\{1895}(Tu) Amy was in Ive's office, and said that her mother was
on the street waiting for her about 2 P.M.

The end pages contain a Memoranda section in which there is a
List of Fairs: Watertown Sept 11 and 12 George Downe
Wallingford Sept 18 and 19
Bristol Sept 25 and 26 TH Keens Pres, BA. Peck
Sec.
Meriden Oct 2-3-4 LE Coe Pres, GW Fairchild Sec.
Danbury 7-8-9-10-11-12 Oct
Wolcott Oct 16
and a list of familiar names with lines drawn through them.
There is a partially filled Cash Account section, and an empty
Payable and Receivable section.

The back pocket contains a Trade Card for Charles S. Miller, as
a member of the Grange effective until Dec 31, 1895. There is
also an empty account slip.

The American Diary
1896

In the beginning there is an Almanac section for 1896, followed by an
Addresses and Memoranda section with the addresses: N D Forbes, Montowese,
Conn., Hattie L. Lyman, Car Round Hill and Wood Sts. City, Artisan S. Clark,
Middlebury, Conn., S H Cae, B736, City, R S Woodruff, 92 Prospect St. $8.50,
L D Miller, #26 Warren St. New Haven, Mr. Mahan, Cole St., Thomas Bulger, North
Orange St., City. There is also a Time Table for Board or Labor with the
names: Melbourne, George Cass, Burns, C. Tuttle, W. Matthew


01\09\{1896}(Th) Went to New Haven to Fred{'}s Trial. The trial was put over till
next monday {lower case his}.

01\10\{1896}(Fr) {not his handwriting} How about sending these{?} to Amy.

01\13\{1896}(Mo) Went to New Haven to day to Fred{'}s tryal {sic} to day{.} He won
his case and had his child Amy granted to him Amy is 9 years old {sic}

01\30\{1896}(Th) Instulation{sic} Beacon Valley furnish Programm,

02\04\{1896}(Tu) Took Caw to ABP

02\06\{1896}(Th) Roalcall{sic} of officers.
George Athunson,
Thomas Fourclaugh
Mrs. French
George Alexander

02\13\{1896}(Th) Starrs Calleage{?} The Agricultural School fund of Conn. Which
offers the greates{t} advantage (benefit) to the future Farmer, Male or Storrs
Calleage{?} Pruning Vines Shrubs & Trees

02\14\{1896}(Fr) (Scene) Carting in Conn in the days of our Grandmother's.
Tom Did not work.

02\20\{1896}(Th) Emmigration Washington{'}s birthday Should the Farmer combine in
establishing prices of farm products

02\27\{1896}(Th) Cuban Questions
Current Events
Pruning vines and trees

03\05\{1896}(Th) Reading of the Courtship of Miles Standish-----------------
Miss May Tatern 3
Miss Wirtman
" Lyman (Arthur) 2
A B Pierpont 5
Mrs W L Pierpont 7
Mrs. C S Miller
Miss Richardson 8
Miss Bessie Tyler
Miss Anna Hall 6
Mrs. Todd 4
03\06\{1896}(Fr) Perkins and Jones carriage to cast 1,400{.} New axles old wheel and
old top.

03\07\{1896}(Sa) Cheshire H E Valentine
New axles 6.00
New tires 7.00
Brake 6.00
Painting 8.00
--------
27.00

03\12\{1896}(Th) {this part has one line drawn through it} Cast of making a Lofe{?}
of bread Should Emigration {sic} Be restricted

03\19\{1896}(Th) {this part with slashes through it} Reading of the origin of the War
songs. Open Grange. {Also, stuck between the pages is a folded rectangle of
paper with the date "November 15th 1886 " and the name "Charlotte Amy Miller"
followed by the words "This is copied from my copy book. And is correct. We
were all very glad to see Mama- although did not quite expect her until
tomorrow. We got along fine-Are all well and got along nicely. You might to
see the washouts. Mama says it was nothing down in N.H. to what it is here-
Come up when you can. Look to Amy. Grandpa Grandma and Aunt Iva all send
love. Cara."

03\26\{1896}(Th) Sister Halls Night

03\30\{1896}(Mo) Fred Perkett (followed by measures)

04\01\{1896}(We) Mr. Rudae accaer{?} with Milbam{?} $17.00
Rented my Paint Shop to Wm Byrnes for 10.00 per month.

04\02\{1896}(Th) Cast of a loaf of Bread Why wheat raising was discontinued in
Conn. rye, and flower {flour}

04\09\{1896}(Th) Why do we cain {?} money except for charge

04\12\{1896}(Su) Stone boat 2'-1" wide {diagram}

05\01\{1896}(Fr) Joseph Saunders Went into partnership today

05\13\{1896}(We) Joe Healeys Pale 4 1/2" wid{e} at evener hole

05\29\{1896}(Fr) \30\{1896}(Sa) \31\{1896}(Su) Listing of names and accounts {owed?}

06\08\{1896}(Mo) Wm Kimball 11.50
John Norton 3.70

06\10\{1896}(We) Distance from center to center of bolts 3 3/16
5/16 bolts {this is unclear} Marvell{?} Norton In Buy 49' wood 4.00

06\18\{1896}(Th) Landlord Barnes
Martin Barnes
Kept tavern near French hill Sothington [Southington]
Waux Spring's
Mr. Aca Barnes kept tavern on sight of Ruben Frasts present house in
Marham{?} The tavern was destroyed by fire. Encamped on French hill
for {continued on 06\19\{1896}(Fr) one week. A spring on the old mountain
road was opened by them while on their march.

07\01\{1896}(We) Thomas Melbourne Worked in April {followed by accounts}

07\12\{1896}(Su) JJ Byam 9.60
DJ Parter 11.16

07\23\{1896}(Th) Joe Slater{'}s child died this afternoon

07\24\{1896}(Fr) Clyde drew the first load of lumber from Mr. Bawleys steam saw mill

07\26\{1896}(Su) Scalts{?} tank 4'-2 x 6'-6"
Clyde, Irving, Margaret, Ruth, Pierpont, and Myself went to
prospect for a ride, saw lots of huckleberries

07\27\{1896}(Mo) Went to the meeting of select-men and traction Companys officers to
consider the layout on the old Cheshire road to the Calvary Cemetary gate.
Selectmen ordered the track placed on the south side of highway

07\28\{1896}(Tu) Went to Bucks-hill Collecting{.} Wm Kimball brought 132' wood.
Balance due LH Frost {calculation}

07\29\{1896}(We) {calculation} Went to Southington to LH Frosts and to Cheshire to
Mr. Valentine's. Valentine paid $15.00

08\02\{1896}(Su) Brother Fred, Clyde and myself drove to Plainville Commuting via
Southington. Met Mr and Mrs AB Pierpont and Mr and Mrs Byam with whom we ate
dinner on the ground. {L}eft home at 9a.m. and got there at 1 P.M. {sic}. The
meeting was a Sweed{t?} one while we were there and was led by Mr Garlanderer.

08\04\{1896}(Tu) JJ Byam, Lewis, Garrigus, Wm Atkinson,and myself being a committee,
met to night to draft a set of bylaws for the Mad River Grange

08\05\{1896}(We) Today has been one of the hot{t}est days that I ever saw or felt

08\06\{1896}(Th) Very hot

08\07\{1896}(Fr) To day was hotter still
Commenced working on the trolley extension from Silver Street to the
City line to day.

08\09\{1896}(Su) Ther. 92 on Lichfield hill
Fred, Margaret, and I drove to Litchfield, and stop{p}ed at Mr Crutches and
Sarah Bissell's, then we drove to North Goshen, to Sam Gilletts, stayed over
night with Malachi Gillette. a long and hot drive

08\10\{1896}(Mo) Fred and I drove from N Goshen to Huntsville then to falls village
{sic}then to Lima Rock then via Lakeville to Millerton N.Y. and back to N Goshen

08\11\{1896}(Tu) Came home from North Goshen

08\14\{1896}(Fr) Had school meeting tonight- to see about painting and repairing
school house{.} ajorned till next wednesday {sic} night to get estimate of
cost.

08\16\{1896}(Su) Went to the Chaple Mr. Kellogg of Wolcott preached

08\18\{1896}(Tu) Worked rep{air} A.B.Pierponts Windmill and pump

08\19\{1896}(We) Had School meeting tonight{.} Mark Warner, Cha's Frost and myself
were appointed a committee to paint and repair the school and fence etc, cost
not to exceed $150.00

08\20\{1896}(Th) Went to Grange this evening

08\21\{1896}(Fr){measures}
08\22\{1896}(Sa) {measures}
08\23\{1896}(Su) {measures}

08\28\{1896}(Fr) Charlie Brown's wife had a baby boy this morning

08\31\{1896}(Mo)- 09\01\{1896}(Tu) {Listing of names and accounts}

09\95\{1896}(Sa) {illegible calculations}

09\06\{1896}(Su) Frank Allen 4.08
M. Archer 6.15

09\10\{1896}(Th) Mrs. Nelson Hall died today
Uncle Joe worked on Ned Pritchards Ice houses straitening {sic}
them up

09\12\{1896}(Sa) Mrs Nelson Hall was buried today{.} Mr Eddridge
officiated and the Grange service was used{.} John Gallagher, Mr
Lewis Garrigus, Wm Atkinson, Truman Kilbaurn, John R.S. Todd, and
myself were the Pall barers. Interment {sic} at Pine Grove Cemetary.
1/2 day I worked on Pritchards ice house

09\13\{1896}(Su) Mr Kellogg of Wolcott preached at the Chapel today

09\14\{1896}(Mo) Worked on Ice House 10 hrs

09\15\{1896}(Tu) Worked on Ice House 6 hrs

09\16\{1896}(We) Worked on Ice houses {and calculations for wage at .25
per hour}

09\26\{1896}(Sa) Mary and I drove to North Goshen to day

09\27\{1896}(Su) Attended Church in the North Goshen meeting house. Had
a very ple{a}sant service{.} In the afternoon Malachi, Lillie,
Marian, Mary, and myself drove to Ivy mountains and went up the
tower
09\29\{1896}(Tu) {diagram}

10\10\{1896}(Sa) Clyde paid Mr. Munger 5.00 on interest, making in all
paid $36.00.

10\14\{1896}(We) Edson Hitchcock and Elnor Beckwith were married at the
Second Church this afternoon

10\16\{1896}(Fr) {measure} Governor{'}s {L?}oat {Coast?} Guard of New Haven had
a parade in town to day.

10\17\{1896}(Sa) Mrs Murice{?} Doolittle died this morning at 8
o'clock{.} Aged 85 years.

10\19\{1896}(Mo) The old shear shop burned this evening, discovered
about 15 minutes of six o'clock by Julus Mass and Miss Nothrop,
at half past it was all consumed. Loss about $40,000

10\20\{1896}(Tu) Mrs Doolittle was buried this afternoon at 2,30{sic)
o'clock{.} Rev M Davenport officiated

10\23\{1896}(Fr) Robert E Pryor was killed this noon by his bull in the
stable{.} During the war he was color bearer for the 20th Regt
C.W. and was shot through eleven times.

10\25\{1896}(Su) Went to the Chaple Mr Hallister Preached {sic}

11\03\{1896}(Tu) National lection {sic} day{.} I voted for McKinley for president of
the United States. and Hobert for vice president. Cook for governor of
Conn{.} and Duell{?} for Lieutenant Governor{.}

11\06\{1896}(Fr) Went to Litchfield this P.M. and evening to take part in the
election parade with the Mattatuck Drum Corps we had 31 men 6 Bass drums
12 snare drums and 12 fifers and drum Major. We saw our new governor Cook.
had {?}2,000 men in line

11\13\{1896}(Fr) Uncle Joe went home from the shop to night and was taken sick

11\18\{1896}(We) Grange Fair opened to night

11\19\{1896}(Th) Aunt Amanda Bronson is 92 years old today


In the back there is a Memoranda section with the notes:
Gold Metal
94 parts Copper
6 parts Autimany
add a little Magnesium carbonate to increase the weight

Tough Brass
10 lbs copper 5 lbs spelter

Cheap Brass for cast locks etc
10 lb spelter to 1 of copper

{a note of measures}

Jessie Frost & Abigail
Van Julus "
Alphons "
Electa "
James "
Abigal "
Jessie B. "


Adam {?for next word} Marie of Duran Joseph Besoh{?} and Cornelus Johnson 103
acres for 4,80 {?for next word} 1748

Justice Warner went west about 1815 to Ohio
Levi Bronson and wife Sarah Prindle Went to Ohio to (Columbia 1808 about)
{sic}

A Cash Account section follows the Memoranda section. The C.A. section
contains names and accounts kept for each name. This is followed by an
Expenses section which contains expenses for the refurbishing of the Mill
Plain School, for which C.S. Miller was commissioned (this is mentioned in the
diary).

The inside back cover is covered with calculations. The back pocket contains
a Grange membership card dated Dec. 31st 1896, a receipt dated Feb. 28, 1896
for $15.75 received of C.S. Miller to LL Emmout{?}, another receipt dated
Nov. 21 1896 for 10 dollars from C.S. Miller to Spencer Pierpont, an empty
envelope with the name "James J Egan" on the front and calculations for Oct.
28 and the address " No 26 Linden St" on the back, a square of paper with the
note: Cheshire Con Oct. 10 1896 Mr C.S. Miller to Edwin A. Todd Dr to making
180 gals cidar at 1 1/2 cts 270
13 gals cider at 5 65
____
335 and a newspaper clipping from the
Waterbury American about the new "Wide Tire Law."


Miller


The Standard Diary
1897
Published for Trade

This diary begins with an Almanac section.

01\03\{1897}(Su) Jan 2 1898 Mr. Nichols preached at the Chapel to
day. Paid 3.50 Collected 1.00

05\26\{1897}(We) Had Chapel meeting this evening and the following
officers were elected.
Mark L Warner, Committee for the Episcopal denomanation {sic}
Luther Bradley, for Methodist;
Robert Warden, for Baptist and Myself for Congregational
Edson Hitchcock, was elected Secretary
Hiram Able was elected Treasurer,

05\30\{1897}(Su) Dr Anderson preached at the Chaple to day.
Collected 2.18
06\06\{1897}(Su) Mr Nichols preached at the Chaple to day. Collected
1.95

06\13\{1897}(Su) Mr Mayl preached at the Chaple to day, there was
collected 2.18

06\20\{1897}(Su) Mr Howell preached at the Chaple to day Collected
.97 cts
Irving was kicked in the head by the horse the wound was
nearly fatal.

06\27\{1897}(Su) Dr Davenport preached at the Chaple to day
Collected 1.73
Thomas Melbourn, and Mr Cawles, had each a child baptised in
the Chaple.

06\28\{1897}(Mo) Had School meeting to night. for {sic} the election
of officers, and to instruct the Committee and Treasurer to
borrow money{.}
Mark L Warner was elected Committee he having had 22
votes my-self 9 Wm Atkinson 2 and someone else 1
B.L. Haggett was elected clerk and Warren Hitchock
Treasurer.
Meeting ajourned {sic} till July 12th

07\04\{1897}(Su) Mr Nichols preached at the Chaple to day.
Collected 1.64

07\08\{1897}(Th) Merritt Scott Died to day of heat desease {sic} and
Dropsey. Aged 66

07\10\{1897}(Sa) Merritt Scott was buried from the Chapel to day

07\11\{1897}(Su) Dr Roland preached at the Chaple to day Collected
1.33

07\12\{1897}(Mo) Had {unreadable word] School meeting elected an
auditor and ajourned 2 weeks.

07\14\{1897}(We) Reports have reached here of great riches of Gold
being found in the Klondike region in Alaska.

07\18\{1897}(Su)Mr Eldridge preached at the Chaple to day Collected
.79 cts

07\22\{1897}(Th) Thomas Milbourns 7 months old child died to day.

07\25\{1897}(Su) Thomas Milbourns child was buried from the Chaple
to day. Mr Hallister officiated. Had no regular service.

07\26\{1897}(Mo) Had ajourned School meeting no business of
importance transacted ajourned without date.

08\01\{1897}(Su)
Amy Welton
Artmeted{?} Welton
Rishy Lerrell
Davis Welton
Trishie{?} Merrill
Lauren Frisbie
The above were Mrs Atkins school teacher in Mill Plain
district.
Mr Nichols Preached at the Chaple to day Collected 1.45

08\03\{1897}(Tu) THe Town set 86 men at work widening the road that
runs from the Mattatuck Co's shop to Grange Hall.

08\07\{1897}(Sa) Had School meeting
Dan Squires was Masen Moderator
Voted to lay a tax of 5 mills on list last completed.
Voted that we invite the members of the Town board of School
Visitors to attend the next meeting which is to be held next
Tuesday evening, ajourned to nex {sic} Tuesday eve.

[[Charles Somers Miller 1898 small workbook]]

Journal for 1898

The following is written on the inside cover in the upper right
hand corner (price?):

70

The following names are listed in the section "Addresses and Memoranda"

Fred D Miller
Miss Louese Townson{?}
Henry I Pond{?}
Martin Buckmaster
Otir Wisan{?}
Fred D Miller
F E Fuller{Fullen?}

01\01\1898 (Saturday)

[[The following comment is written on this page:

For more details
see "Records"
for 1898.

Record books will
follow - M{argaret Miller Northrop} Hall,
1943]]

01\02\1898 (Sunday)

Mr Nichols

01\09\1898 (Sunday)

Dr. Rolland Preached
at the Chapel
Collected 1.60{?}

01\10\1898 (Monday)

E L Frisbie and Charle_{Charles?}
Frost deeded to Wm
Tabor 20,000 surface
feet April 8 1889
for the sum of 2.00
dollars,.
The above is bound__{bounded?}
Northly{Northby!} an land of
estate of Lydia Sackett
Eastwardly{Eastwardby!} by Meride_{Meriden?}
Road, Southwardly by
land of Edward C{.?}
Monnger{?}, and West
by land of the estate.

01\12\1898 (Wednesday)

Those who are to take
part in Chapel entertainment

Miss Fannie Porter{Parter!}
Mr. Murry Beebee 1
7 Arthur Heaton 3R
6 Jennie Patetun{?} _R{3R?}
Mrs. Byam
5 Hiram Able 4R
Arthur Pierpont
1 Margaret Miller 7R
2 Miss Goldsmith 6R
3 Iva Miller 2 Main
4 Mary Porte{?}

01\16\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Howell Preached
at the Chapel
Collected 2.21

01\19\1898 (Wednesday)

Misses Porter{?} and Bunker{"t" written above name, Bunkert?}
Henry Cass Friends
Famuir{?} Porter,
Mrs. Hitchcock
Murry Beiby{?}
Mrs. Byam,
Arthur Pierpont,

01\23\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Halloster Preached
Collected 127{?}

01\29\1898 (Saturday)

Mrs. Pryor
Arthur Pierpont
Mattie Atkinson
Bertha French

01\30\1898 (Sunday)

Dr. Anderson Preached
Collected {blank space} 227

02\06\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Nichols Preached
Collectio_{Collection?} 2.69

02\08\1898 (Tuesday)

Trinity Quentitte{Quentille?}

02\09\1898 (Wednesday)

Ed Todds{Todd's?} Orchestra
Miss Dickinson

02\13\1898 (Sunday)

Dr. Rooland Preached
Collected 3.__{3.55?}

02\20\1898 (Sunday)

No service, on{an!} account
of storm.

02\22\1898 (Tuesday)

Mr. Ables Picture 15x
20"

02\23\1898 (Wednesday)

1 Hellen Rogers
2 March and Dramatic{Drimatic!}

3 Mary Goldsmith
4 C S Miller
5 Margaret Miller
6 Mrs. Rogers
7 ""

02\24\1898 (Thursday)

Recitation
Sketch entitled
Washingtons birthday
Recitation
Recitation
Recitation
Song
Song

{Does the list given on the page for 02\24\1898 correspond with
the list of names given on the page for 02\23\1898?}

02\27\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Davenport Preached
at the Chapel

Collected

03\06\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Nichol_{Nichols?} Preached
Collected {blank space} 198{?}

Fran Grapaplan{?}
entertained{?} - 6.70

03\09\1898 (Wednesday)

Arthur Heaton
Mr. Sincaster and M
George Byan
Mr. Stotan{?}
Mrs. Burrett
Mrs. Byan
* Mrs. Andrews
* Miss Haywood
* Joe Sherwood __{?}
{*check marks are written before these names}

03\10\1898 (Thursday)

Recitation
Laonard, (Mandolin and
Recitation, Guitar)
Violin
Piano
Recitation,
Piano{?}
R________{Recitation?}
Ben Clotfield{Clatfield?}, Sarge

{Does the list of names given on the page for 03\09\1898 correspond
with the list given on the page for 03\10\1898? If so, please
advise if the entries for these two dates should be input in an
aligned form}

03\11\1898 (Friday)

Gave Hotchkiss &{?}
Templeton a note for
$21.95 due 30 days
after date.

03\13\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Maya

03\14\1898 (Monday)

Nov 15{?} 1897 died
Arthur Byington{?}
at Kenasha{?}.{.?} Wis.

03\20\1898 (Sunday)

Annie Pierpont_{Pierponte!} Fined
at Chapel

03\27\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Davenport{?} Preach__{Preached?}
Collected 3 05{?}

04\02\1898 (Saturday)

Mr. Nichols Preache_{Preaches? Preached?}
Collected{?} 2.00

04\10\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Waters of Wolcott
Preached at Chapel
Collected 2.14

04\17\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Mc Kudly{Mc Keedly?} preached
Collected 2.82

04\24\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Nichols Preached
Collected 1.73

05\01\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Nichols{Nicholi!}

05\15\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Howill{?} Preached

Collected, {blank space} 1.80

05\16\1898 (Monday)

John Bropbey send
Mr. Saults{?} to my
place after a sleigh
and paid me 3.00

05\17\1898 (Tuesday)

Mr. Mr.{?} Kudley{Keedley?} {this line underlined}
Preached Collected {this line underlined}
282{2 82?}

05\22\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Davenport
Preached {-?}
Collected 3.40

05\25\1898 (Wednesday)

Morris Alcott{?} &
C S Miller
Luttun{Luttur?} Bradley
Robert Worden{?}
Arthur Pierpont Sec
J I Able{?} Treas

J. H. Garrigus. S__per{Surper?}

Henry Cass, Libraran{Librarian?}

Bessie Garrigus, Organ {ist written above line, Organist?}

05\29\1898 (Sunday)

Dr. Anderson, (Preached)

05\30\1898 (Monday)

Haratia{Horatio?} Chapman
Chaplain East{Eeast!} Haup___{Haupto_?}
G.A._.{?}

Eugene Nichols
East Haupto_{?}
__{?}

Pax{?} 2.41

Rev. M_{Mr.?} Marshal{?}
Moadry __od{road?}
__{?} Addren{?}

06\05\1898 (Sunday)

{M crossed out} Dr. Buckley Preached

06\12\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Parry Preached

06\19\1898 (Sunday)

Dr. Davenport{Davenpoit?} Preach__{Preached?}

Collected

06\26\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Basselt{Bassett?} Preached{Preahed!}
Collected 1.34

07\03\1898 (Sunday)

Dr. Perry Preached
at the Chapel

Collected 1.01

07\10\1898 (Sunday)

Rev. W S Rofter{?}
Preached
Coll__t__{Collected?} 2 33{?}

07\24\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Water_{Waters?} of Wolcott
Preached at the Chapel
Collected

07\31\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Buckley Preached
at the Chapel
Collected 1.5_{1.51?}

08\07\1898 (Sunday)

{"Mr. Hollock" is crossed out} Preached
Collected 1.90
Dr. Faslet{?} of Newark
N.J.

08\14\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Raflet of Waterville
Preached
Collected 3.0_{3.08?}

08\21\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Howell Preach{Preached?}

Collected 256{2 56?}

09\04\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Perry{?} Preached
Collected 1.04

Approved Dexter
Northrope{?} bill of $10.00
for Janitor{?}

09\14\1898 (Wednesday)

E. S. Pritchard, Grand
list 1100

House{Haus! Hous!} was gone in 1790
but the barn was standing.
Ezekial Welton lived{?}
there and Jacob Tyler

09\16\1898 (Friday)

Star Unio_{Union?} line
Price 59 cts per 100 lbs

Blakesll{?} charges 1.25
per hr about 5.00

09\18\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Bassett Preached
at the Chapel
Collected 1.94

09\25\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Waters of Wolcott
Preached at the Chapel
Collected 2.26

09\27\1898 (Tuesday)

To day is my birth day.
{Insert mark and mathematical equation at the end of the above line}
Drove to day from home
to town 2 miles thence
to Watertown 6 miles, then{them!}
to Bethlehem 6 " "
" Romford 8 " "
" Woodville 3 " "
" Milton{?} 6 " "
" W Goshen 4 " "
" Goshen center{caps?} 1 1/2 " "
" North Goshen 5 " "
__
41 1/2

Where I stayed with my
cousin Malachi Gillette.

09\28\1898 (Wednesday)

Went to Obed Stannard's,
" {'?} Harris [Horace?] Stannard,
and to Norfolk Center

09\29\1898 (Thursday)

Went to the Ivy Mountain
town by way of the Black
lands from thence through
the Ovaitt [Oviatt] district to
Cornwall hollow saw the
Gen Sedgwick{?} mansion
and the polace where he
is buried in the cemetery
at Cornwall hollow{hollaw!}, then
we went to Cornwall
Center a distance of
4 miles, the view from the
North as we came into
the villeage was grand
with Cornwall plains in
front of us, there we turned
East towards W Goshen
_ut{but?} when we got to the
top of the mountain in
sight of Goshen we turned
East and went towards
the N__d{Naid?} of Tyler pong
and then N past some
fine farms thense East
again to the foot of the
hill, then N to the
Miles place on the high
land W {M?} of the Ivy

09\30\1898 (Friday)

{Is the next entry or beginnin of next entry a continuation
of the entry for 09\29\1898?}

mountain{mountan!} tower, then
turned East, and went
____{down?}

Went to tipping
rock

10\01\1898 (Saturday)

Came Home

De Grasse arrive in
the Chesapeak on the 30_{30-?}
of Aug, and landed
3,_00{3,200? 3,000?} under the Marqui's{Marquis?}
De St Simon, these troops
were drawn from the garrison/garrisson{?}
of St Domimgo{?},
On the 2___{23"?} of Aug the bound {is there a mark or superscipt text?}
de
Barras sailed from New Port
R I,{, or .?} with eight ships of the line
amd 14 transporte{transports?} ladened with
heavy artillery and stores{?},
and formed a junction{Junction?} with
de Grasse {accent mark over the a} on the 14__{14th?} of Sept.

10\02\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Perry{Perrey?} Preached
Col 1.75

Rache{?} du Fermay was in
the army that acted against{aganst!}
Burgayne, Baron St
Ovary{?} was in the volunteer
service, De
Cadray, an officer
of rank in the
Franch army, was
drowned in the
Schuyklill a few days
after the battle of the
Brandywine {,?} in his
eagerness to cross
it to joing{Join?} Washington{,?}
The Chevelier Duplesis
Maudit displayed the greatest
bravery at Germantown
and Red Bank, and was
assasinated{assassinated!} at Port-au
Price, The heroid gallantry{gallentery!}
of of{written twice} Lieutenant Flurry
at stony point, can
never be{he!} forgotten
Debuysson{?} was not
____{less?} brave.

10\03\1898 (Monday)

Went to town in
fo__{fore? forse?} noon and
Worked for Warden
in the afternoon.

Marquis De Chastellux

10\05\1898 (Wednesday)

Mr. Barmer was buried
from the Chapel to day.

10\09\1898 (Sunday)

Mr. Holmes{Holme's?} House
burned this morning
at about 10 clock{10 oclock?}

12\11\1898 (Sunday)

Collected 2.21

12\30\1898 (Friday)

H W Warner
Oakvill_{Oakville?}
Co__{Conn?}

{In the section "Memoranda" addresses and locations are listed
for the following names:

Mr. E S Frisbie
Iseral Beldwin, Hannah Chatterton
Mr. Farley
Farnk Farley
Moses, Ovaitt [Oviatt] Goshen
Aaron
Nelson
Herman}

{The following note is in the section "Memoranda"

Ladies Union
Paid 260.90
Due Earnest Robenson{?}
25.00}

{In the section "Cash Account":}

Chapel Expense
Jan 12 5 gals oil .50

Warren Hitchcock
Carrying minister 7.00

//end of small book//

Journal 1898, C.S. Miller [bd 10/17/1990 ,11/27; ml 12/1989]

01\10\1898 {Monday}
First thing this morning Mary, Clyde and
Irving went to work at the wash. I read a
time in Poultry Bigelow's history of German
liberty, had breakfast and went to work.
Mother told me this fore noon that Miss Bradly
and the seven other ladies who furnished the
last supper at the Chapel are talking of giving
a supper and musical entertainment in
the Grange hall to raise money to buy a
carpet for the Chapel.
Mr. Warden called while I was at supper
to see about the entertainment we are
going to give at the chapel Wednesday eve.
After he had gone, I hitched up and started
for town but the roads being very icy
and my horse smooth, I left him at my
shop and went the rest of he way afoot
and by the electric cars. Went to see
Mr. E. L. Firsbie, S. R. about the old journal
of Judah Frisbie's. He said that he had had
it but he thought it had been returned
to Uncle Dwight. Then I went to
the Town Clerk's office and copied parts
of the deed from Charles Frost and E.L.
Frisbie trustees{??} for the estate of Lydia
Sackett to Wm. Fabar trustee for a certain
piece of land on which now stands Grange
Hall, then came home and went to bed.

01\11\{1898} (Tuesday)
This was a dark morning. Looked
like rain, sun has not shown to
day. Clyde and Irving had the
chores done before I went to work.
At seven o'clock I carried the milk
to mother and sent a notice of
the meeting of the Ladies Union
to be held in the Chapel on Wednesday
evening by Iva to be published
in the Evening American. Then
went to the shop to work.
At noon went to see Miss Fatern{??}
about getting three school children
to give recetations {recitations} at the Chapel
Wednesday eve. She thought they
would. From here went to the
Mattatuck Shop and Miss Nellie
Cass{??} about some musicians that Henry
had seen. Nellie said they could not favor
us this time but would some other time.
I sent George Hine to Rogers Bros.
to see Miss Bumbart and find wheather {whether}
she and the Porter girls would play
for us. She said they could not.
I rode home from the shop with Marrie{??}
Reid this evening and he told me that
Edward Mc Manus had bought
a building lot west of my house.
Showed me the place.
Mr. Warden called to see me about
the Chapel entertainment. Also talked
about the sleigh seat. Clyde and
Irving went to Frost's Pond to
scate {skate} but returned at supper time
as the surface of the ice is soft
and skating poor. Had supper at
6.36 and then hitched up and went
to prepair {prepare} the Chapel for tomorrow's
meeting. Called on Hiram Able
on the way and got .75 cts. of him
to pay for 5 gallons of kerosene oil
which I sent to Wilson's store
and got it, cost .50 cts. Stopped
at John French's a little while.
We laid the fires, filled the lamps, etc.
and came home and to bed.

01\12\1898 (Wednesday)
We got up late this morning and I
did not get to the shop till half past
seven. It has been warm and foggy
all day. They have had to stop the
ice cutting. Sent George Hine
up to Wolcott to see Mrs. Adelbert
Hitchcock and find if she would
play on the piano this evening at
the Chapel. She said she would if
she could. This evening we {??????}
Irving, Clyde and myself went
to the Chapel to the supper and
entertainment of the Ladies
Union. The attendence was small
on account of the weather, it
being very dark and foggy.
From the supper the Ladies
netted $6.29. The entertainment
consisted of the following,
1. Recitation by Margaret Miller; 2.
Recitation by Miss Mary Goldsmith;
3. Piano Solo by Iva Miller; 4. Reading
by Mary Porter; 5. Recitations by
Hiram Able; 6. Recitation by
Jennie Patchen; 7. Recitation by
little Arthur Heaton which was
very good and was enjoyed by
all. The meeting was out at 10.30 o'
clock and we came home across the
lots, I having my lantern to light
us on our way. Will go to bed at
about 11 o'clock.
I would like to state here that I payed {paid}
Dr. C. Art Ward two dollars towards
the four that I owe him for doctoring
my lame foot. He says he can cure it
he thinks. I hope he can. It is certainly
better than it has been before in four
years at this season.
Last year I measured the hight {height} of my children
on the first of January and this year
we did the same. Clyde, aged 13 years
and three months is 5 ft. 4 1\2 in. high
and has grown 3 1\4 inches during the
year. Irving, aged 11 years and 8
months is 4 ft. and 8 inches tall and
has grown two inches during the year.
Margaret, aged 8 years and 11 months
is 4 feet and 3 inches tall and has grown
2 1\2 inches during the year. Ruth,
aged 6 years and 11 months is 4 ft.
and 1 inch tall and has grown 2 3\4
inches during the year. Frank{??},
aged 5 years and three months is
3 ft., 6 1\2 inches tall and has grown
three inches during the year. Raymond,
aged 2 year and 6 months is 2 ft.
and 11 inches and has grown 5 inches
during the year.
A Frenchman who lives in Cheshire
whom the call Chip had a team
horse die on the road at East Farms
this afternoon while drawing a
load of wood to town.
My wife Mary measures 5 ft. high
and I, 5 ft., 11 inches. My weight is 172 lbs.

01\13\1898 (Thursday)
This morning I pasted news paper clippings
in my scrap book while the
boys did the chores, and after eating
breakfast went to the shop.
The weather has been warm and plesant {pleasant},
more like early May then January.
Pierpont brought my dinner to me
this noon, and I got through work
at 5 o'clock this evening and came
home and had a fine supper of boiled
long{??} clams. Spent the evening
reading, writing etc. To bed about
9 o'clock.

01\14\{1898} (Friday)
Everything was on time this morning
and we got a good start.
Fireman Kilbourn told me this
morning tthat Arden H. Coe's barn
burned the last of last week.
Mr. Reid, the sealer of weights and
measures, came to my shop to seal
my scales for which he required
a fee I objected on the ground that
I did not use the scales enough so that
it made any difference. He claimed
that it was law and that it should
be done and ordered his assistant to
bring in the weights. I asked in
regard to the law and he said he was
acting under the state law and shoved
me a paper certifying that Perry
Morris and and Mr. Doram, selicitmen {selectmen}??
had appointed him. I told him
that I should not have it done and
would remove the scales or have
them smashed as I had not much
use for them and did not buy or
sell with them, and talked law{??}
where upon he gave up. But while
we were carrying on the controversy
in one room about one pair of scales,
the assistant had tested the other
pair and seated{??} them. They were
correct before and I know they are
now.
Frank came to see me this afternoon,
he not being at work because he
did not feel well. He told me of the
big smashup at Benedict & Burnham's
where he works. He said that the 20 inch
shaft{??} had great flaws in it and was not
solid in the center where it broke.
Had wrecking men from Providence to
take off{??} the 40,000{??} gear and 60 torn{??} fly
wheel. Gussy, Frank's wife, called at
our house and took supper with us
after which she went home and we,
Mary and I, went to the Grange.
Just as we were about to start, Mr.
Warden called and wished us to
go with him to a meeting of the officers
of the Ladies Union at my father's
house. But as we were not officers,
we went to the Grange. Miss Fatern,
the school teacher, came and asked if
I thought it would be proper to use
some of the school money to buy an
intermeade {intermediate??} reader which she needed.
We (Mr. Tucker and myself) advised
her to see Mr. Basset of the school board
and tell him that we though it
was best to do so. Charlie Hotchkiss,
myself and Mary walked home from
the Grange together. Charlie said
that his father saw a great fire off
to the west of us {?????} some large barn
was on fire. To bed at 12 o'clock.

01\15\{1898} (Saturday)
It began snowing at about 5 o'clock
this morning and snowed and rained
all the forenoon till about 4 in
the afternoon when it changed to
fog and wet.
I sent Clyde horse back to Arthur
Merrindus{??} in Southington to
measure his cart body.
In the afternoon Mary, Irving
and Harris Tucker went to town
and got the oysters for tomorrow
breakfast and Mary changed
a pair of under rappers and drawers
for me, went to bed early
as I was not feeling well, about
9 o'clock.

01\16\1898 (Sunday)
This morning is clear but the ground
very muddy. Had breakfast of oysters
at about 9 o'clock after which Clyde,
Pierpont and myself went to the Chapel
to get it ready for the service there{??}
afternoon. After fires were built and
other araingements {arrangements} made, I set Clyde
and Pierpont home afoot and I drove
up around by the red bridges to
Mr. Atkinson's after which I drove
home getting there at noon where I
found Mary getting Clyde, Margaret
and Ruth ready for Sunday School.
They went at about half past one
and Mary and I started for service
about half past two.
There was a fair after service{??}. Mr.
Howell preached. He is from Simonsville.
Bessie Simons played
the organ and Mrs. Mauwaring{??},
Miss Agnes Able and Hiram
Able sung in the choir. After supper,
I went to visit Major Tucker. We spent
the evening reading Peyp's {Pepy's??} diary which
he owns and which was published about
1850. I beleave {believe} it was written in short
hand from 1652 to 1722 about, from thence
home and to bed.

01\17\{1898} (Monday)
This morning we arose earlier than usual
and Clyde and I ran the washing machine
before to go to work.
This forenoon Major Tucker sent me a
letter stating that he wished to hire two
girls to commence work this afternoon
and said he had promised work to Dolly
Marrow and Hattie Kilbourn and
wanted to know if I thought they would
answer. I told him that he knew as
much about the Marrow girl as I did
but judging from what I knew of the
Kilbourn folks, I though Hattie would
do very well. This afternoon George
Hine went to Dentist Brown's to
have his teeth filled. James Porter
sent Dexter Northrop to borrow
my horse and wagon to go to Ned
Pritchards to get a farming mill{??}.
It has been freezing cold all day
and skating is good to night and
Clyde and Irving went to Frost's
Pond skating where most of the young
folks of the neighborhood were having
a good time. Send {Sent??} Clyde to the Chapel
with the team to get the scraps and
garbage left from the last supper and
also to Mr Able's to get Mr. Burr
Blakeslee's (of Watertown) history of
Woodbury. The thermomiter {thermometer} is now
9 degrees below zero, to bed at half
past nine. To day David Down's horse
ran away with Frank Frisbie and
Emma Cornelius. He started by Merritt
Scatt's place and ran to the red bridges
where Frank turned him to the left
to go up the hill toards {towards} Atkinson's instead
of going towards Waterbury Center
and in making the turn both of them
were thrown out. Emma struck on
her back and side and was not injured.
Frank hurt one knee but held to the
horse and reined him into Mr. Haggett's
fence and stoped {stopped} him.

01\18\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day has been cold and clear.
The ice men are at work again. When
Clyde went to school this morning I had
him bring the team to the shop and
sent Harry Kilbourn down town to
Hotchkiss and Templetons to get spokes
to repair David Downs wheels with
so I had the team to drive Carrie{??} to
dinner. After dinner, Pierpont
went to the shop with me. I took
some forgings to the Mattatuck shop
and Pierpont went with me. I
stoped {stopped} at the office and talked with
Mr. Tucker a while. Pierpont did
not like it because I did not show
him the machinery.
After we got back to the shop,
Pierpont went down to David
Porter's and stayed til 4 o'clock.
After school the boys did their
chores soon as possible and went
skating on Frost's Pond.
My foot pained me nost of
the time to day.

01\19\{1898} (Firday)
This morning had for breakfast spare rib
and baked potatoes. The day has been fine
for this time of year. Little Pierpont brought
my dinner to me in his little express wagon.
This afternoon he and I took the trolley cars
and went to Waterville to see Adam
Fabor about some money he owed me for
a wagon. He gave me ten dollars. I had
not been in Waterville before since the
trolley cars began to run nearly a year
ago. New house are being built everywhere.
It seems as if the place was as large again
as it used to be.
We got back to the shop at 10 minutes to
five after which we went home to supper
after which Clyde, Irving, Verniem{???} Able
and Harris Tucker and I went to the
Chapel and took down the green trimmings
which had been up since
Christmas after which the boys went
to Frost's Pond skating and I came home
and spent the rest of the evening reading
Cothane's{???} History of Woodbury.
Went to bed at 11 o'clock.

01\20\1898 (Thursday)
This morning dawned dull and rainy,
a little snow fell before daylight.
My sister Cara came home from Bristol
last night and left her grip at the
New England Rail Road Station and
I sent Harry Kilbourn after it this
forenoon. Mr. Simkins left word
that he wished me to shoe his horse
and I went over to the Mattatuck
shop where he worked afer it when
Mr. Tucker saw me and said he
wanted a joiner for a few hours.
I asked him if it was anyting {anything} that
I could do and he said yes, I want a
tumbling barrell set and counter
shaft-|put up. I went to work at it
and Paul Hesphelt{??} and I had it
running at three o'clock.
To night Mary and I went to
the Grange where the new officers
were installed for the coming
year. Wilson Pierpont was installed
master. I beleave {believe} his election was
not legal. I sent a notice to
be published in the American
that the Mill Plain Chapel would
hold its annual fair Tuesday and
Wednesday evenings, Feb. 8th and
9th.
I would say that Mr. Tucker and I
left the Grange at quarter past ten
and we went to his house where we
looked at the papers and New England
magazines till Mary called for
me when we came home. Got home
at 12 o'clock and then to bed.

01\21\1898 (Friday)
This morning was clear to work at 7 o'clock.
This forenoon Major Tucker sent his horse
to me to be shod. He called for it himself
and showed me a letter for it himself
written Wilson L. Pierpont in which
he signified his intention to decline
serving as one of the finance committes
in the Grange, to office he has been
appointed. Pierpont brought my dinner
to the shop this forenoon.
Heard to day that Mrs. Hattie Austin,
widon of the late William Austin of
East Farms was married to Homer
Twichell of Union City.
I have suffered to day from a bad cold
and tonight I wished to send Irving to
H.W. Lake's store for some medicine
but Mary got very cross and I went
myself after I got home and ate my
supper of biscuit and milk. I listened
to Mary read to the children from
Uncle Tom's Cabin after which I
looked over some New England
magazines and then to bed at
midnight.
Dr. C. Art Ward left two bottles of
medicine with me this morning for
my foot.

01\22\1898 (Saturday)
It has been dull weather this morning and
most of the day. This evening it began snowing
about 7 o'clock.
After a breakfast of pancakes, I went to work.
PIepront went down with me. Went to see
mother about getting her book of Geneology
of our ancesters {ancestors}, the Somers. This forenoon
Fred Upson of Wolcott told me that he desires
to sell his farm of 110 acres as he is getting
to {too} old to work it. George Benham has
taken the agency for selling fertilizers
and asked permission to tack an
advertising bill on my shop which
I gave him and he in turn gave me
a ride home to dinner.
For dinner we had spiced meat and
boiled onions, etc. after which I hitched
up and drove to Mill Plain Chapel and
took out the furnice {furnace} grate and took it
to my shop and repaired it.
This afternoon George Hine and myself
went to the Chapel and put the great {grate}
back in the furnace and cleaned out
the Chapel and put things to rights
after which I came home to supper.
After supper Mary and Irving went
to town after the oysters and crackers for
tomorrow's breakfast and also to get Irving
a pair of shoes and rubbers, and I went
to the Mattatuck shop and numbered their
furniture nail machines.
Clyde and Irving and some of the East
Farms boys went to Shelt Hitchcock's
pond fishing but they did not get
any and came home tonight, tired and
hungry.
It is reported that Hattie Austin is not
married as Mr. Twichell is sick.
After writing the foregoing which I finished
at about 12 o'clock, I picked up a book, the title
of which was Uncle Tom's Cabin and I read
in it till 3 o'clock in the morning.

01\23\{1898} (Sunday)
This morning there was a little snow on
the ground but before noon it rained
which took away most of it.
Sister Iva came up this forenoon and
brought home a little table which she
borrowed to play whist on.
I did not go to the Chapel to day.
This afternoon, Mary and I drove
over to Nellie's to visit her as she
was sick. Ater we got home, had
a supper of boiled chickens after
which I went to visit Major Tucker
and stayed till half past ten
when I came home, the wind blowing
hard.

01\24\1898 (Monday)
Went to work this morning. Mary's wrist
was so bad from the sprain she received at
her sister Nellie Connor's last evening that
she could not wash. The weather this morning
was cold and windy at noon. It was cold
but not so windy in the morning and
to night was cold and clear starlight.
This noon I drove round to Dr. Ward's and
got his Phaeton{??} Carriage and took it to
the shop to repair. I stoped {stopped} at the Mattatuck
shop and left Pierpont to hold the horse while
I went in and left the Examiner News
papper, which Cara gave me to have Mr.
Tucker take to Mrs. Dickenson.
This afternoon Edward McManns called
to see if his carts were done.
Mr. Warden called at 5 o'clock and brought
me home. He had just came from Miss
Bradley and he said he was mad
because she did not know that all
the arrangements for the fair were
make {made} and she had not been consulted.
Found Mary and the boys washing,
ate supper of warmed oysters and
grape sauce, bread and butter etc. after which
I took my turn at the washing machine.
Clyde has gone to Frost's Pond to skate.
Irving and Margaret have gone up to
Hiram Able's place to slide down hill back
of the house, Ruth and Raymond are in
bed and Pierpont is still up and running
about feeling good.
Clyde and Irving have returned and
have been having trouble about the lantern.
Irving took it to Able's to see to slide
down hill and set it at a turn in the
path where they were sliding. They also
had another lantern up the hill. Clyde and
Willie Couklin{??} wanted the lantern to
see to skate with and Clyde came and took
it and went to Frost's Pond with it.
Irving and Vernum{??} Able went to the
pond and watching their chance, jumped
out of the darkness and grabed {grabbed} it and
ran to Able's. Clyde and Willie followed
after a time but Vernum heard them
coming and blew he light out and
hid the lantern in the backhouse. Clyde
got Able's lantern and ran but had to
bring it back. After a time they found
out{???} lantern but it was so late they
had to come home and they were complaining
of each other and both were mad.

01\25\{1898} (Tuesday)
This day has been cold and damp and about
quarter past six o'clock it began to snow.
I sawed wood all the forenoon for George
Alexander and ground bone for A.B. Pierpont.
Mr. Mashier called this afternoon and
told me that they expected to have the
trolley cars running to Mill Plain sometime
this season. I sent Irving to Luther
Bradley's with 16 lbs. of ground bone.
Robbie Hall stayed to supper, had biled {boiled??}
eggs, bread and butter.
Mary had been ill to day with the
sick headache and Cara came and did
the work. Mary is better this evening.
This evening Robert Warden came and
left three of his boys while he and his
wife went to town. The boys went
to Frost's Pond to skate but it snowed so
hard that they had to come home, after
which they cracked some walnuts and
had walnuts and apples and played games
till Mr. Warden came. Went to bed at
ten o'clock.

01\26\{1898} (Wednesday)
This morning it was cold and snowy.
The snow lay on the ground about 5 inches
deep. I hitched up into the horse sled
and drove around by Mill Plain
to help make a path for the children
to go to school. Stopped at Mr. Tucker's
and carried him to the shop. On the
was we saw that Mr. Lewis Beckwith
had the frame of his new house up, had
six men working on it yesterday.
This noon I drove to the chapel and
made the fires and got it ready
for the meeting this evening, then
came home and had dinner of cold
sparerib potatoes and bread and butter.
On my way back to the shop I stopped
at the Mattatuck shop and left a
bill with Mr. Tucker, which he said he
would have paid in two or three days.
This evening we went to the supper
and entertainment at the Chapel. There
was a large attendence considering the
snow. The supper was good, but I did
not have any. The entertainment
consisted of a child's play called lyy{??} lo land
in which Margaret Miller, Jennie Squires
and Flossy{??} Able took part, also music
by Miss Amelia Burnhart on banjo, Miss
Fannie Porter on banjo, Miss Nellie Porter
on banjo and Miss Iva Miller (my sister)
on the piano. The older Miss Fannie
Porter gave a recitation and Miss Baldwin
sang a solo {????} the entertainment was
concluded by music by the Misses
Burnhart, Porters and Miller. The ladies
cleared over nine dollars off from the
supper, now to bed at twelve o'clock.
I might add that Mary took
the horse and pung{??} and went to
East Farms this noon and got
Mother Pierpont and Mrs. Warden and
some cake from Mrs. Milan Northrop
and cake and biscuit from Miss Hattie
Pierpont, Mrs. Warden and Mother Pierpont
brought provisions, in all it was a
large load. She took it to the Chapel,
on the way she took in Mrs. Hiram
Able and more cake and children (all
ready she had her own two two, Pierpont
and Raymond) so that load helped to
fill up the Chapel treasury.

01\27\{1898} (Thursday)
More cold weather this morning. Started
for the shop at 7 o'clock and Pierpont walked
down and had Harry Kilbourn make
a little wagon for him. Burt Frisbie came
this morning to have me fix his ox sled
and told me that Frank C. Chipmous'{??}
father has come home after being away
over 30 years. Pierpont brought my
dinner to me. Clyde got home from school
at about three o'clock on account of the teacher,
Miss Whitean being sick. He had to go to
FredWood's for hay and I rode to the trolley
cars and went to see the Rev. Dr. Anderson
about preaching at the Chapel Sunday. He
sold me the history of the Souldiers {Soldiers} Monument
which he wrote himself. Came home and
after supper, Mary, Mother Pierpont and
myself went to the Grange, Joe Huey
brought a note from Mr. Tucker saying
that he wanted to see me soi a recess I
went over and stayed till quarter to ten.
When I went back again and got the women
and drove home, it was snowing some,
to bed at 11 o'clock.
The piano was taken from the Chapel
to day.

01\28\{1898} (Friday)
The weather this evening was cold. After
breakfast of cold ham, potatoes, bred {bread} etc.
I went to work, rode to the shop with
Dick Morgan who was coming to
town with celery, etc.
Elmer Hitchcock came to the shop and
had two cards{?} of wood sawed{??}.
I put iron shoes on the horse stead for
Frank Lackhart who is drawing ice.
Mr. Emmaus who drives Frank Lackhart's
team said that yesterday he
killed three musk rats on the ice pond.
The spring holes are all frozen over and
the rats have to run from the overflow
to the head of the pond where the brook
comes in and while they are running
he chases them and kills them.
Dr. C. Art Ward had sleigh shaft repaired
this forenoon.
This afternoon I {????} took Mother
Pierpont home. In the evening
Mother and Cara called at our
house. Clyde and Irving cracked
some walnuts. I wrote a letter to
Lizzie Warner asking her to go to Father's
to practice a duet with Cara to play at the
Chapel. It is cold now, 10 o'clock, 2 above
zero. To bed.

01\29\1898 (Saturday)
This morning was cold. The thermometer stodd
at two above zero. Went to work at 7 o'clock.
Clyde and I went to town this forenoon and
I went to the Waterbury National Bank to
get a check cashed and Clyde got the oysters
and crackers for breakfast also one set of
horse shoes. Came to Fred Wood's place
and got a horse sled which he wished
me to make over. Came home to dinner.
Clyde carried me back to the shop
and then he went to Mr. Norman's
shop and got .50 cts. which he owed me
thence to Earnest Robinson's house and
told them that Doctor Anderson was
to preach at the Chapel tomorrow, and
then to Mark Warner's and gave my letter
to Miss Lizzie who said she would come to
my Father's Tuesday evening to practice on the
piano. I left the shop to come home at five
o'clock and met Clyde and Irving coming with
the horse and bob sleigh after me. Clyde and
I came home and Irving went to town
afoot to carry a dressed rooster to Miss
Pickett, the dress maker. To day has been
very cold. The thermometer stood at two
degrees above zero at 6 o'clock to night, now
at nine it is 6 above and looks like storm.
To bed at 9 o'clock.
Wm. Norman moved his machinery out
of the old tannery building, had three or
four od Ralph Blakeslee's teams and moved
it to the cars on the Meriden Rail Road
at Silver Street. Is going to take it to
Thompsonville.

01\30\1898 (Sunday)
To day is Sunday and the weather is very
cold. This morning we lay in bed till after 9 o'clock
not feeling very lively owing to my lame foot
and to a hard cold I have had for several days.
The thermometer has not reached a point above
12 degrees above zero during the day and at
half past six this morning it was 10 below.
We went to the Chapel this morning and
got the fires ready and warmed it up, at
one Mr. Tucker came and took me to ride
in his sleigh which he bought in Montreal.
We went to East Farms and from thence
to Woodtick and back to the Chapel where
we attended service, the Rev. Dr. Anderson
preaching, there was a good attendence considering
the cold weather. It was 2 below
zero at six in the evening.
After supper, I went to Mr. Tuckers and
we read Peyp's {Pepy's} Diary about the coming
restoration of King Charles the Second
in 1660. Towards ten we (him and I)
went to bed, we got up at five in
the morning and I came home.
My wife did not like it because
I stayed all night, because she slept so cold,
said her feet had not been warm since yesterday.
At ten last night when Mary came home from
father's, the thermometer was 13 below zero.

01\31\1898 (Monday)
When I got home from Major Tucker's this
morning the thermometer was at zero and it
had been snowing since five o'clock.
After breakfast went to work.
Came home to dinner, it snowing all the
time. Pierpont went back with me and
staid all the afternoon and came to
supper with me, had boiled cold canned
beef{??} and bread for dinner and a pot roast
and baked potatoes for supper.
It has snowed all day but the snow
is but about five inches deep on the ground
now. Bessie Miles went to work in
the Mattatuck shop to day sticking
safety pins on apers. Each paper holds
twelve pins and they earn one cent for
sticking twelve papers. But small as this
seems, some of the girls earn one dollar and
fifty cent sper day. To bed at 9.30 o'clock.

02\01\1898 (Tuesday)
It snowed all night and the wind blew
a gale and this morning the snow was
about twelve inches deep on the level and
drifted bad. We had breakfast of
pancakes after which Clyde and I
hitched Old Jack into the sled and went
around by Mill Plain to break the roads
out. Stopped at Major Tucker's and he
got on the sled and rode to his shop.
Clyde and I went to Father's where we
found him digging out. Cousin
Mary Goldsmith was there having
stayed all night and was in a
worried state of mind because she
could not get to her school upon
East Mountain. I told her i would
carry her up on the sled if she would ride
that way which she seemed much pleased to do
so after she had had her breakfast and I had
drank a cup of hot coffee, we started. Wm.
Peck came for Father, just as we started with
a team, and carried him to the East Mills
to work, so we had the benefit of his trade
that far after which we had to make our
own path till we struck the Prospect Road.
When we got to the School House it was drifted
in, the drifts being about five feet deep
and she could not get in. It was useless
to dig out as it was still snowing
and blowing and was very cold
and the paths would soon fill up so
she concluded to come back home again
as no scholars could get to school
and she could not teach.
On our way down the mountain
we met some of the fisherman going
to the City reservoir to fish, the Water
Commissioner having granted permits
and this is the first day. One load
passed us going to town which had
stayed on the pond all nigh that they
could have the first chance and began
fishing at midnight. They were a snowy,
frozen looking set, all of them.
At the foot of the mountain we turned
to the right and came across the Harper
Ferry Road at the head of the pond
(Brass Mill). We made the first track
through to Frank D. Casse's{??} house.
I got to the shop at 9 o'clock.
I heard to day that Bessie Miles did
not go to work in the shop yesterday
as her mother would not let her.
Heard to day that Mrs. Thornbury
was going to give up her school in
Mill Plain and going to New
Haven to teach. This will please a
good many of the people as she is
not as good a teacher as we have
been in the habit of having.
Came round by Mill Plain, home
tonight, it was very cold.
To bed at nine.

02\02\{1898} (Wednesday)
Got up at 4.15 this morning, built the
fires and wrote a letter to cousin Clarissa
Curtis of Stratford about the information I
wish to obtain in regard to the Somers family.
After a breakfast of pan cakes and molasses,
I went to work. This fore noon Major
Tucker sent for me to come to his shop as
he wished to see me about the Chapel Fair.
Pierpont brought my dinner to me
but I had to take it home again as I
had to go there after my team to get
freight from the depot. Hear to day
that John Mariaty{??} made and assignment
to Robert Lowe. Had a letter from
brother Fred of Detroit saying that
a large party had left there for the
Klondike region in Alaska to dig
gold.
Clyde, Mary and myself went to
Major Tucker's to rig Clyde and
Harrice out like Indians to see goods
at the Chapel Fair.
To bed at 10.30.

02\03\{1898} (Thursday)
To day has been the coldest day I ever
knew, I think. The thermometer this morning
stood 22 degrees below zero and no time
has it been above 20 above and tonight
it was 18 below. We have fine sleighing.
This morning went to the shop.
The large rubber reclaiming shop in
Nangatuck was burned night before
last. It was a building 400 feet long
and 75 ft. wide and 4 stories high
built of brick three years ago, loss
over 500,000 dollars. To night went
to the Grange. The thermometer was
10 below zero when we started.
I sent a letter to Mrs. Irving Prier
by Mr. Schmit asking her to recite
at the Chapel Fair next Tuesday
evening. To bed at eleven.

02\04\1898 (Friday)
This morning the thermometer registered
four degrees above zero. There is about eighteen
inches of snow on the ground and sleighing
is exellent, has been cold all day. To night
the thermometer was 10 below zero.
After breakfast I went to mother's and
wrote a notice to be published in the
Waterbury American that the Mill
Plain Chapel was to have a Fair next
Wednesday and Thursday evenings.
Went to see Mrs. George Hitchcock this
noon. Mr. Tucker carried me there.
Mrs. Hitchcock says that Fannie can
take the part of a squaw at the fair.
This evening went to a meeting at
Mr. Tucker's of those interested in the
Fair. Took in Mr. and Mrs Able on the
way. Went to see Mr. B. Franklin
Haggett about a show case and also
to get him to help make the booths
at the Chapel Monday evening.
Left Mr. Tucker's for home at 10 o'clock.
To bed at 10.30, tied and weary with this
day's toil and chilled with the cold.

02\05\{1898} (Saturday)
This morning was cold but not as cold as yesterday
morning. The thermometer was four above zero.
By noon it was warm and the sun shown
bright. In the afternoon it began to rain
and has rained and thawed ever since.
This morning Mr. Tucker called and carried
me to the shop. I sent Clyde out with a lot
of bills to collect. Clyde brought me home
to dinner. The Warden boys were here to
dinner but did not eat till after I was
through and gone to the shop. This
afternoon Clyde went to Wolcott to
collect bills, had but little success.
The piano arrived at the Chapel this
afternoon. Mr. Porter bought it in New
York (with the Chapel's money). It is an
Estey and they say it is fine.
Mr. Porter and Miss Bradley called on
me and charged me not to let the children
put their fingers on it, and to keep the
cloth cover on it and to remove the cover
so that people may see it tomorrow.
After work Mr. Tucker brought me home
where I found Mr. Warden who had called
to see me about the programme for the
Chapel fair. After supper Clyde and Irving
went to town to get the goods for tomorrow
morning's breakfast and do other errands.

02\06\{1898} (Sunday)
Got up at seven o'clock this morning
and took my bath. The sun rose clear
and warm which melted the snow very
fast. After breakfast Clyde, Irving and
myself went to the Chapel and got it
ready for the service.
The new piano was there. It is a very
nice {???}, "oak case" Estey make.
Came home and went to work on the Indian
wig that Clyde is to wear at the Chapel
Fair, after which I went to the Chapel
service. Got there at about ten minutes
before the meeting closed. Sent Clyde and
Howard Neil over to Southington to
get a lot of Indian relics which Howard had.
After supper I went to Mr. Tucker's and stayed
till eleven o'clock, {?????} home the moon
shining bright.

02\07\{1898} (Monday)
Got to the washing as soon as possible and
to the shop at noon. I sent George Hine to
brother Frank's in Simonsville with Clyde
to get his flint {????} musket to have on
exhibition at the Chapel Fair. Telephoned
to Ed Todd in Mill Dale but could not
get him. Went to the chapel to help get
ready for the fair which begins tomorrow
evening.

02\08\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day the weather is quite warm, every
thing is hurry and bustle in preparation
for the fair. This noon Cara and I went
to the Chapel and it took us till near six
at evening to get my show case ready.
The fair in the evening was a success.
There was a large number of people present
and they nettted about fifty eight dollars.
The supper was well patronized but the
price charged was too low, being
ten cents. The literary programme was in the
charge of Mr. Warden and myself and
was as follows. The first number
was music on the new piano
by Mrs. Bavier{??}, then a violin solo
by Miss Ruth Blair, next a duet by
Miss Fannie Morris and Miss {---------}
Next a short sketch entitled "Coming{??}
to Woo" by Miss Mamy{??} Gearing, Miss
Hattie Murry and Harry L. Merrill
which was very amusing, also a song
by Mrs. W.S. Rogers who was accompanied
by her daughter Miss Sallie
Rogers. During the singing of this
last piece, as Sally was reaching towards
the end of the piano with both hands, the
top of the piano stool toppled over and
she fell to the floor, which caused some
confusion for a few minutes, but I got
the organ stool and she went at it again.
I stayed to night in the Chapel there
being a great value of goods there which
the people though needed protection.
Mr. Tucker stayed with me. We took the
blankets and robes for the fortune tellers
tent and made a bunk on the platform
and went to slleep but the fire went
out and I had to get up { ? ? ?
? ?} rebuild it so I was awoke
most of the night.

02\09\{1898} (Wednesday)
Went to work to day. The weather was
warm and sleighing is fast disappearing.
Went to the Chapel this evening at about
5.30 o'clock. There was a large crowd there,
so large that had many more come they
would have had to been packed so close
that there would not have been breathing room.
Every thing passed off quietly and
all had a good time, except Miss
Bradley who was jealous because she
could not run everything as she wished
and she tried to make all the trouble
she could. In spite of her efforts, the
fair was a success and they netted
a little over one hundred dollars.
The entertainment of which
Mr. Warden and myself had in
charge consisted of, first a piano
solo by Miss Burrett, second a
recitation by Mrs. Irving Prier,
3rd music on mandolin and piano
by Mr. and Mrs {------}, fourth
a recitation by Miss Buchannan,
fifth a tambourine drill by a number
of young ladies of the Waterville
school. I gathered some of my things
and came home and to bed at
two o'clock in the morning.

02\10\{1898} (Thursday)
This day has been a tired and painful
one for me. My foot pained me so
I could not work this afternoon very
much. The weather has been fine
and warm. Went to the Chapel this
noon and again this evening and
removed some of the stuff away.
The ladies have cleaned it out and
put things to rights for which I am
very thankful, to bed at nine.

02\11\1898 (Friday)
This was a very foggy morning and remained
damp and cool most of the day. I drove
to the shop and sent Harry Kilbourn to town
to get some lumber. After he had gone,
Thomas Heaton came with his wagon to
be repaired. Mr. Daniel G. Porter called to
see me about the new piano in the Chapel.
Mr. Tucker called to see if I knew of any
young man in this part of the town
whom he could get to work at press work.
He told me to call and see hime at noon.
I went and gave James Porter his Indian
spear heads, also his Indian gouge{?} and
talked with him some time, after which
I went to dinner, after which Mary
carried me to the Mattatuck shop where I
saw Mr. Tucker, and he said that he had
a job at press work where he could pay
from one to two dollars a per day and
asked me if it was any thing that I
would think of. I told him that it
was but that I would like a little
time to think it over, to which he agreed.
Worked in shop all afternoon, and
walked home at night. Mary sent
Pierpont home with Grandma after
which she drove to town and got home
at about six o'clock. Had supper of
canned lobster. After supper, Clyde,
Irving and myself paired and sliced
half a bushel of apples while Mary
read in "Little Women" to the children.
My foot is very painful.
Mr. William Norman moved away
from the Dolittle place yesterday to
Thompsonville, this state. Fred Woods
told me that he went away and left
unpaid to him a coal bill of one hundred
dollars. I am told he has not
paid his shop rent for two months
and is behind on the house rent.
I am glad he is gone for I think him
a hardened villain. It is my opinion
that he set the shear{??} shop on fire as
suspicion points that way and
Fred Brainard told me that "he
done it by God just as true as I
stand here". He was standing in
front of my shop door at the time
and I noted it in my last year's diary
of that date.

02\12\{1898} (Saturday)
To day has been a damp foggy one.
At breakfast I took a strong drink of
boneset{??} tea to cure my cold. Irving
drove me to the shop.
This forenoon Mr. Tucker came for
me to come to the Mattatuck shop to
move out four safety pin machines
and to bring a boy.
Walked home which was very
hard as the road was slippery and
I was very lame. After dinner, went
to the Mattatuck shop and had George
Hine help me take down the pin
machine which the company has
sold. Mr. Tucker told me that he had
told Mr. Judd that I was coming to
work for them, said that Mr. Judd
was well pleased. Recived {Received} a letter to
day from Mr. D. G. Porter in which he
stated that he had caused the removal
of the seat on the west side of the Chapel.
He has done it against the desires of
the Chapel committee.
Clyde went to town tonight for
oysters for breakfast.
Mr. Warden called to see me about the
Gropaphone{??} entertainment to be held
at the Chapel next Friday evening.
To bed at nine.

02\13\{1898} (Sunday)
This day is the Sabbath and I did not hurry
to get up, started to about seven o'clock and
put my truss{??} on, but my wife played
about me so affectionelly {affectionately} that I went back to
bed with her and lay till nine o'clock
when I got up and got the rest up. I kindled the
fire and cooked the oysters and sat down to
breakfast when Major Tucker called and wished
me to go out to Mother Pierpont's after some
apple with him. When we came back he carried
me to the Chapel (whither the boys had all
ready gone) to get it ready for the service.
After we came home I shaved and got washed
up and wrote a notice to be read in the
Chapel in regards to the Graphaphone{??} entertainment
to be given in the Chapel next
Friday evening. Then Mary and I went
to the Chapel and heard Dr. Rooland read
the Episcopal service and preach a very good
sermon. Came home and had a supper
of chicken and then went to Mr. Tucker's
where I stayed till eleven o'clock when I
came home across lots, found the way very
dark. Mr. Tucker told me that he intended
me to take charge of the upper floor in the
Mattatuck shop and to get ready soon as posible
so good night at 12 o'clock.

Margin between two pages:
We played "Hunt the Thimble" and had ice
cream. Very elegant.

02\14\{1898} (Monday)
Arose a half past five this morning.
The sun came out bright and the day seemed
as if it would be a fair one, but it rew
dull towards noon and soon it rained,
afterwards turned to snow and sleet.
I went to work at the Mattatuck shop
this morning taking out the safety
pin machines. After we had got them
to the lower floor we went to work
packing the pins that were made and
packed about twenty four hundred pounds
in barrels, this together with what
was in the boxes made about thirty six
hundred pounds which we took down
the elevator. Came home to dinner and
had Pierpont drive me back to my own
shop where we repaired M. Simpkin's buggy
after which we (George and I) went again
to the Mattatuck shop and finished packing
pins, wire etc. Then we went back to my
own shop and had not been there long
when Charlie Hotchkiss brought a note
from Mr. Tucker asking for one or two
boys to help load freight. I sent George
Hine over. Arthur Merriman of Southington
called and paid me what he owed
me. Clyde brought me ten dollars
from Adam Faber of Waterville which
I very much needed. I in turn paid it
to Harry Kilbourn as a part of his wages
due. Horice{??} Tucker invited Clyde, Irving,
Margaret and Ruth to his house to
spend the evening, it being his birth
day. He is twelve years old to day.
To bed at 8 o'clock.

02\15\{1898} (Tuesday)
This morning was bright and fair but
during the forenoon the weather grew
dull and rain and snow this afternoon.
Wrote a letter this morning to Mary
Goldsmith asking her to have her scholar's
sell tickets for the Phonograph entertainment
to be given in the Chapel next
Friday evening. And also asking her
to recite a piece on Washington's birthday
night.
This morning Mr. Tucker called and
asked me if Harry Kilbourn would
come to work for him at $1.25 per
day. I asked Harry and he wants
till morning to think it over.

02\16\{1898} (Wednesday)
This morning the snow had fallen to
the depth of three inches by daylight
and the weather was cold and the wind
blew a gale which had continued all
day. Towards night the weather grew
clder till it became one of the owrst
nights known in this section.
Wrote a letter to Charles S. Gillette of
Cheshire about the card that I am building
for him.
This evening Howard Neil called at
our house.

02\17\{1898}
This morning the thermometer registered
4 degrees above zero, and the wind blew
very hard. Traveling is exceedingly bad
on account of the weather and drifts.
I heard this morning that the
new United States Man of War ship
Maine was blown up at 10 o'clock
Tuesday evening in the harbor of
Havanna, Cuba; 233 men lost their
lives. I {???} the Spainards have done it
which I think them mean enough to
do. I hope they will have to suffer.
Col. Phillips of Pittsfield is to give
a grapophone entertainment in the Chapel
tomorrow evening, and Clyde and I
went to night and got the Chapel
ready from thence we went to see
Mr. Warden and found him recovering
from sickness which is the reason
why I have not seen him before.

02\18\{1898} (Friday)
This morning was warm and pleasant
but after noon the weather changed and
it began to rain and snow so that the
evening wet and unpleasant.
Mr. Warden went to the New England
Depot and met Col. Phillips who was
to give the entertainment at the
Chapel this evening. Mother kindly
kept him over night. To bed at 12.

02\19\{1898} (Saturday)
This morning was fair, arose a quarter
to six, had bacon and boiled eggs.
Went to the shop at 7 o'clock. Clyde came
at 10 minutes to eight and took the team
and carried Colonel Phillips to the
New England Rail Road station to
take the train to Cheshire via Plainville
where he is to give an entertainment
this evening.
Came home to dinner of bacon
and potatoes. Found that the boys
had split a good pile of wood so I let
them go to East Farms to play with
the Warden boys. Went to the Chapel
to night in the rain to practice for a
drill to be given next Wednesday evening.
Sent my team with Clyde after
the girls who were to take part in
the drill. They were Lena Hurlbert,
Ida Spender, Fannie Hitchcock, Clara French,
Cara French, Elsie French, Dolly Marrow,
Margaret Miller and Ruth Miller, Olive
Able. Stayed till 10 o'clock, had Clyde
carry the girls home and then we came
home, it raining very hard. To bed at 12.

02\20\{1898} (Sunday)
This has been one of worst days that I
have ever seen, as regards the weather.
Rain, snow, sleet and cold have prevailed
all day and night. There was no service at
the Chapel, only six or seven persons being
there. I in the evening went to Major
Tucker's to spend the evening, but the weather
being bad I stayed all the night and
came home at 6.30 in the morning, it still
raining hard. A curious incident happened
to me last evening. As I was going to bed,
my rupture slipped out and I could not
get it back again. After trying for some
time and failing, Mr. Tucker went for
Dr. Ward but while he was gone it slipped
back again much to my relief and joy.
The disaster which befell the Maine
man of war last Tuesday when she sunk
and 265 perished seems to be uppermost
in the minds of the people and many
think that it will result in war with
Spain.

02\21\1898 (Monday)
Wet and stormy all day and night.
On the ills the trees are ladened with ice
which the oldest inhabitant says he
never saw equaled before. In many
places the roads were impassable on
account of the fallen trees, orchards
are ruined in many instances and
maple, elm and ever hickory are
broken to pieces.
In the valleys near the streams there
is no ice at all, but above a certain
level, it begins and the higher up
one goes the thicker it becomes.
Went to the Chapel to night to
practice for the exercises on Washington's
birthday evening. (I should say
the evening of the 23rd). To bed at 12 o'clock.

02\22\{1898} (Tuesday)
It has rained and snowed all day, mud
very deep. Busy as I can be making
preparations for the Chapel entertainment
to morrow evening.
Rufus Carley called and got a Drum
Corps uniform for Mr. Humphrey, also
Mr. George Thompkins called and borrowed
another. They are to use them at the
old fashioned supper to be given at
the Second Congregational Church
this evening in honor of Washinton's
birth day.

02\23\{1898} (Wednesday)
This morning was wet and more mud
than I have ever seen before in this
locality. There is not a whole tree left
standing in Ed Todd's or the Barnes'
peach orchards owing to the ice storm of
Sunday. Mrs. Rev.{??} Philipps{??} of Prospect
measured the circumference of the
ice on a twig the size of a lead pencil
and it was 18 inches. Great damage
is reported from the hills of Wolcott, Prospect,
Watertown, and Waterbury.
This evening we gave the entertainment
at the Chapel in honor of Washington's
birthday. It was well attended and
a great success, many said the best
entertainment ever given in the Chapel.
The programme consisted of,
1. Song, Red White and Blue, 2. Recitation
by Margaret Miller, Entitled Feb. 22nd,
3. Patriotic Recitation by Mary Goldsmith
4. Song, Star-Spangled Banner, by
Mrs. Rogers, 5. Recitation, Washington,
by Helen Rogers, 5. March and
dramatic sketch, entitled Washington's
Birthday, 6. Recitation by myself
entitled Washington's Birthday,
7. Song, Yankee Doodle.
To bed at 12.30 o'clock.

02\24\{1898} (Thursday)
To day the sun has shown and the
weather had been fair which we appreciate
as it is so long since I have seen
the sun before.
Last night I caught a bad cold which
had made me feel bad to day.
This evening Mary went to the Grange
but I stayed home and went to bed at
8 o'clock.

02\25\{1898} (Friday)
To day I took the signs down from the
front of my shop. Miles Payne called
to see me about buying a lot of stock{??}
that I have on hand. Grandma
Pierpont is with us to day. She told us
that Hattie Pierpont has gone in to
town to board till the first of June.

02\26\{1898} (Saturday)
To day has been damp and cool. Sun shone
some. Mr. Clark's barn burned last night.
Mr. Clark lives on the Woodtick Road above
Ashton's Corner.

02\27\{1898} (Sunday)
Got up at 8 o'clock this morning. Had breakfast
of oysters, after which Clyde and
Irving and myself went to the Chapel
and got it ready for service.
George Somers called to see us. He hopes
that there will be war with Spain.
Many seem anxious for war but I
hope that I may not see it, but
no one know what the result of
the sinking of the Maine man of
war in the harbor of Havanna
may be.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon
and heard the Rev. Dr. Davenport
deliver a discourse on Abraham Lincoln
which seemed very appropriate as the
12th of this month was the anniversary
of his birth. Also he held the executive
office of the Nation previous to the war
of the Rebellion, and as many now think
that we are now on the verge of war. He
(Mr. Davenport) made it seem very interesting.
There was a large attendence at
the Chapel considering that the traveling
was very bad, on account of the
mud.

02\28\{1898} (Monday)
To day the weather has been damp and
raw, most everybody has colds.
The ice has disappeared from most
of the ponds, and the icemen are very
blue as they have gathered only about
half a crop and many of the ice
houses are empty. Mr. Theodore
Patchen moved to town to day from
Mr. Zenas{??} Bowen's place above the
red bridges on the Woodtick road near
the Mad River. Will Blewitt will move
in soon.

03\01\1898 (Tuesday)
The weather to day has been good considering
that it is the first of March.
Went to night and cleaned out the Chapel
cellar and then sent the keys to Dexter
Northrop who is to be the janitor in the
future.
This morning the dwelling houses of
Charles E. Smith and George E. Benedict
situated on Highland Avenue on Town{??}
Plot{??} were burned to the ground. The
fire started in the cellar of Mr. Smith's
house, and the crackling of the flames
awoke the family and they has barely
time to escape in their night clothes.
The flames from the Smith house
set the Benedict house on fire and that
in turn ignited Mrs. Cowen's house
but the firemen saved that with the
chemical engine. The Benedicts saved
most of their furniture, but the
Smith's lost most of all.
Mr. Warden told me that he intends
to resign from the Chapel Committee,
also from the Entertainment Committee
of the Ladies Union. I hope he will
not. It is all on account of the piano
trouble.

03\02\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather to day has been very good
considering the time of year.
Told Mr. Able of Mr. Warden's intended
resignation. He thinks that every
endeavor should be made to keep him
on till the end of the year.
Mr. Warden called in the evening
and he is a little undecided whether
to resign or not.

03\04{03}\{1898} (Thursday)
The weather to day has been fine and clear
although there was about one inch of snow on
the ground which fell last night, but it had
all gone before noon.
I received two envelopes from brother Fred
who is in Detroit containing newspaper
pictures of the wrecked Maine in Havanna
harbour, also war vessels, guns, arms etc.
In the evening Mary went to the Grange
but I stayed at home as I was very tired
and wished to put in a good day's work
tomorrow. When my wife got home
from the Grange, she was greatly excited
because her brother Wilson L. Pierpont
(who is Master of the Grange) and his wife
Annie (who is Secretary of the Grange)
were in their respective places when
she got there, after a time recess was
declared and she did not see Wilson
or Annie again, but just before the
Grange closed a note was received
by the acting Secretary which stated
that the Master and Secretary had
a new ten pound son.

03\04\{1898} (Friday)
This morning after a breakfast of bread
and milk I went to work, Irving carried
me down to the shop. At noon Pierpont
brought my dinner to me. We have worked
all day on Mr. Gillete's double dump cart.
The weather has been cloudy all day till
about 4 o'clock, it began to snow and now
it is snowing hard and the wind blowing
hard also. Went to bed at 9 o'clock.

03\05\{1898} (Saturday)
Got up this morning a little before six,
had breakfast of boiled beans, got to the
shop before seven and worked as hard as
we could all day on Mr. Gillette's cart
but did not get it finished.
Clyde worked in the shop to day.
Sent Irving down town to Fred Wood's
this forenoon after a bail of hay and
to Hemingway's this afternoon after
a quart of oysters and three pounds
of crackers. Sent Clyde up to Charlie
Moshier's to see about a banjo club that
he had spoken of coming to the chapel to
play next Wednesday evening. Charlie
said that two of the young men would come
and bring their young ladies with them
and wished us to meet them at Haden
Street. I saw by the paper to day that three
men are to start for Klondike Country
from here next Monday to dig for gold.
I would like to note here what is termed
a "good joke" and one of those jokes which
was practices{??}, I remember when I was a small
boy while the war of the Rebellion was in
progress. Billy White lives with his wife
and four children in a shanty like house
in the lots west of the West Wolcott
Road back of the residence of Truman
Kilbourn. They are simple minded
people and do not know of our nation's
present trouble with Spain. Last
Thursday afternoon two young men
of the neighborhood disguised themselves
and went to Billy's house and knocked
at the door. Mrs. White came and they
asked if Mr. White was in. She said
that he was away at work. They then
told her (one of them) them he was Mr. Moor
and was a recruiting officer
for the government from New Haven
and that Billy had been drafted and they
were after him. She swore at them and
said, you can't have him. They said
two of Mr. Kilbourne's sons were going
and that John Gallagher was going
to be Captain. She was frightened and
said, you shan't have my Billy. Just
then her boy, a lad of twelve, came round
the corner of the house and they said
they wanted that boy. She said, you shan't {??} my
boy and she pushed him into the house
and shut the door while she scolded like
a tiger. The boys went away that they
would give her till Monday to get
ready, and then they would come after
them. After they had gone,
she went to see Mr. Gallagher and
found him already gone away. This
{??????} the climax and she went about
the neighborhood bemoaning her faith
and heaping curses upon the head of that
d---{???} Republican President McKindley of
Connecticut who was going to take her
Billy away from her and oblige her to go
out at house work to earn a living.

03\06\{1898} (Sunday)
Got up very tired this morning. After breakfast
of stewed oysters, Clyde went to the Chapel
to show Dexter Northrop about taking
care of it. I spent my time in reading
and cleaned the cellar some, took my bath
and wrote the following note for the Chapel
Committee to sign:
To the Officers and Members of the Ladies
Union of Mill Plain Chapel
We the undersigned Committee
of Mill Plain Chapel Society, having
the sum of fifty dollars ($50.00) which
we wished used towards the purchase
of a carpet for the Chapel, respectfully
gequest that you obtain samples and
prices of such carpets as you think
most fitting for the Chapel.
And after the cost has been
obtained, we will endeavor to procure
the balance needed, if it cannot be
raised otherwise.
Signed, Robert K. Warden
Luther Bradley
Mark L. Warner
Charles S. Miller
I took this document together with
my own bill of $10.00 for janitor
service and left them with Mrs.
Annie Munson who is Secretary
of the Ladies Union.
Went to the Chapel at three
o'clock. Mr. Nichols preached. Collected
$1.58, had a fair attendence.
In the evening I went to Mr. Tucker's
where I stayed till 10 o'clock. When I
came home he came with me across
the lots, it being bright as day.

03\07\{1898} (Monday)
Worked hard all day. Nothing worthy
of note happened that I know of.

03\08\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day the weather has been fine. One
every hand we hear war talk and all
are greatly excited because the government
has appropriated $50,000,000 for cost defense.

03\09\1898 (Wednesday)
This morning I was awakened by the
fire whistle blowing three, which met{????}
exchange place. I looked out the window
then looked at the clock and saw that it
was quarter past one o'clock. Soon after, I
heard another alarm which meant a large
fire, and called out the whole fire department.
I awoke Mary and we looked out
of the window and saw a red spot on
the clouds and soon heard an explosion
and immediately the whole heavens
were illuminated as if by magic. I called
the boys to look at it, and Margaret,
Ruth and Pierpont got up. There was
another explosion and up went a shower
of sparks. It looked as if the whole City
was on fire. I was at a loss to know
where the fire was and as Clyde wanted
to go and find out, so I told him and
Irving to take their wheels and ride
in and see where the fire was and
then come and tell us. They were gone
about two hours. They told us that it
was Trott's Bakery on Spring Street, a
three story brick building and that
the explosions were caused by gas
which they used in making soda water.
In the morning I learned that the
{????} was $50,000.00 and that 1,500 barrels
of flour were lost. The firemen had
a hard time to keep the fire from
spreading to other buildings.
The cause of the fire was as follows,
In one of the upper stories near the elevator
shaft was located the kettel {kettle} where they
boiled the doughnuts and they had
had a fire under it and a boy attending.
The boy went away, the grease boiled over,
took fire and ignited the wood work and
thence the fire. I have almost forgotten
whether I had any breakfast, can't tell
of what it consisted. Pierpont brought
my dinner to me at the shop. Worked hard
all day finishing up work and cleaning
out the shop. Had dried boiled peas for
supper, and then went to the Chapel
to the Supper and entertainment given
by the Ladies Union of Mill Plain.
The supper consisted of oysters cooked
in various ways for which a charge
of 20 cts. was charged. Then entertainment
consisted of 1. Recitation by Arthur
Heaton, 2. Violin Solo by Mr. Stoton, Miss
Edith Burnett accompanying him on the piano,
3. Messers Sincaster and Leonard on Mandolin
and Guitar, 5. Recitation by George Byam,
6. Recittion Mrs. J. G. Byam. The musicians
were recalled several times. When we came
home we brought Mrs. Able and Mrs.
Morrow with us in the wagon, it being
very muddy. To bed at 11.30 o'clock.

03\10\{1898} (Thursday)
To day the weather has been fine, got up
at 6 o'clock and wrote the following notice
for publication in this evening's American.
The Supper and Entertainment given
by the Ladies Union of Mill Plain Chapel
last evening was a decided success.
The entertainment program was a{??} very
pleasing and well received. Mr. Staton's
violin solo was som much appreciated that
he was recalled and responded with other
selections. Miss Edith Burrett was his
accompanist. The selections rendered
by Messers Sincaster and leonard on
mandolin and guitar received a warm
encore and they responded with other
fine selections. The recitations by
Master George Byam was warmly
applauded as were the others of Arthur
Heaton and Mrs. Byam.
Mary or{??} I did not go to the Grange.

03\11\{1898} (Friday)
Mr. Phalen of Long and Phalen called
this afternoon to see me about renting my
shop, told him that I would rent it for $25.00
per month and he could make what he could
off from that. We agreed to rent it for
$30.00, he to have $5.00 and I $25.00, he to do all
the business, sell the stock tool etc. at
an inventory price and turn the money
over to me.

03\12\{1898} (Saturday)
This forenoon I sent a note to Mr. Tucker
asking him how his neck was, as he had a
carbuncle, he sent word by Irving to have
me come and {???} care of him for the night.
I went and found that Dr. Axtelle and Anderson
had cut it open in the morning. I waited
on him during the night. He was out of
his head the early part owing to the
ether he had taken but was not rational
the last part. I would note here that
I worked this forenoon in my own shop
and I expect it is the last half day's
work that I will do for customers as
I expect to go to work for the Mattatuck
Company next Monday.

03\13\{1898} (Sunday)
I stayed with Mr. Tucker to day which
is Sunday. Had breakfast with the
family. John and Ed Pierpont called
in the afternoon, as did Mr. Otis Northrop
also at evening. Mr. Tucker is getting
along very good.

03\14\{1898} (Monday)
Had breakfast at Mr. Tucker's this morning,
after which I went to my shop and
hung up Mr. Lawlor's, Mr. Tucker's
Arthur Pierpont's and Dr. Ward's
wagons. At half past twelve I went
to work at the Mattatuck Shop at
setting up machinery and doing other
odd jobs. In the evening I went to
Major Tucker's and dressed his neck.
I would here note that as I was coming
home from Mr. Tucker's I saw the
Northern Lights shine brighter than
I ever saw them before. They were in
the shades of Blue, White and Red.
It is an old saying that they are a
sign of war and certainly they were
bright enough to mean something.
I have heard the Old Folks say that
the year before the Civil War began
they seen{??} frequent and of brighter
hues than they have been seen since.
Whether they are a sign of war or
not, I think that was will soon be upon
us.

03\15\{1898} (Tuesday)
Went to work at the Mattatuck Shop
this morning. This noon Joe Huey called
me out of the shop after dinner and
told me that Mr. Tucker wanted me
to come to his house right away
and fix the bandage on his head and
neck. He had been to Dr. Axtelle just
before noon and had it done up
but it failed to stay.
I put it on and it stayed all right.
I went up again in the evening and
stayed with him all night. In the
morning he seemed much better.

03\16\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather has been fine today
and the frogs can be heard peeping.
They were first heard Sunday.
Worked to day at the Mattatuck Shop.

03\17\{1898} (Thursday)
The weather has been fine today. This noon
Mr. Tucker asked me if Wilson Pierpont's wife
was dead. He said that Mrs. Dickinson
heard the little French girls ask Ausin{??} B.
Pierpont how she was and he only said a
few words and they {???} oh isn't it too bad, so
she{???} judged that she was dead. I went and
asked Paul Hesphelt and he said that she
was. It seems that she died at about 8 o'clock
this morning. She was 39 years old, the same
age of myself. She leaves an infant child
and six children.

03\18\{1898} (Friday)
The weather has been fine today.
They have appointed the funeral of
Mrs. Wilson L. Pierpont to be held in
the Chapel Sunday afternoon at 3
o'clock.
Irving took Dr. Ward's Phaeton Carriage
home this morning.

03\19\{1898} (Saturday)
The weather this morning was very
dull and foggy and at about 9 o'clock
it began to rain and continued to
rain hard for about two hours and
a half. I have worked about the Mattatuck
shop at odd jobs all day, i.e. making
a belt tighten, took down a countershaft
and tightened a pulley on it, and worked
making a bench in the blacksmith shop.
Went down town this evening and
got a pair of overalls for which I paid .40
cts. and also went to see Mr. Jones about
the Insurance on my shop. Came
home and went to bed at about half
past ten. It soon began to lighten {lightning}
and thunder and there was quite
a shower, the first this year.

03\20\{1898} (Sunday)
Got up at eight o'clock this forenoon and
the boys and myself went to my shop where
we stayed till about ten o'clock when we came
home and had breakfast of stewed oysters
after which I wrote and read till one o'clock
when we got ready and went to the Chapel
to Mrs. Wilson L. Pierpont's funeral.
This I think was the longest funeral
ever held in the Chapel, all the seats being
filled as well as all of the standing room
being taken and a great crowd outside
who could not get in. Rev. Mr.
Buckley of Trinity Church officiated.
The pall bearers were Arden Coe
John Gallagher, Arthur Pierpont,
Thomas Melbourn, Harry Coe and
John Todd. It was a grange funeral
and the grangers came from neighboring
towns. There must have been
over 400 people present.
After supper went to Major
Tucker's. Had been there a short time
and was sitting in his room up stairs
reading, when we heard a loud noise
in Mr. Parsley's room. Mr. Tucker
knocked on the door and hearing
nothing opened the door and looked
in. He called us{??} in alarm and I went
and we found Mr. Parsley (the school
teacher) lying on the floor unconscious,
the blood running from his mouth
and nose. They called Dr. Ward soon
as possible and it proved to be a fit.
After about 15 minutes he recovered
consciousness and we put him to bed. He seemed
much better. I stayed with Mr. Tucker all night.

03\21\{1898} (Monday)
Worked to day at the Mattatuck shop
in the forenoon making a bench in the
blacksmith shop. At noon Mr. Brower{??} came
and we went to work making steel buttons
on his new press, which strikes 116 times
per minute and makes three buttons at every
stroke or 348 buttons of steel per minute.
The weather has been damp and it has snowed.

03\22\{1898} (Tuesday)
The weather to day has been dull and it
snowed very hard at noon.
The old Hobert{?} Austin place at East Farms
burned last night. It is supposed that
it was set on fire. It was owned by Mrs.
Margaret Bonette.
Wrote a notice of the young men's supper
to be given in the Chapel on Wednesday
evening, to be published in the American.

03\23\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather to day has been better
than yesterday, but still it was dull
some of the time. Went to night to
the Chapel to the supper and entertainment.
There was a large crowd there.

03\24\{1898} (Thursday)
Weather to day has been cool.
Mr. Tucker told me today that Mr.
Parsley is going to give up the school.
He has rented a farm in Washington
and is going farming. He is a fine
teacher. Mary went to the Grange
tonight.

03\25\{1898} (Friday)
The weather to day has been fine and
springlike. Bluebrids and robins have
been singing, the grass is turning green
and it now looks like an early spring.
To night the young folks are having
a dance at John French's and some
of the older ones are having a party
at Ed Todd's. Joe Huey has my
horse and has taken Miss Fatem{??} and
my sister Cara. Hiram Able called
this evening and wanted to know
what I though of Mark Warner and
Miss Fatem{??} taking the money that
Mrs. Phillips raised to buy books with
to buy ice cream for the children the last
day of school. I like to have the children have
a good time, but think the books of more
consequence. Mrs. Andrew Reid of Niagra
Street was burned to death this afternoon,
her dress catching from a bonfire in
her garden.

03\26\{1898} (Saturday)
The weather to day has been fine. The
buds are bursting on my plum trees
and trailing arbutus{??} is blossoming out.
Great excitement prevails to day throughout
the nation on account of the naval
board's{????} report regarding the blowing up
of the Maine Man-|of-|War in the harbor
of Havanna by which 264 men lost
their lives. The report was made public
yesterday, and is to the effect that
the Maine was blown up by a
submarine mine and holds
Spain responsiable {responsible}. Our government
has requested Spain to withhold her
torpedo flotilla now enroute from
the Canary Islands to Cuba. This
she has refused to do and war seems
immediate. The Government is
working night and day fortifying
New York harbor and are going
to erect batteries at New Haven
and Bridgeport. Orders issued
to day directing one old stile {style} moniter{??}
to Portland, Me. and two to Boston.
Mr. James Porter was 80 years old to
day.

03\27\{1898} (Sunday)
The weather to day has been fine and clear.
Went to the Chapel. Dr. Davenport
preached. There was a large attendence.

03\28\{1898} (Monday)
Saw a rainbow in the West this morning
while I was coming home from Mr. Tucker's
where I stayed last night.

03\29\{1898} (Tuesday)
The weather to day has been damp
and rainy. Mr. Fred Parnclee{??}, agent
for L.L. Ensworth called on me to day
and I payed him five dollars on the
account I owe Mr. Ensworth of Hartford.
Mr. Warden and his wife called
on me at my shop, (where I and the
boys were sawing wood this evening)
and told me that Mrs. Warden and my
mother and Mrs. Meatt{??} had been to look at carpets
for the Chapel.

03\30\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather this forenoon was
wet but a noon it cleared up and
was nice this afternoon. Mrs. Hattie
Austin and Homer Twitchel were
married to day, and have gone
south on their wedding tour. He
is about 74 years of age and she
is 47. Mr. Warden called this evening
and told me that he and his
wife have been to town and bought
the carpet for the Chapel. It cost
67 1\2 cts. a yard.

03\31\1898 (Thursday)
It began snowing this morning at
six o'clock and snowed till noon, when
it cleared up and the sun came out bright.
This evening it is growing colder.
Had breakfast of codfish, then went
to work. Mr. Leach came to work on
the nail machines this morning
in the place of Carlie Dec{??} who has
got through. Dewitt Larahee{??} of
Southington got through to day.
Went to night to the Chapel to let
in some men who were coming to
measure the floor for the carpet. They
were to be there at 8 o'clock , waited till
half-past eight and they did not come.
Then went to Mr. Rodier's with a
petition to have the Traction Company
extend their lines to the Grange Hall
and he signed it, then went to Mr.
Gallagher's, from thence to Mr. Hurlbert's,
thence to Mr. Atkinson's thence to Mr
Spender's, thence to Mr. Jones', thence
home, and to bed at ten o'clock.

04\01\1898 (Friday)
Got up at 5 o'clock. Breakfast of bacon
and eggs. Weather to day has been
clear and cool. Left the shop this afternoon
and went to the factory of the
Waterbury Brass Co. where I got sixteen
names on the petition to have the
trolley line extended, in the evening
went with the petition to Mr. Augustus
Moshier's and from thence to Mr.
Theodore Munson's thence to Mrs.
Charles Frost's and Warren Hitchcock's
thence to John French's thence to
Hiram Able's, thence to Walter Garrigus',
thence Mr. Andrews, thence
to Robert Hotchkiss on the Cheshire
Road, thence to Mr. Lee's, thene to
Robert Barrett's, thence to Mr. Andrew's
at the Wedge Place, and Mr. Blackburn's
thence to Morris Reid's, thence to
Henry Wedge's, then home and
to bed.

04\02\{1898} (Saturday)
To day the weather was clear and cool
this morning but at noon it began to
rain and later it turned to snow.
Clyde and Irving started at a little
before seven this morning with their
bycicles {bicycles} and went to East Farms where
they met Mort Pierpont, Clarence
Warden, Burt Pierpont and then
they all went to Meriden thence
to Chshire thence to Roaring Brook
in Cheshire and from there home,
the whole being 33 miles.

04\03\1898 (Sunday)
To day the weather has been very
cold. Frank and Mr. Lounsbury called
to see me this afternoon.
Had to act the part of janitor at
the Chapel to day, as Dexter Northrop
is sick.
Went and stayed with Mr. Tucker
tonight.

04\04\{1898} (Monday)
The weather has been cold and damp
all day. Went out this evening with
the petition for the extension of the
troley track. Went to George Johnson's
first and thence to Frank Judd's, thence
to Luther Bradley's, thence to John
Reid's, thence to Mr. Rudolph's, thence to
Mr. Hock's, thence to Prime Lyman's{??},
thence to Robin{??} Scott's (widow of Edward),
thence to Wilson Pierpont's, thence to
Charlie Brown's, thence to George Benham's,
thence to Sidney Bronson's, thence to
Robert Warden's, thence to Milan Northrop's,
thence to Ed Wetton's and from thence home
and to bed, having procured in all 206 names.

04\05\{1898} (Tuesday)
It began snowing at about six o'clock this
morning and has kept it up all day with much wind.

04\06\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather to day has been cold and disagreeable.
It began snowing hard at about 5 o'clock this
afternoon and continued about one hour.
The papers stated to day that the Spaniards
had a ship chase an English merchant vessel
and fire on her, thinking her to be an American
vessel. It happened off the coast of Spain.
To night went to the supper and entertainment
at the Chapel. The supper was in {the} charge
of Bertha French and Fannie Hitchcock, assisted
by Edith Pierpont, Mattie Judd, Nellie Cass,
Olive Able, Lena Hurlbuert, Hattie Kilbourn,
Clara French, Adaline Marrow, Daisy hall,
Ida PSender, Hattie Colkings[??}, and Minne
Judd.
The entertainment program was a very
pleasing one and well received. Miss
Sadie Haywood's piano solo was warmly
applauded. Miss Nellie Andrew's song was
som much appreciated that she was recalled
and responded with other excellent ones.
Miss and Miss Haywood's duet
pleased everyone and won applause, as did
Miss Susie Bronson's and Miss Haywood's
recitations.

04\07\{1898} (Thursday)
The weather to day has been cool but
fairly clear.
Great excitement prevail throughout
the land on account of the war.
To night I took the Traction Petition
and went about Mill Plain, first
to David Shannon's, thence Mr.
Aitchenson's where his wife was
putting a baby to bed, thence to
Mr. Lockhart's who is newly married,
thence to Oscar Farichild's whose
wife is sick with a new baby, thence
to Mr. Price's where Mrs. Price was
putting a baby to bed, then up stairs
to a German's where the woman
had a half dressed baby in her lap, thence
to Frank Welton's where they have a pair
of young twins, thence to Mr. Twiss,
where Mrs. Twiss was undressing a baby,
thence to Mr. Thackeries, an old couple
thence to Daniel Squire's where they
had a baby, thence to Mr. Gillette's where
they would not let me in on account
of Mrs. Gillette being sick with childbirth,
thence to Mr. Dee's, an old couple,
thenc to Mr. Heaton's where I did
not go into the house, thence to Mr.
Strobell's where hey had a young baby,
thence to Ned Pritchard's, they are
to old to have babies, thence to Mr.
Chapman's whose wife will have a
baby soon, thence to Mr. William
Blewitt's whose wife has a baby,
thence to Peter Lund's where I saw
no baby, thence home and to bed
with the thoughts in my mind that
Mill Plain is a very prolific neighborhood.

04\08\{1898} (Friday)
To day is Fast{??} and is a legal holiday.
I worked in the Mattatuck shop cleaning
shafting{??} pullies. The war indications
are more threatening to day.
This evening I went with the Electric
Rail pettion first to Mr. Leache's at
the head of the Brass Mill {????} thence
to Miles Pain's on East Mountain, thence
to Willis Lannsburie's, thence to
Mr. Bailey's, thence to Mr. Johnson's,
thence to Gilbert Hotchkiss's where
I passed a great fire on the way
on the North side of the Polk Hill, thence
to Mr. Frank Thompkin's thence to
Mr. Freeter's{??}, thence to James Cass,
then to Frank Cass', thence to
Earnest Welton's on the Woodtick
Road in Mill Plain where they had
a baby sick with the croup, thence
to F. B. Haggett's where Earnest
Robinson signed it making the
306th name, then home and to bed.
Clyde and Irving went to Wolcott
and got Mr. Gardener's wagon.

04\09\{1898} (Saturday)
The weather to day has been warm
and fine and some of the farmer's
are plowing. This evening Margaret
and I went with the petition first
to Mr. Norton's on the Woodtick
Road. They were not at home, thence to
Miss Welton's, thence to Mr. Durant's,
thence to Widow Merritt Scott's thence,
to Widow John Frisbie's, thence to
Gayland Alcott's, thence to Mark
Warner's, thence to Richard Potchen's,
thence to George Pritchard's, thence
to Mr. Mc Cauley's, the road was
very dark, thence to Mr. Blewitt's,
thence to Mr. Norton's and to
Mr. Barner's who lives by the twin
bridges, thence home and to bed.

04\10\{1898} (Sunday)
Sabbath day, prepared the Chapel for
service for Dexter Northrop who is sick,
then saw Mr. Tucker on the way home
and asked him if he would rent me
a piece of ground on which to
plant potatoes. He said he would
and ageed to let me have a piece
in the Sherman Bronson lot next to
the Doolittle Road, and I understand it
was to be free of charge.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon
and heard Mr. Waltros of Wolcott preach.
He spoke to considerable length of our
nation's trouble with Spain and of
the suffering Cubans, but prayed
that war might be averted. On my
way home, I saw Mr. Tucker and he
hitched his horse and carried me
to Milan Northrop's at East Farms
thence to George Hitchcock's and George
Alexander's on the Meriden Road.
Then we hurried home as it was
thundering and lightening and we
expected rain, but non came till
evening when it rained quite hard at
about 9 o'clock. I stayed with Mr. Tucker all
night.

04\11\{1898} (Monday)
To day the President of the United
States (Mc Kinley) sent forth his
message to Congress, stating that the
blowing up of the Maine in Havanna
harbour showed that Spain was no
longer able to afford safety to the
ships of other nations in her harbours
and that Cuba must be freed and
the war there must be stopped.

04\12\{1898} (Tuesday)
The weather to day has been fine.
Charles Hotchkiss began working
all night on the nail machines at
the Mattatuck shop, expect to run
the machines to the first of June.
To night after work, I went to my
own shop and loaded a load of iron
and had Father come up and I
entertained him while the folks
got a surprise supper ready for
him, at which all his children and
grandchildren (excepting Fred and
his family) sat down, the occasion
being Father's 68th byrthday {birthday}.
Heard sister Iva say to day
that she was engaged to be married
to William Gillette.
The Waterbury Wrench Co. made
an assignment to day. W. H. Brooks
was appointed receiver{??} under a bond
of 20,000 dollars.

04\13\{1898} (Wednesday)
To day the weather has been
fine. Much talk of the war with Spain.
Went to night and helped Hiram Able
fix the side seats in the Chapel so they
could get the new carpet under them.
Received my week's wages of the Mattatuck
Co. to day. Mary and some of the
other women of the neighborhood
cleaned the Chapel to day and got
it ready for the new carpet.

04\14\{1898} (Thursday)
Went to the Grange to night.
B. F. Hoggett was elected Secretary
in the place of Mrs. Wilson L. Pierpont,
deceased. Rained lightly when
we came home.

04\15\{1898} (Friday)
It has rained most of the day.
Mother is sixty four years old
to day. Went to the Brass Mill and
bought one 12 inch brass kettle for
the Mattatuck Co. for 80 cents.

04\16\{1898} (Saturday)
The weather to day has been fine.
Drew a load of tools from my shop
and put them in the cellar.
The new carpet is put down in the Chapel.

04\17\{1898} (Sunday)
The weather to day has been the best
this year. Grass is turning green and
the buds are ready to burst on plum
and pear trees. Cowslips are in blossom.
Did not go to the Chapel, but Mr.
Mc Kinley preached.

04\18\{1898} (Sunday) {Monday}
The weather to day has been fine.
Every body is talking war.

04\19\{1898} (Tuesday)
It has rained most of the time to day.
Congress sent to day its final message
to Spain and if the terms are not complied
with, the Government are to send
a fleet and an army to Cuba to stop
the war there. A call is expected from
the President for 80,00 volunteers.

04\20\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather cleared this forenoon
and the evening was fine. We all went
to the supper and entertainment at
the Chapel, which was well attended
and about $10.00 were realized{?????}.
The entertainment program was pleasing
to all. Miss Nellie Andrews, Solo. "The
Wreck of the Battle Ship Maine", was
received with a burst of applause.
The duets by Miss Minnie Baker,
Miss Margaret Hunter and the
Misses Haywoods were warmly
encored.
The solos by Miss Sadie Haywood,
Robert Streeter, Jessie Bamatyne{??},
Miss May Reeds, Mr. Arthur Beach,
Miss Elsie Pollack and Lillie Proctor
were very pleasing and warmly
applauded as were the recitations
by Miss Pollack, Miss Susie Price,
and Sadie Haywood.

04\21\{1898} (Thursday)
The weather to day has been cold
but no storm.
Mr. Gillette, a machinest at the
Mattatuck shop has moved into
one of the houses on Southmade Road
to day next to William Dunworth.
Walter Garrigus' wife has been sick
since Sunday.
To day brings the news that
the Spanish Government has not
waited to receive the Ultimatum
sent by this government, but as
soon as they heard that Minister
Polo had received his passport from
this country, considered it as equivalent
to a formal declaration of
war and have sent a powerful
fleet of battle ships to sea. It is not
known whether they expect to proceed
to the West Indies or to operate
against New york or some other
Northern port. I expect to hear tomorrow
that the call is issued for
80,000 volunteers. I think that the
government could raise an army
of 1,000,000 men easy.
My wife has gone to the Grange
and Mrs. Mulvanney{??} called, as she
and I went to school together when
we were young. We had a very
pleasant time recalling events
that happened at that time, when
the Old War was raging.

04\22\{1898} (Friday)
The weather to day has been fine.
Great excitement prevails to day
on account of the war. At 5.45. o'clock
this morning the war fleet left Key
West for the blockade of Havanna
and the North coast of Cuba.
The president has signed a bill
calling for 100,000 volunteers to serve
for one year. Connecticut's number
to be sent is 1,286 men. This morning
the Cruiser Nashville captured a
Spanish lumber ladened vessel bound
from Mississippi to Engalnd and took
her as a prize to Key West.
Manville Norton of Wolcott was buried
to day in the Woodtick burying ground.
He died on the 20th {???} of a cancer in
the stomach. Had school meeting to
night to consider buying a piece of land
adjoining the back side of the school yard
of Henry Hall. I did not attend.

04\23\{1898} (Saturday)
This day is an eventful one. The Waterbury
Evening American's heading was
as follows, A Spanish Freighter Captured
Our speedy cruiser New York saw
her and raced off after her, sailed{??}
{????} across her bows, stops her.
The President Has Issued a Proclamation
for 125,00 Volunteers To Serve
For Two Years
The owners of the Buena Ventura
captured by the Nashville are very indignant
and have entered a protest.
In Madrid they call it an
act of Piracy. Latest news from
Havanna, how the people feel about the
Yankke fleet in the {??????} - General
Blanco active in rushing troops to the
weak points on the coast of Cuba.
Our fleet of Gunboats reached Havanna
at 5 o'clock last evening, and at once
there was great excitement in the
city. General Blanco is rushing troops
to Morrow Castle and to the Batteries
of Santa Clara.
Here In Waterbury 48 men enlisted
in Company A and Company G making
two full companies of 84 men
each. They are expecting marching
orders at any time and are ready
at an hour's notice, the 48 enlisted
last evening.

04\24\{1898} (Sunday)
Weather to day is very rainy, went
this morning to the Mattatuck factory
and telephoned to the Rev. Mr. Davenport
about preaching at the Chapel.
He would come out but had a very
bad throat and did not know whther
he could preach or not. I asked him
if we could not get some one else for
to day and make it easier for him.
He said that he thought that we could
get Mr. Nichols, Baptist Minister
of Simonsville and saw Mr. Nichols
and he said that he would come.
I in the afternoon went to the
Chapel and found that all was well
and Mr. Nichols was preaching,
and a very fine service, the new
carpet was on the floor and looked
very nice. I stayed with Major Tucker
last night.
I would state here that the Rev. Asher
Anderson of Meriden, Chaplain of
the Second Reg., C.N. G.{??} preached
a war sermon to Companies A and
G last evening. The Church was filled
to the extent that no more could
get in. The service was held in
the first Congregational Church
and great enthusiasm prevailed.
The soldier's war cry is to be
Remember the Maine.

04\25\{1898} (Monday)
The first shots of the War were fired
Saturday night from Morow Castle
at the torpedo boat, Foot{??}, and at the
Battleship New York, but failed
to hit anything but the Atlantic
Ocean.

04\26\{1898} (Tuesday)
The light-house tender Mangrove captured
the Spanish Cruiser Panama{??} yesterday
off Key West.

04\27\{1898} (Wednesday)
To day the First Reg. C.N. G. received
orders at 4.45 o'clock to prepare for war.
(this is all that I know)

04\28\{1898} (Thursday)
The weather to day has been cold and
stormy, snow, sleet and rain.
They had a Grange meeting to night
and Edith Pierpont was elected Secretary.
There was but 15 present.

04\29\{1898} (Friday)
Although the weather to day has been
fairly good, I am suffering great pain.
Before dinner Mr. Tucker told me that
we would go over to my shop and blue{??}
some steel buttons. As an experiment
we tried blueing{??} them in powdered charcoal.
The process is as follows, the buttons
are first hardened, then polished and then
drawn to a temper of blue by putting them
in a long cilender {cylinder} with brass chips usually
which is over a charcoal fire while in
motion till the right color comes when it
is dumped on a riddle and the buttons riddled
out of the charcoal. To day we tried the charcoal
instead of the brass and as I was emptying
them out, the charcoal dust exploded like powder
and knocked me backwards, badly burning
my hands and the side of my face.
To day Mr. Judd gave me my insurance
policy on my shop for $1,000 at a rate 1 1\2 cts..

04\30\{1898} (Saturday)
To day the weather has been fine. I not being able
to work in the shop did nothing most of the
forenoon but tend my burnt hands, but a
little before noon I and Clyde and Irving began
drawing out the wood across the road west of
my house and we kept to work at it till near
4 o'clock when Mr. Tucker sent Paul Hesphelt
after me to come to the shop, as a Mr. Simpkins
of Thomaston was there to show me how to "blue
buttons". I went down and staid till five o'clock
when I came home and drove to Bucks Hill to
see the inside of the Chapel there, to see if
we could give the drill there next Wednesday
evening. Thence home and I sent Clyde and
Irving and Margaret and Ruth to the Chapel
to practice the drill.

05\01\1898 (Sunday)
To day the weather has been fine and
clear. Mr. Warden called on me to see me
about the drill at Buck's Hill. Mr. Tucker
called and asked me to go to ride with him
to see Ed Holmes who lives on the Southington
Mountain. I went with Mr. Tucker and
Horace{??} went horse back on his new horse.
This was the first time that he ever rode horse
back very far. After I got home Father, Frank
and Rolland Jenner called, was glad to see
them.

05\02\{1898} (Monday)
Mort Chandler who lives in prsopect
cut his throat open with a razor yesterday
and although he severed the jugular
vein, strange to say he still lives.
Admiral Dewey{?} gave the Spanish
fleet battle yesterday, before Manilla
in the Phillipine Islands. He sunk
several vessels and drove the rest back.

05\03\{1898} (Tuesday)
The young people of Mill Plain went
this evening to Bucks Hill and gave
an entertainment in the Chapel. It
consisted of readings, recitations,
music and a drill and dramatic
sketch entitled America. We had a
fine time and returned home at 12
o'clock.

05\04\{1898} (Wednesday)
Our Chapel had a supper and entertainment
this evening which they
say was fine. I did not go as my
burnt hands were so painful that
I thought I had better stay home and
go to bed.

05\05\{1898} (Thursday)
Weather was very unpleasant. Mary
went to the Grange to night and
Clyde and myself did up my hands
which were very painful, so much so
that it is hard for me to write.

05\06\{1898} (Friday)
Old Mrs. Samuel Munson was
buried from the mill Plain Chapel
to day. I signed her will about
one year ago. She was aged 81 years
and 4 months.

05\07\{1898} (Saturday)
The people are greatly stirred with
enthusiasm over the official
statements that have come to day that
Commander Dewey has won a
great vistory over the Spanish fleet
at Manilla in the Phillipine Islands.
He has sunk eleven vessels and killed
300 Spaniards and wounded 400 more.
His own loss was 8 men wounded.

05\08\{1898} (Sunday)
To day Clyde, Irving and myself drove
over three mile hill to Break-|neck Hill
thence around the north end of Luossapang{??}
Lake in Middlebury and through
the White Deer Rocks to Woodbury,
thence to Southbury, and home
the whole being about 35 miles. It
rained some of the time and this
afternoon it snowed the biggest flakes
I ever saw.

05\09\{1898} (Monday)
The weather to day has been fine.
To night Clyde and Irving and I
finished plowing for potatoes at
the Sherman Bronson lot.

05\10\{1898} (Tuesday)
Fair weather to day. We harrowed
the potato lot to day.

05\11\{1898} (Wednesday)
To day after work in the shop Clyde
and I plowed the drills in the potato
lot.

05\12\{1898} (Thursday)
This morning we planted several rows
of potatoes before I went to work.
To day I fixed the doors and windows
in the house where Mr. Gillette lives
on the Southmaid Road.
News was received to day that the
torpedo boat Winslow was disabled
at Cardenas, Cuba and five
American seamen were killed and
a number wounded.
Worth Bagley, an ensign, was the
first killed and there are the
first killed in the war.

05\13\{1898} (Friday)
The weather to day has been very fair.
Two men came to day from the Eddy
Electric Works of Windsor. Came to
set the new {??????} running in
the Mattatuck shop. I worked with
them.

05\14\{1898} (Saturday)
We finished putting in the {??????}
to day and I am to see to the
running of it. We started it up
to night and it worked very
well.

05\15\{1898} (Sunday)
To day has been very rainy all but
a little while this morning. A great
many bicycle riders rode out of town.
Mrs. Dickinson counted 86 in one
lot going East on the Meriden Road
on their wheel this morning before
it rained, and most of them got
caught by the rain and came walking
back at night all wet and tired.
Went to Mr. Tucker's this evening
and he told me that he was going
to get through at the Mattatuck Shop
to morrow. It was hard news to hear
for he organized the company and
built up the business, and also gave
me my situation there, but some
disagreement between him and Mr.
Wade and Mr. Judd brought it about.
Also his health is very poor owing to
the effects of the carbunckle he has
had on his neck.

05\16\{1898} (Monday)
Mr. Tucker came to the shop to day and
told the people that he had got through. It
seemed to me one of the saddest days I
ever saw, as it made the work of the
rest of us uncertain, besides all liked
Mr. Tucker. Mr. Harry Judd informed
me that they were going to build a
seperate building for me to color the
buttons in and that no one but he
and I were to be allowed in there.
Harry Judd is to take Mr. Tucker's
place. I have also been instructed by
Mr. George Judd to take charge of
the {?????} and run it, no one
else to touch it. This looks as if they
had confidence in my ability.

05\17\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day the weather has been rather cool.
This morning Clyde and I plowed
about two thirds of the East garden
and tonight we finished it and plowed
in the North garden. Clyde and I went
to my shop this morning and Clyde
loaded on to the wagon some rims
and took them to James Harry's in
Cheshire of whom I bought them of
and returned them as I had no use
for them. I worked to day putting
a partition around the {??????}. It
was easy work, but it seemed hard
to me as I had hard headache and
tooth ache. This evening Mr. Tucker
called to see me and I walked home
with him and sat and talked on
the veranda.
He told me that after the buttons
were hardened they roll{??} them for
two weeks in cool ahes and iron
jack stones.

05\18\{1898} (Wednesday)
The weather to day has been cool and clear.
Got up at 5 o'clock and plowed in the North
garden till 6.30 then went to work.
To day the First Regiment Connecticut
National Guard was mustered into the
United States Service and is now
awaiting orders from the government.
To night we finished plowing and
Clyde went down to his Grandma's to
stay over night.

05\19\{1898} (Thursday)
The weather to day has been fine till
about 8 o'clock in the evening when we
had a thunder shower which lasted the
greater part of the night.
Mr. Gladstone, the great English
statesman, died at 5.30 o'clock this morning.

05\20\{1898} (Friday)
To day has been hot. The thermometer
regerstering {registering} 86 in the shade.

05\21\{1898} (Saturday)
The weather to day has not been so
warm as yesterday was. Worked in
the shop all day and would not
have been surprised if I had been
discharged as they have so very little
work for me but very fortunately I
have not been for which I am very greatful.
Paul Hesphelt told me his way
of rooling{??} steel trouser buttons. It
is as follows, first rool{??} them
in coal ashes and water in an iron
barrel for 2 weeks, next in a
wooden barrel while wet with
vienna line, then in wood 8 covered{??}
barrel with cut leather (dry) then
when sorted, rool in bax wood
saw dust a little while, then I
take them and blew them.{???}

05\22\{1898} (Sunday)
To day the weather has been fine and
cool. Went to the Chapel and heard
the Reverend Mr. Davenport preach
a sermon on patriotism. It was
grand. He thinks that the war cry,
"Remember the Maine", is used to much.
He said that the bruised and battered
hulk of the Main, lying so still in
the harbor of Havanna will do more
to bring liberation to the oppressed
Cubans than anything else can.
That God will remember the Maine.
Went to see Mr. Tucker this evening,
came home and to bed at 10 o'clock.

05\22{23}\{1898} (Monday)
A California Regiment left to day
at San Francisco on{??} the City of Pekin{Peking??}
to reinforce Admiral Dewey in
the Phillipine Islands.

05\24\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day Companies K. F. and C.
of the First Conn. Regiment left
Cmap, Haven, at Niantic and
are to proceed to Portland, Maine
via Providence, Boston and Portsmouth,
N.H. To morrow Co. B.
I. and D. will leave for Gul and Plumb
Islands.

05\25\{1898} (Wednesday)
The President has called to day
for 75,000 volunteers to serve two
years or to the end of the war.
Had a meeting at the Chapel
to night and elected officers
for the ensuing year. They were
as follows, Morris Alcott for the
Episcopal denomination, myself
for the Congregational, Luther
Bradley for the Methodist, and
Robert Warden for the Baptist.
Arthur Pierpont was elected Secretary,
Hiram Able, Treasurer,
J. Henry Garrigus, Sunday
School Superintendent and
Henry Cass, Librarian.

05\26\{1898} (Thursday)
The Third Regiment,
Connecticut National Guards
were ordered into camp at
Niantic{??} to day.
Ralph Blakeslee barn and store
house burned this forenoon, it is
located on Meadow Street near the
Nangatuck Raid Road Station.

05\27\{1898} (Friday)
It has rained all day to day. We
have had no clear weather in a
week.

05\28\{1898} (Saturday)
The weather is very damp to day.
Paul Hesphelt's little boy Adolph had
a very narrow escape from drowning
to day. The circumstances are that his
smallest children and my little boy
Pierpont were playing near the upper
dam of the Mattatuck Company's shop
when Adolph said he would go and catch
some foam. He went and sat down over
the gate where the water flows into the
ditch and was catching the foam on his
bare foot when he slipped and fell into
the water. He screamed loud but the
other children were gathering flowers
below the dam and did not hear him,
but his oldest sister was passing from
school on the road above the dam and
knowing the voice hastened to where
he was and found him, floating on
his back round and round. She seized
him and with the aid of some of
the other children, rescued him.

[[05\29\1898 (Sunday) no entry]]

05\30\1898 (Monday)
This morning Clyde and Irving and my
self took the team and starting at about 7o'clock
drove to Meriden 12 miles, thence to Middletown
10 miles, stopping on the way near Black
Pond and eating dinner in the woods.
At Middletown we crossed the Connecticut
River on the new iron bridge, paying 15 cts.
toll, and went to Gildersleeves Landing, 4
miles, thence across the hills to Cobalt,
6 miles, thence to East hampton, 5 miles,
where we stayed over night at the
Village Central Hotel, kept by one
Mr. Malcome. In the evening we went
to the Congregational Church where
they held Decoration Day exercises.
About 20 war veterans marched in
to the church after the rest had been
seated. As they marched, a string band
played "Marching Through Georgia",
after which after which it played the "Star-|Spangled
Banner" and several other national
{????}, the veterans standing during
the playing. The most interesting
part of the service was the reading
of a diary kept {by} Mr. Horatio Chapman
during the war. He was a native of East
Haddam. He is now Chaplain of the
East Hampton Post G. A. R. and is
a fine reader, and read the part taken
by himself from Gettysburg to
Atlanta. I hope that I can hear the
rest sometime. Mrs. Malcome gave
us a room with two beds in it.
Clyde and Irving taking one and
I the other. In the morning we left
at about half past six for Moodus{???}
after paying $1.25, we stopped when about
half way there in a piece of woods
and ate our breakfast, which we carried
with us. We drove right past
Moodus without seeing it. It is
situated in a valley which we went
parallel of on a hill and looking
across seeing no buildings, did not
notice it. After we got a mile past
a man told us of it and we turned
and drove back one mile. They
were having Decoration Day exercises
and the parade was forming. There were
about thirty veterans at the head of
the line, preceeded by a part of the reknowned
Moodus Drum Corps, after which
came about 150 school children carrying
flowers. They marched through the principle
streets of the village and then out to
a cemetery on a high hill near a Methodist
Church where the Rev. Mr. Marshel delivered
an address, and the children decorated the
graves of deceased soldiers. I shook
hands with many of the members
of the Moodus Drum Corps who I
have met in nearly every City in
Connecticut during the past 20 years
of my life as a drummer. Mr. George
Buell, who is a fine fifer, invited us
to Continental Hall to dinner which
was fine and from there to his tin
shop and hardware store, and then
home to his house where we stayed
till nearly three o'clock. He told
us all about the Moodus noises and
described them as sounding
like a person rolling a barrell of
loose{??} iron over an uneven floor
and banging it against the side
of the room. He is fifty years old
and siad that he had heard them many
times. One time the people were in
church and thought that a heavy
team was running away and
that the hub of the wagon scraped
against the side of the church and
banged against the corner board
and tore it off. I would say that
it is 8 miles from East Hampton to
Moodus. On leaving Moodus we
drove to Godspeeds Landing, 4 miles.
(Irving and I, Clyde riding his wheel
most of the entire trip) where we
crossed the rover on a steam ferry,
thence we drove to Shaylerville, thence
to Haddam thence Higgamum, 10
miles from the landing thence to
Durham 10 miles passing through
4 miles of woods without seeing
a building, thence to Wallingford, 9 miles,
thence to Cheshire 6 miles, thence home,
8 miles where arrived at 2 o'clock in the
morning. Mr. Lewis Beckwith moved into
his new house on the Southmaid Road
yesterday.

05\31\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day has been a long one for me
as I have a tired feeling and have had
to work hard.

06\01\1898 (Wednesday)
The weather to day has been nice.
I have been working out of doors
all day moving a coal shed to
make room for a building for
me to color buttons in.

06\02\1898 (Thursday)
To night Mary went to the Grange
and I went to bed at about half
past eight. Mr. Warden called
and wished me to have some tickets
printed for the Strawberry Festival
and entertainment to be given
in the Chapel on June 23.

06\03\{1898} (Friday)
Planted onions in the garden this
morning and plowed out for corn
in the Sherman Bronson lot this
evening.

06\04\{1898} (Saturday)
Planted corn in the Sherman
Bronson lot to day. I call it the
Bronson lot because Sherman
Bronson owned it previous to
1850 and covered it with the refuse
bone from his bone button
factory and cleared the brush and
stones from it. Sherman Bronson
lived where Major Tucker now lives
and his factory stood where the tannery
building now stands. He failed and
Scoville Mfg. Co. took all his real estate
and he went to California but came
back again and died on South Elm
St. about 8 years ago.

06\05\1898 (Sunday)
The weather to day has been fine
and a great number of bicycle riders
were out.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon
and heard Mr. Buckley preach.
Did not get there until the service
was half over.
After service we, the Chapel
Committee, elected Morris Alcott
Chairman.

06\06\{1898} (Monday)
To day nothing worthy of note happened
except that Mr. Harry Judd who
is superintendent of the Mattatuck
Mfg. Co. told me that we would go
over to my shop and color buttons.
We went over and I built a fire
and told him that I was ready to
go to work. He said nothing and
I told him that I supposed he understood
that if I colored the buttons
at all, I should do them alone, and
as I needed no one to help me and
no one to show me, I should do them
alone. he went away and I went to
work.

06\07\{1898} (Tuesday)
This day I got up at 5 o'clock and
Irving and I cleaned the privy out
after which I ate my breakfast and
went to the shop, about 8 o'clock I
took a box of buttons over to my
shop and worked till quarter past
eleven coloring them, after which I
brought them back on a wheelbarrow
and Mr. Judd told me to {do} some job
which took me till noon. The weather
was very hot and I was near melted.
Pierpont brought my dinner
and we ate it together, after which
Mr. Judd told me to go up to the
tannery building and get some
old lumber with which to build
on an addition to the coal sheds.
I got Joe Huey and we went to
my house and got my horse
and wagon and went to the
tannery, carrying Margaret,
Ruth and Pierpont up as we went.
Pierpont went to play with Roy Munson
and Margaret and Ruth to school.
I drove down the East side of the
River to the rear door of the {????} and
loaded on the lumber that was there,
then drove up and across the iron
bridge and down the West side of
the river to the front door when Mr.
Judd came after me to go down to the
shop and show a lot of carpenters about
putting up the shop for blueing buttons.
We set the corners and squared the
frame, the sun being intensely hot, after
which, I went into the shop and worked
the remainder of the day putting up
string pieces on which to hang a
counter shaft, which is to run an energy
grinder. Came home at half past five
o'clock and ate my supper after which I
plowed a piece of ground on which to
plant potatoes for Mr. Mulvaney, after
which I came home and went to bed at
9 o'clock with a pain in my head caused
by the intense heat.

06\08\{1898} (Wednesday)
This morning I did not get up till
6 o'clock, did a little work on the garden
fence, after which I ate my breakfast and
went to the shop, worked till noon putting
up the counter shaft and belts and setting an
energy grinder, and in the afternoon worked
making boxes in which to carry work.
Came home at 5 o'clock and ate my supper
and then plowed drills for Mr. Mulvaney
to plant potatoes in, after which I came
home and planted onions till Mr. Tucker
came. I talked with him a while and went
to his house to look at some business
cards he had received, stayed till half
past 9 o'clock when I came home and
to bed. Received my last week's pay
to day of $10.00.

06\09\{1898} (Thursday)
This morning I got up at 5 o'clock and
planted onions after which we worked
on the garden fence till 6.30 when I
ate my breakfast and went to the shop.
Worked till about 11 o'clock making
boxes after which I went to my home
and got my saws and after filing them
went to building an addition on to the
coal shed. The Waterbury Wrench Co.
finished working to day and are selling
out, came home and finished the garden
fence, and worked till I could not see.

06\10\1898 (Friday)
Got up at 5.30 o'clock this morning, called
Clyde and Irving and we made a path
over to the back lots of Miss Mary
Doolittle's which she has given me
the use of if I will cut the brush on
them by next fall. After we had
the path made we took the horse
over and left him there all day.
Went to work at quarter to seven
and worked all day building an
addition on to the coal shed at
the Mattatuck Drum Shop.
Miss Hine sent me a recipt for $3.00
for money I have paid on George's account.
Mr. Ealcott moved to day into
the second house on the Mattatuck
row.

06\11\{1898} (Saturday)
Got up this morning at 5 o'clock and
got some ground ready to plant
late peas and cucumbers, went to
the shop, worked this forenoon on
coal shed and this afternoon till 4
o'clock when Paul Hesphelt and I
took the governer{??} away from the
waterwheel so that he, Paul, could
pack the gate stem tomorrow.
After work, Clyde and Irving
came with the big wagon and
we went to my shop and got
a load of stuff and a grindstone.

06\12\1898 (Sunday)
Got up this morning at half past six
and set out tomato plants and fenced
about the garden till breakfast time,
after which we went over to the pasture
lot and dug out a new spring near
the path. Near noon Frank called and
brought some tomato plants and we
sat them out. The children, except Pierpont
and Raymond went to Sunday School this
after noon and Mary went to the Chapel
service. I stayed at home and took a bath.
Mr. Garrigus called and asked if I
could not get Mr. Davenport to preach
to the children next Sunday as it
is Children's Sunday. After supper
Mary and I went and saw Mr. Luther
Bradley and he says he is willing
to exchnage Sundays with me so
that they can have Mr. Davenport
next Sunday if we can get him.
Mr. Perrings preached at the Chapel
to day.

06\13\{1898} (Monday)
The weather has been very hot all day.
There has been a land battle between
the U.S. Troops and the Spaniards
on Cuba. This is the first battle of
the war, it was fought and
there were four of our soldiers killed.

06\14\{1898} (Tuesday)
Fourteen thousand troops left Tampa,
Florida at daylight to day for Cuba.

06\15\{1898} (Wednesday)
Got up this morning at four o'clock
and Clyde, Irving and I went to the
Sherman Bronson lot and cultivated
out our potatoes and hoed four
rows, after which I went to the shop
and {am} at work finishing a partition
that I built yesterday for a new
room to put a nail machine in.
Then went over to my shop and
colored buttons till noon. After dinner,
colored buttons till three o'clock then
mad {made??} a door in the new room, then
helped get in the new machine, then
put the lock on door which took till six
o'clock, came home and had supper of
strawberries and bread and butter,
then to hoeing potatoes, then went
to Thomas Heaton's after a bill of
$8.00 he owes me but did not get it.
Mr. Joseph Munger called on me
to day about the interest money
I owe him on my house.
Got my week's pay to day $12.00 at
the Mattatuck Shop. To bed at 9 o'clock.

06\16\{1898} (Thursday)
This morning was very cold, had a little
frost. School meeting was held in the
East Farms district last evening and
Milan Northrop was elected {????????},
Wilson L. Pierpont, Clerk, and
Luther Bradley, Treasurer. Mr.
Freeter's steam laundry on East
Mountain burned this morning at
about eight o'clock. Hiram Able's
people saw it very plain from their
house. Had my house reinsured
for $2,000.00 in the Orient Company
of Hartford, John G. Jones, agent
for three years, expires June 20, 1901.

06\17\{1898} (Friday)
Very hot and dry to day. Old Mrs.
Johnson is very sick, fell off
from a chair and got hurt, she is
now in her 93rd year.

06\18\{1898} (Saturday)
Very dry and hot. It is published
to day that a fleet of 20 ships have
saied from Cadez, Spain and are
headed for the New England
coast. The Third Conn. Regiment
have been ordered to the National
Camp at Ninatic to be mustered
into the Government service. The
first of next week, two companies
of the Fourth Regiment, the Danbury
and Stamford companies
are ordered to Fort Knox at
Bucksport, Maine to fill up
the First Reg. to 12 companies.

06\19\{1898} (Sunday)
The first rain fell to day in the form
of a shower that has fallen in a long
time. I have stayed home all day
till evening when I went to Hiram
Able's then to John French's and
to Mr. Tucker's.
Dr. Davenport preached at the
Chapel because it was Children's
Day. Mr. Frank Cass is very
sick with dropsy, not expected
to live. He worked for me about
three years as a blacksmith's helper.

06\20\{1898} (Monday)
Got up early this morning and
worked in the garden, till shop time.
Worked at the shop putting in a blow
pipe from the boiler shop to the button
hardening shop. Bertha French got
through working Saturday. The girls
that work at the Mattatuck shop now
are Nellie Cass, Mrs. Marrow,
Mary Lyman, and Clara French.
The men are Harry Judd, Foreman,
Mr. Ealcott, George Blanchard,
Joe Huey, Mr. Holden, Charles
Hotchkiss, Mr. Leach, Frank DeBissop,
Paul Hesphelt and myself
and a watchman.

06\21\1898 (Tuesday)
I did not get up this morning until
quarter of six, ate my breakfast of
radishes, bread and butter and canned
salmon and went to the shop, worked
cutting out stones in the pipe trench
to the button coloring shop, and
put the stone underpriming under
the button coloring shop, and laid
a brick floor in a part of it. PIerpont
brought my dinner of fired meat and
potatoes and bread and butter, came
home at 5.30 o'clock and put a sole on
one shoe, and Irving, Margaret, Ruth and
myself pulled weeds in the onions.
Mr. Warden called to see me about the
entertainment for the Strawberry
Festival to be given at the Chapel next
Thursday evening. Mr. Lines and his
orchestra came out to the Chapel this
evening to rehearse but could not
as the piano was pitched to low.

06\22\1898 (Wednesday)
Mr. Francis D. Cass died this forenoon
of the dropsy.
I received my week's pay of the
Mattatuck Mfg. Co., $12.50.

06\23\1898 (Thursday)
Warm and dry, people are beginning
haying. Yesterday a freight train
of 50 cars parted East of the Stratford
draw bridge and as the front section
was crossing the bridge, the
back part ran into it and piled
up three cars high, at the same
time striking the bridge and throwing
it eighteen inches out of
plumb, and making it unsafe
for travel as no trains have
passed over it since. It is expected
that it will take several days to
repair it. This cuts off all rail
road traffic and is a great cause
for inconvenience.
This noon George Cass called at
the shop to see if I would be pall
bearer at his Father's funeral.
Had a grand strawberry festival
at the Chapel to night. The building
was crowded full and the
supper was fine. The entertainment
program was fine and
included recitations by
Miss Deitrish, duets by Mrs.
Lines and Orsgood, solos by
Mrs. Lines and Mr. Alden and
Mr. Orsgood and several selections
by Jack Lines, Orchestra, which
could not be beaten.
Mr. Tucker sent me word that
he wants to see me about the school
meeting, has heard that Mark
Warner has fired Bessie Tyler of
Bucks Hill to teach next year.
Paid Mr. Hine 2.00 for which
she sent me a receipt.

06\24\{1898} (Friday)
To day has been hot and dry.
Mr. Francis D. Cass was buried to
day, at half past two this afternoon
the Rev. Dr. Davenport officiated.
The pall bearers were Thomas Melbourn,
Wilson L. Pierpont, Robert Warden,
Thomas Mills, George Alexander
and myself. He was buried at
the Pine Grove Cemetery.
Yesterday being the last day of school,
they had a school picnic to day which
was held in th grove back of the
school house. After the funeral we drove
up there. They had a large attendence.
Went to Union City to see an English
man who used to live on East Main
St. to see if I could get the recipt for
making lacquer cover steel pens,
buttons etc. Could not find him
but found one Mr. Pratt who was
in business with him and who
claims to have lost a lot of money
by his management, who told me
how the lacquer was made, as
follows, dissolve gum sheel-lack in
alchohol and add naptha, apply in
a dipper's basket and when the
pens are well shook off, turn out
into a riddle on a warm stove
and shake it till dry. Drove home
by way of Platts Mills.
We cleared at the Strawberry Festival
at the Chapel last evening about $50.00.

06\25\{1898} (Saturday)
To day is very hot and dry. Everything
is drying up.

06\26\{1898} (Sunday)
Got up at half past five and watered
plants in the garden, then went
up to Mr. Tucker's and we went and
looked at the old tannery building
with a view to see what kind of
a place it would be to make steel
buttons in, then came home and
had breakfast at ten o;clock of
baked beans, after which, Howard
Neil called to get his Indian relics
which I had. Then Father called
and we drove to John Wakelee's to see
him about cutting his hay, came home
and found Agnes Able here resting after
walking from Mr. Stephen Harrison's on
Walnut street where she works.
Went to the Chapel and heard Mr. Bassett
preach. Came home and had supper
of strawberry shortcake.

06\27\{1898} (Monday)
News has reached us of a battle which
was fought near Santiago de Cuba
at a place called Lo Luasina
last Friday between 1000 troopers
and 2000 troopers Spanish soldiers and
troops fought on foot and lost
17 men killed, 29 wounded and 7
missing.

06\28\{1898} (Tuesday)
Dry and dusty.

06\29\{1898} (Wednesday)
Had school meeting last night
and mark L. Warner was elected
Committe, B. F. Hoggett, clerk
and Warren Hitchcock, treasurer.
It was voed to lay a tax of .05 mills
on the dollar on list of 1897.
The Committee assisted by Mark
Pond were to lay tax.

06\30\{1898} (Thursday)
Parisgreened{??} my potatoes this evening.
Went to the Grange to night.
The weather very hot and dry.

07\01\1898 (Friday)
Weather dry and hot.
I received a tax bill to day for
military tax due May 1, 1897
from Constable Ronnette with
a copy of the law that unless
it was paid by the 6{???????}
he should {????} on my body and
so forth and unless paid. I was
to be delivered to the keeper of the county
jail, there to remain until I had worked
out said tax, together with costs and other
expenses, also a letter from Constable
Ronnette saying that if paid before the
sixth, that there would be no further costs
than the tax of $2.00 and interest and writ
which was $2.00 making $4.00 in all.
News as published to day that Gen.
Shafter{???} has his army of 14,000 men including
5,000 Cubans before Santiago and
intends to attack the town to day.
Aunt Amanda Bronson died in Bridgeport
yesterday, aged 93 years. She is sister
to my wife's mother.

07\02\1898 (Saturday)
Got up this morning at half past five
and worked hoeing in the garden
till 6.30. Ate breakfast of boiled hard
clams and went to the shop. Worked
first whitewashing the forge in the
button blueing shop, also the windows.
Next made a rack in the main shop
for those who ride wheels to keep
bicycles in. Next made some long
shallow boxes, then stopped for 1/2 hour
at noon and ate dinner of corned
beef and biscuit, and worked most
of the afternoon making a cubbard{?}
in the button blueing shop.
Came home and had supper of
boiled beans, after which I hitched up the
horse and Clyde and I went to town. Went
first to the Selectmen's office in the City
Hall to see about the military tax but
they were away. Saw the janitor James
Loughland and asked him who the
past examining surgeon is. He said that
it was Dr. Graves and that he was
over to the armory where they are
enlisting recruits for the Conn. National
Guards. Went thither and saw
Postmaster Fitzpatrick and Captain
Geddes and they told me that Dr.
Graves was at his office in the
Daniels Block on North Main Street.
Went thither and saw him, but he
could do nothing for me as the law
provided that he could examine only
in the month of January. From thence,
I went to see Constable Ronnette and showed
him his bill and letter and told him
that I was exempt of military tax
on account of disability having a
lame foot and two ruptures. He,
seeing my cane, believed me and tore
up the bill and letter, which ended the
matter. I thanked him and told him
if I could help him out some time to
let me know, at which he seemed very
much pleased, for I secured a number
of votes for him at his last election.
Went from thence to Charlie Russell's
store where Clyde bought .50 cts worth
of fire works for the children to help
celebrate the Fourth of July. Came
home and to bed at 10.30.
There was a great battle fought
before Santiago yesterday in which
it is reported that we lost 1000 men
and troops now occupy a position
within two miles of the city.

07\03\{1898} (Sunday)
This has I think been the hottest day
I ever saw. My thermometer has stood
at 102 in the shade most of the afternoon.
The gardens are all wilting, the leaves
on the trees have withered since morning
and a vapor can be seen arising from
the watercarses{??}. There has been a stiff
breeze blowing from the South West
some of the time, but it felt hot as
if coming from the burning sands
of a desert.
On the Fourth of July in 1882 I drummed
in the Mattatuck Drum Corps at
the dedication of the Soldiers
Monument in Birmingham. That
day the thermometer stood 106 in
the shade in Shelton where we
marched, but it was only 98 here
so to day must be the hottest.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Mr. Perry, Baptist, preached.
After supper went to Mother Pierpont's
at East Farms.

07\04\1898 (Monday)
To day is the one hundred and twenty
second anniversary of our nation's
independence, and the words which
John Adams spoke in 1776 are fulfilled
when on July 2nd he said, "We will
make this an immortal, a glorious day
when we are in our graves, our children
will honor it. They will celebrate it
with thanksgivings, with festivities,
with bonfires and with illumination.
On its annual return, they will
shed tears not of subjection and
slavery, not of agony and distress,
but of gratitude, of exultation and
of joy." While the people of to day have
nearly forgotten in a measure the
burdens and distress which burdened
the people in 1776, Fourth of July is
very appropriately observed.
For myself I worked this forenoon
(a thing I never did before) lining up
the main shafts in the Mattatuck
Shop. In the afternoon, Paul Hesphelt
and his boys and I and my boys
went to Scott's Pond fishing and
as the water was low, we caught over
60 fish. Mr. Gilbert Duryee died
yesterday.
There has been alarms of
fire in town to day.
This evening we went up on the
large rock on red oak hill back
of the Doolittle place and watched
the fireworks which were sent up
in every direction. There was lots
of thunder and lightening which
served to make the occasion the
more sublime and it rained a
few drops.

07\05\{1898} (Tuesday)
This day has been one that I shall
long remember. At 10 o'clock, as I had
occasion to leave the shop, I was surprised
to hear most of the whistles and
gongs blowing, and the ringing of
bells and firing of cannon.
This told the people of the victory
of Admiral Sampson over the Spanish
Admiral Cervia near Santiago.
I immediately sent Clyde to notify
the members of the Mattatuck Drum
Corps that there would be a parade
in the evening and that we would
turn out. I stopped work at noon
and came home and got my five
drums in shape and then went to City
Hall and reported to Mayor Spenser
that we would turn out, from thence to
see George Edwards thence to
see Simon Smith on the Middlebury
Road and then home and
loaded seven snare drums and two
bass into my two seated wagon
and took them to Gardener Hall's
store on Cherry Street where we
formed, {????} for fifers, Luke
Henderson, Charles Cass, Simon
Smith and George Edwards. Bass drummers,
Henry Buckingham and Elsie
Bronson. Snare drummers, Mr. Miles
Booth, Hubert Downs, Arthur Harrison
(of Wolcott), George Atkinson, Levi
Grilley and myself. We marched to
City Hall and reported for duty
and were assigned to head Randolph
& Claw's Company, nearly all
of the military and civil organizations
in the city turned out.
The factory whistles blew and
there was a continual display
of fireworks while a cannon on
the top of Abrigador{??} Hill kept
up a constant firing. The center
was thronged with people.

07\06\{1898} (Wednesday)
This morning as I was about to get up
at about quarter to five, as I arose and
turned in bed, my hernia slipped out.
It became rigid and I could not get
it back again. After trying everything
that I could think of, we called Clyde
and sent him after Mr. Roberts who
lives no South Main Street and makes
a specialty of caring for ruptures.
He came a little after seven o'clock
and tried to force it in which pained
me very much, after which he took
a battle of liquid from his satchel
and poured a little on and then with
a slight pressure it went back.
The liquid relaxed the muscles and
let it slip back. He staid and ate
breakfast with me, and I did not
go to work till noon.
Mr. Durce was buried
this afternoon in the Pine Grove
Cemetery. He was aged 76 years.
Cousin Jennie Phillips called this
evening and told me that she was
not going to teach at Mill Plain.


7/07/{1898} (Thursday)
To day is cool and very dry. This
week makes the sixth since we have
had any rain except a slight shower.
Mr. Anderson is building a house
on the Southmaid Road near Lewy
Beckwith's. I worked to day blueing
buttons in the new shop.
Went to the Grange tonight.
The Hawaiian Islands were annexed
to the United States yesterday.

07\08\{1898} (Friday)
The weather to day has been hot and
dry. Worked this forenoon blueing buttons.
Lieutenant Hobson and the
men under his command who
sunk the Merrimack at the
entrance of Santiago harbor
were exchanged yesterday.

07\09\{1898} (Saturday)
We had a thunder shower this morning
that did a lot of good, but it only
rained a little, and the evening is
quite cool.

07\10\1898 (Sunday)
Got up this morning at 7.30 and pulled
weeds in the garden till 9 o'clock
when we went into the house and
as Mary had not got breakfast
ready, we put a pan of baked beans
on the table and ate what we wanted
and cut a watermelon. After breakfast,
we finished pulling the weeds from
the rows that we were working on
before breakfast, after which we got
a joiners bench into the cellar and
repaired a bucksaw frame, then lay
down for a nap but could not sleep
as one fly would fly into my ear
then into my nose and pestered
me other wise so that I was
obliged to get up and fight him,
but as I could not catch him I was
tired of trying to sleep and got ready
and went to the Chapel and heard
Mr. Rafter preach a good sermon.
Mr. Rafter is of the Waterville Church.
After service, Major Tucker called me
into his place where I stayed for some
time and then went to Hiram
Able's and left the $2.33 that was
collected at the Chapel. Mr. Able has
had his house painted. Came home
at six and had supper of baked beans
and salmon and lettuce salad, after which
I got out my old fife books and showed
them to the boys who are learning to
fife. Went to see Mr. Tucker at 8
o'clock and stayed till 11. Came home
round the road{??} and went to bed
at midnight.

07\11\{1898} (Monday)
Nothing worthy of record has happened
to day tht I know of except that
there was a slight frost this morning
and Frank De Bissop got through at the
Mattatuck shop Saturday night.

07\12\1898 (Tuesday)
Mowed this morning from 5 to 6.30
and then went to work in the shop.
This afternoon a constable from
New Haven, one Mr. Kirk, came to
the shop and read a warrAnt for
Mr. Mc Elliott, Mr. Lang and
myself to appear before the Judge
of the Court of Common PLeas
at New Haven tomorrow morning
at 10 o'clock as we have been
drawn as jurymen.
This evening Mary and I
went to see Mr. Harry Garrigus
as I wished to find out about the
duties of a juror. Saw Mr. Tucker
on the road. He told me that he
did not think that the Mattatuck
Co. could live throughout the
summer as the price of furniture
nails has been put down from 55 per
cent discount to 75 per cent.
We stoped {stopped} at Walter Garrigus' and
carried his mother home and brought
her back again when we came home.

07\13\{1898} (Wednesday)
Arose this morning at five o'clock.
It was raining quite hard. Ate my
breakfast and as I was obliged to go
to New Haven to serve on the jury
and had not money enough to go
with, drove to the Brass Mill and
borrowed ten dollars of father.
Then I took the trolley car at the
end of the Plank Road and paid
them five cents for a ride to
the Nangatuck Rail Road depot,
where I paid .80 cents and bought a
ticket to New Haven, the train leaving
at 8.26. Met on the train Mr. Mc
Eliott whom I did not know, but who
used to be third selectman. At New
Haven we took the trolley car to the
cart house, it raining very hard,
fare 5 cents. Arrived there at quarter to
ten. Mr. Edgar Wallace of Prospect
was there with whom I was acquainted
and he told me many things in
connection with the duties of a
juryman. The court was called at
about 10.30 and twenty one jurymen
responded, three being absent, two
on account of sickness and one
being away, and Judge Hubbard
of Middletown dismissed us to
report again tomorrow morning
at ten o'clock. I then went to the
office of the county commisioners
to see a directory as I wanted to
go to the Historical Society's rooms,
found that they were located at
144 Grove Street. I went there, it
was raining very hard, and
saw their fine collection of
relics and ancient documents, fire
arms etc. but did not have much time
as it closed at 12 o'clock. From there
I walked to the depot in the rain
and found that my train would not
leave till two thirty nine so I took
a walk up to the old Derby Rail Road
station. It is now used as a hardware
store house. I then went to
the car shops, bought on the way
five cents worth of peanuts, looked
about there a little while and then
went to the depot and waited for
my train. Bought a ticket to
Nangatuck for 65 cents and there
took the trolley car to Silver Street,
Waterbury to father's where I found Mary
who had been there making over a
pair of pants which Mr. Tucker gave
me. Then went to the Mattatuck
shop and got my pay, 9 dollarsm and
came home, had supper of fired
onions and canned{??} corn after
which I went to Mr. Tucker's, came home
and to bed at 10 o'clock.
Sent my horse to Miles Paynes to day and
had him shod. He charged 1.25. And also
one buggy wheel.

07\14\{1898} (Thursday)
Got up this morning at five o'clock,
had breakfast of pancakes and started
for West Cheshire depot at quarter
past six o'clock. Clyde went with me
to bring the team back and we took
Raymond too. It was a fine morning.
At West Cheshire, I took the 8.26 train
for New Haven and got to the County
Courthouse at a little after nine. We,
the jury men, were called before the judge,
nineteen of us, and seven were
challenged off, the other twelve were
ordered to their seats, and a case
of Mr. and Mrs. John Mc Carthy against
William Nott, all of Ansonia, was called.
The case was two counts against
said Nott, one for selling liquor
to a habitual drunkard and
for selling to a husband after being
forbidden not to by the wife. After
we had heard all the evidence, and the
lwayers arguments, we received
our charge from Judge Hubbard
and were then ordered to retire to
our room. It was then 12.30 and a
recess was declared till two o'clock.
We went and got dinner at a restaurant,
paid 25 cts. for it, after which we
took a short walk and returned to
the Courthouse at quarter before two.
At 2 o'clock we were called to our
seats and the roll called after which
we retired to our room. The first
ballot was 10 guilty and 2 not guilty.
The second, all guilty. Edgar Wallace
was appointed foreman and we
were admitted to our seats in the
court room where we were ordered
to stand while the clerk read the
charge to us and asked if we
found him guilty or not where upon
the foreman answered guilty.
We were then immediately dismissed
to report again tomorrow morning
at ten o'clock.
I went into the criminal side of the
Superior Court where a colored man was
being tried for assualt with intent to
kill a white man, and staid there till
a little after three when I went to the
depot and took the train for Cheshire
at four, paying twenty cents. Clyde
and Margaret were at Cheshire to
meet me and we drove home where
we arrived a little before six.
Went to the Grange in the evening but
did not stay, only till recess when
I came home.
Santiago de Cuba was captured yesterday.

07\15\{1898} (Friday)
Got up this morning at 5 o'clock and
sent Clyde up to Mr. Tucker's and got
his Concord buggy and then we ate
breakfast as soon as we could, and
Irving, Clyde and myself started
for New Haven, leaving at six o'clock.
We went byway of the Notch-|in-|
the-|rock, followed the road
that runs at the foot of the West
Mountain in Cheshire. Came on
to the main New Haven road
at Mount Carmel where, fearing
that I might be late, took the
trolley cars, after waiting a long
while, and reached the court house
at five minutes to ten. Meanwhile,
Clyde and Irving had driven
to the Tantene{??} livery stable and
put the horse out and came to
the Courthouse a little while after
I got there. Soon after ten we, the
jury, were called into the courtroom
and after being impaneled,
six of the 18 present being
excused, the case of the State against
Paul Beetz of Grand Avenue, New
Haven, for selling spiritous and
intoxicating liquors on Sunday and
also keeping a place open Sunday for
the purpose of selling the same, was
called. Gunn of Milford was attorney
for the State and Goodheart for
the defence, he is of New Haven.
Both were expert lawyers and made
good pleas. The jury was sent out
at a little after three o'clock and
after being out over {???}, returned and
reported that we could not agree.
We were sent out again, but after
being out over half an hour were
recalled and the Court adjourned till
a week from next Tuesday at 10 o'clock.
The nearest that the jury came to
agreeing, 4 ballots for guilty and
8 not guilty. This was a case where
I believe that the accused was guilty
but the evidence given (from which
we had to judge) was not sufficent
to make it clear that he was guilty,
therefore my vote was not guilty.
We got out of Court a little after five
and took the trolley cars to Lighthouse
Point to see the new battery which
hs been erected there. We paid ten
cents a piece car fare. The ride was
fine, the view of the water grand.
There were many girls in bathing
which I took much pleasure in watching.
The Battery consists of two
old cast iron smooth bare ten inch
guns, mounted on friction carriage
back of a defense made of rail
road ties and two thicknesses of
rail road iron laid on top length
ways of thw works. It did not look
very substantial.
We came back to New Haven Center
which we reached at 6.50 and got
the horse, paying .50 cts. for its keep
and feed, and started home. Came
through Beteny{??} and Prospect, reached
home at 12 o'clock.

07\16\{1898} (Saturday)
Went to work to day in the Mattatuck
Shop, found that Mrs. Marrow, Clara
French and Mary Lyman had been sent
home on account of not having work
and all of the rest of the hands are very
uneasy and fearful lest they shall be
sent home. Found a letter there from
Dr. G. Porter notifying me to return
to him a mowing machine that I
borrowed of him three or four years
ago. The machine in question I borrowed
and broke. Some time after I went to
Miss Bradley, his house keeper and agent{??},
he being in London at the time, to
get the address of the parties so I could
send and get a casting to repair it
with. She wished me to keep the machine
in payment for service I had rendered
in protecting the trees and bank in
front of Mr. Porter's residence against
being {????????} by the Trolley Company
which it was expected was coming at
that time. I considered it very poor
pay as the machine was almost worthless
and I spent a great deal of time in
looking the matter up enough, had
I received fair pay to have bought
several new mowing machines.
This evening Clyde and I drove to Mr.
Townsend's at Breakneck in Middlebury
to find from Mr. Townsend where
Rachambeam{??} and his army encamped
in 1781 on its march to {????}
Washington on{??} the Hudson.
I had a very nice visit, reached home
at about 10 o'clock.

07\17\{1898} (Sunday)
Got up this morning, had breakfast
of roast clams and baked beans, after
which Pierpont and myself drove to
Southington to see Mr. Bennett
Upson to get information regarding
the visit of General Lafayette at his
grandfather's house in Revolutionary
times and also to Luman{?} Lewis
who is 94 years old to get information
regarding the passage of the French
army through here in 1781 and 1782.
He told me a great deal about it
which people had told him who saw
the. Came home and had dinner
at noon and towards evening
went up on East Mountain to
see Mrs. Gilbert Hotchkiss about
the Richardsons who kept a great
many American soldiers over
night at Breakneck in the
Revolution.
In the evening went to see Mr.
Tucker.
The Rev. Mr. Hanna preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.

07\18\1898 (Monday)
Worked to day most of the time
building a watercloset at the Mattatuck
shop. Walter Garrigus' wife
gave birth to a little girl tonight.

07\19\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day has been very warm. Worked
at the Mattatuck shop. This evening went
to see the Rev. Dr. Davenport at Major
Tucker's to give him information about
the French army which passed through
here under Count Rachambeam in 1781.
Dr. Davenport is to write a paper to
be read before the Order of Patriots and
Founders in Milford (Woodmont) a
week from next Saturday.

07\20\{1898} (Wednesday)
This day has been a hot one. Mr. Tucker
called this evening and told that
he and Dr. Davenport are going
to take a drive to Otis Mass{??} the last
of this week.

07\21\{1898} (Thursday)
To day has been very warm.
George Benham's wife's mother Mrs.
Seinor died this evening at his home
in East Farms of old age. She was
aged 77 years. Mary went ot the
Grange to night. I stayed home and
set a tire on my buggy wheel and
then went to see Father and Mother.
Stayed till ten o'clock then home
and to bed.

07\22\{1898} (Friday)
Got up this morning before five
o'clock and mowed in the swamp
till breakfast. Went to work at
the Mattatuck Shop and helped
Paul Helspelt get a revolving
dryer running, then Mr. Judd
sent us up to the old tannery
building to get the waterwheel
running, I found that the
bulkhead had settled towards
the wheel and that two of the
braces had worked loose and came
out and had caught in the partition
and tore off some of the
boards and these had run into
the cogs{??} and this had moved
the wheel towards the bulkhead
an inch{??} so that it rubbed
so hard that it could not run.
We moved the bulkhead back
and braced it and then moved
the wheel to line, which was no
small job, it being a breast wheel
16 ft. in diamter and 16 ft. long.
Came home at 5.30.
Mary and the smaller children
went to Mr. Garrigus this afternoon
and picked a lot of hillberries
and Clyde and Irving rode
to Campounce{??} this afternoon
and saw the man dive from
a height of 80 ft. into the lake.

07\23\{1898}
Worked all day in the waterwheel
at the tannery building.

07\24\1898 (Sunday)
Got up this morning very early,
had breakfast at 9.30. Mr. Robert
Hotchkiss came and borrowed my
buggy for his wife and daughter,
Flora, to go to Prospect with.
Cousin Charles Phillips came
for me to go down to Father's and
fix his wife's bicycle which I did.
This evening George Edwards
and his wife and son Elton
called.
They had a clambake out{??} to Morris
Reid's to day.
The Rev. Mr. Waters preached at
the Chapel this afternoon.

07\25\{1898} (Monday)
Went to work this { } at the Mattatuck shop
and from thence to the Rutter tannery
and to work in the waterwheel till noon
then back again to the Mattatcuk shop.
Mr. Morris Alcott called and told me that
he would get the Rev. Mr. Buckley to preach
at the Chapel next Sunday.

07\26\{1898} (Tuesday)
To day Irving carried me to the
Nangatuck Rail Road depot where I
took the 8.12 train to New Haven
and went to the Court House where
I arrived in good time.
A case was called against a man
who lives on Putnam Street for selling
liquor on Sunday and without a
license. Gunn of Milfrod was for
the State and C. S. Hamilton of
New Haven for the defense. The case
was not finished at one o'clock and
court adjourned till tomorrow to allow
its members to attend the funeral of
a former clerk who had died.
I went and had dinner and then
went to West Haven and staid
a while, came back and went out an
old long wharf and staid and talked
with an old sailor till train time.
Took the 5.57 train on the Northampton
Road home. Expense - RR fare down .80 cts,
dinner 25 cts, postage stamps 10 cts, trolley
fare to West Haven 10 cts, peanuts .05 cts,
Trolley fare to New Haven 10 cts, RR fare
to Cheshire .40 cts.

07\27\{1898} (Wednesday)
Went to New Haven via Canal Rail
Road. Mr. Bradley of Woodbridge
was sick abed and as he is one of the
jurors on the case which was being
tried yesterday, that case could not
be finished. The clerk dismissed us
for the rest of the term.
After receiving my pay which amounted
to 20.66, I got dinner and waited 4 o'clock
and took train home. Expense - RR fare .80, dinner
25 cts.

07\28\1898 (Thursday)
Went to the Mattatuck Co. shop to
wrok but they had nothing for me
to do as their business is getting
less and less all the time so I came
home and worked most of the day
when it did not rain in the garden.
Mr. Joseph Munger died this
morning early at the New Haven
Hospital where they took him
from the sea shore where he went
last week for his health. He lived
on the Waterville Street and was
aged 60 years.
Mr. Munger has a mortgage
on my house of $1,200 and I owed
him one year's interest whcih
was due June 17. I payed him
10.00 the early part of July and sent
Mary to day with 10.00 more whcih
she payed to Mrs. Munger leaving
52.00 more due.

07\29\{1898} (Friday)
Went to work at the Mattatuck Shop to
day but Harry Judd told me that
they were hung up for something for me
to do so I came home. I think that this
means a final finish of my working
for them and the beginning of the end
of the Mattatuck Mfg. Co.
for I do not believe it possible for
them to run much longer under the
management of the Judds as they
have no mechanical knowledge.

07\30\{1898} (Saturday)
Worked to day cutting brush in the
pasture lot most of the time, had to
stop this forenoon on account of the
heat. The thermometer stood at 97 degrees
in the shade and this afternoon it
rained. Mr. Newell Moulthrop
called this afternoon to see if I
could get 14 drummers and fifers
to play at Compounce some day
in the future. Went and stayed
with Mr. Tucker to night.

07\31\{1898}
Stayed with Mr. George W. Tucker last
night, got up at 7 o'clock and Mr. Tucker
got breakfast as the women and Horace
had gone to Walnut Beach after which
he, Joe Huey and myself ate frankfurts,
cucumbers, rolls, coffee, etc.
after which I read a book (Lord
Chesterfield's Manners) for about
two hours, when I came home and
got ready for Chapel where I went
at three o'clock and heard Mr. Buckley
preach, there was collected $1.51.
After service there was a funeral
service in the Chapel, a son
of Mrs. Fannie Hill, aged 5 years.
James Porter's horse died yesterday.

08\01\1898 (Monday)
Went to the Mattatuck shop this
morning to see Mr. Judd and find
out whether they wanted me to work
any more or not. He said that
they did want me sure, but that
they had nothing for me to do
then, so as I had some work to home I
came and helped Mary wash, then pulled
weed. After dinner, Pierpont, Clyde and
myself went to town and bought some
pine lumber of Tracy Brothers for which
I paid 1.00 for 20 ft. then to Bonner & Preston
and bought 2 gals. of linseed oil for which
I payed .92 cts. thence to Hotchkiss and
Templeton where I got 2 doz 1 1/2 round
head steel screws for which I payed
10 cts, then up to the Old City Mills on
North Main Street to see William Brooks.
I found him painting the inside of the
shop with a paint mixed as folows:
cateine{?} plaster and whiting equal parts
with a little glue thinned with water.
Then we went by Lakewood
and home, after supper I went to
see Mr. Tucker.

08\02\{1898} (Tuesday)
This morning dawned clear and warm.
Went to my own shop with Clyde and
Irving and there met the scrap
iron man from the Waterbury
Scrap Iron Co. and we loaded up
a load of old iron, then we loaded
up a load of tools and a drilling machine
which we brought home.
We worked the rest of the day cutting
brush in the pasture lot.

08\03\{1898} (Wednesday)
This morning I made a tool chest for
Mr. Ealcott{??}, after which I cut brush
all day. The weather was very warm.

08\04\{1898} (Thursday)
Cut brush in the pasture lot all day.
Went to see Cousin Clarissa Curtis of Stratford
and her husband Melville, at Father's
this evening. The Government expects
to bring General Shafter's army north
to Montank Pont on Long Island to
stay through the hot weather. The cause
of it is the numerous cases of yellow
fever which now exist in the army.
It is feared that fully half of the
troops will perish if they remain
in Santiago through the summer.

08\05\{1898} (Friday)
Worked to day mowing grass in the upper
pasture lot.
Went to night to visit Cousin Clarissa
and Melville. Took along several histories
and old books which interested Clarissa
very much as she is a great geneologist.

08\06\1898 (Saturday)
Worked to day mowning and raking
and carting hay from the upper pasture
lot. Had 110 heaps. I could not work
as fast as I liked to on account of a
severe pain in my back and sides.

08\07\1898 (Sunday)
My back pained me so much that I
could not lie in bed this morning as
long as I wished, so got up and stored
away some hay in the barn. During
the forenoon, brother Rolland Jenner
called as he was out with his new bicycle
for a ride. In the afternoon went to
the Chapel with Mary at 3 o'clock, all
of the children except Raymond going
to Sunday school at 2 o'clock. The Rev.
Mr. Faster preached. He is of Newark,
N.J. In the evening Mary and I
went to visit Mr. Tucker. Came home
and went to bed at 10.

08\08\1898 (Monday)
Run {Ran} the washing machine first
thing and got through at about
half past 8 and then went and opened
out the hay and got in two loads
before noon, and got in the remainder
this afternoon.

08\09\{1898} (Tuesday)
Painted the ceiling of the kitchen
and dining room and my room
this forenoon with a water paint
made of calcined{??} plaster and glue
water. This afternoon went over
to Mr. Anderson's new house
to see the Artezan{?} drilling
machine work, then went in
bathing, after which I came
home and painted on the East
end of the house.

08\10\{1898} (Wednesday)
It rained all day to day and I cleaned
the woodhouse, repaired the washing
machine. Harry Kilbourn came
and wanted a plank, which he got
down to the shop. It measured 10 ft.
at .03 cts., 30 cts. I went to the Mattatuck
shop this afternoon and Mr. Judd
told me to come to work tomorrow.
Received a check to day from the
Waterbury Scrap Iron Co. for eleven
dollars and one cent for payment
for 4,405 lbs old iron of 1/4 ct. per
pound.

08\11\{1898} (Thursday)
Went to work at the Mattatuck
shop to day, finished some stoking{???}
boards which were to count out
buttons on.
Mary and I went to the Grange to
night and I read a paper on wide
tires and the wide tire law.

08\12\{1898} (Friday)
Worked to day in the Mattatuck
Co's shop tinkering on various
things. This evening I went to
see Mrs. Able to get a description
of an old Italian woman who
is stealing my potatoes in the
Sherman Bronson lot. She gets
the potatoes by digging into the
hills with her hands and taking
a few with each hand.

08\13\{1898} (Saturday)
Sister Mary stayed to day with
her children. I worked at the Mattatuck
shop all day.
Peace was declared between the
United States of America and
the Government of Spain yesterday.
The President igned the
bill at 4 o'clock and has ordered
the blockade raised and most of
the troops ordered home.
No Connecticut troops have taken an active part
in this war. The first Reg. were
stationed for a time at Fort Knox
at Bucksport, Maine and some
of them were at Gull Island a
short time. They were ordered back
to Niantic and from thence to
Camp Alger in Mo. from thence
to New Port{??} News{??} where
they were about to embark on
board the transports for Cuba
last Thursday when the order
was countermanded and now
they are about to return home.
This evening I went to visit
George Edwards.

08\14\{1898}
Got up at 8 o'clock. Had breakfast
of baked beans after which I wrote
several letters and read some. Brother
Rolland Jenner came about midnight
and stayed with us. About noon
Sister Mary and her two children Louise
and Effel and Pierpont, Raymond, Clyde,
Irving {????????} and myself went
for a ride. Roll could not go as he had
to play his coronet at Boulder Grove with
the American Band. We went through
Prospect to the lower part of Cheshire
and down the mountain to the Cook
places, then up to Roaring Brook, where we
climbed up the gorge, the boys going to
the top of the mountain, but as Mary
got tired, we came back after going to
the foot of the falls. We drove home
over the old Cheshire road and had supper of
ham, potaotes, string beans, etc.
David B. Hamilton died this
morning after a long illness. He
was President of Rogers Brass Mfg.
Co. of this city and Rogers Brass of
Meriden.

08\15\{1898} (Monday)
To day my boy Raymond is three
years old. The children celebrated the
occasion by a little birthday party.
Went this evening to see Father about
getting a job of work at the Waterbury
Brass Co.

08\16\{1898} (Tuesday)
Worked at the Mattatuck shop to day.

08\17\{1898} (Wednesday)
Worked at the Mattatuck shop
till noon. Mr. Judd ordered
me to blue some buttons. Told
him that I must have .40 cts
an hour while I worked at that
work. But it being very hot,
I came home and intend to
blue the buttons in the morning.
This afternoon we had a severe
shower accompanined with much
thunder and lightning.
It hailed quite hard for about
10 minutes. The stones were as large
as walnuts, but it did little or no {damage}
as far as I could learn.
Miss Alice Pickett came out to go whortleberrying
out to Austin B. Pierpont's
and they sent Irving over to the lot
after the horse. After he had caught him,
he led him up to a rock to get on
his back when he began to strike
with his fore feet and dance up and
down and finally broke and ran
across the lot and lay down and
rolled over and over. Irving was
so surprised that he stood still and
looked till he felt several stings.
When he ran, the horse had stepped
on a yellow jacket nest and
stirred them up.

08\18\{1898} (Thursday)
Worked at the Mattatuck shop to
day. Went to the Grange this
evening. The lightning struck Joe
Laurence's house yesterday and did
a great deal of damage. The bolt passed
within a short distance of Mrs. Laurence's
head as she stood holding clothes but did not hurt her.

08\19\{1898} (Friday)
Arose this morning at 6.30. Had
breakfast of boiled round clams
and then Clyde and I went to
painting the house. We would
paint a spell and then wait for
it to rain and then paint again
and worked this way till about 3
o'clock when it cleared up so we got
in something more than half time{??}.
In the afternoon, Hattie Edwards
came to visit the girls and intends
to stay several days.
Major Tucker called this afternoon
to show me some buttons he had
been experimenting with to remove
the color.
The troops are arriving at their new
camp an Manataunk Point from
Santiago de Cuba on the 15inst{??}
Roosevelts Rough Riders{????} landed.
This Regiment was raised in Arizona,
New Mexico, Indian Territory and
Oklahoma, and have seen more
service than any other troops.
The President ordered yesterday
the mustering{??} out of service
from 75,000 to 100,000 volunteers.

08\20\{1898} (Saturday)
Got up this morning at half past
five and went to painting on my
house. Mary and the children got
ready and went to the Sunday
School picnic at Mr. Garrigus',
started at eleven o'clock.
Bertha and Clara French called
after they had gone to have their
bicycle tire "blown up". So I filled
them with wind. Then I got
ready and went to Mr. Tucker's
and we drove to Thomas Fairclough's
in Wolcott thence to Wolcott Center
then up Pudding Street to Charles
Minar's then over to Plumb Street
and over Pike Hill and stopped at
the old burying ground. Then
we went to the Wird{??} Burying
Ground where we met one Mr.
Henry Pond of Bristol who told
me that his wife was sister to
Mr. Luman Lewis of Southington
and that his son and my mother were
second cousins. He, Mr. Pond, is 84 years
old and she 82 years. Came home through
Woodtick and found the folks home
from the picnic. They had had a nice
time.

08\21\{1898} (Sunday)
Mr. Howell preached this afternoon
at Mill Plain Chapel. There was
a large attendence. My wife and
I walked across the lots with Mr.
and Mrs. Able and Agnes, Olive
and the children. Heard that Mr.
Joseph Rodier was very sick. Someone
killed a rattlesnake on the Meriden Road
near the South Schoolhouse in Wolcott.
Joseph Huey was discharged from
the Mattatuck shop yesterday, they
not having business enough to keep
him.

08\22\{1898} (Monday)
Margin note: We paddled in a brook that
had big flat stones

After breakfast this morning, Mary, Clyde
Irving, Margaret, Ruth, Pierpont, Raymond,
Hattie Edwards and myself took old Jack
and the business wagon, (except Clyde
and Irving who went on their wheels)
and drove to Pike Hill in the North
Eastern part of Wolcott, whortleberrying{?}
where we picked about 8 quarts
of berries. There is an ancient burying
ground on this hill where we picked
the berries, several stones of which are
standing. They mark the graves of
Blakeslees, Bracketts, Meax{?} and others.
Mr. Henry A. Pond of Bristol told me
that his grandfather and grandmother
were buried here. I counted 24 graves
on a former visit when the leaves
were off the trees and bushes. It has
ever since my remembrance ben
grown up in common woods. On
one of the stones is the following
inscription, Mrs. Rachel Brackett,
who died Oct. 12th 1776 in the 22nd
year of her age.
When you are blooming young and spry,
Perhaps you think you nere shall die,
But here' s a witness of the truth,
That you may die when in your youth.
I hope that sometime I shall be one
of the number to clean up and restore
that sacred ground.
From Pike Hill we went East down
the hill to the Wird{??} Burying Ground
then South about a quarter of a mile
to a lot on the East side of the road
where we found a fine spring of water
and where we picked 12 quarts of blackberries,
after which we we drove over
Pike's Hill again then North to
the Cedar Swamp Road which we
took, and went down past the old
schoolhouse (still in use) and across
the dam and over the North end
of Spindle Hill to home where we
arrived at 8 o'clock.
After we had been home a short time,
sister Cara came with Miss Amelia
Burnhart in Mr. Edward Todd's carriage
and said that she had broken Father's
carriage out{?} to Mr. Todd's and wished
we would go out with her and get it.
I told her I would go.
Just then Irving told me that Mrs.
Gallivan who lives in the next house
was in the front yard drunk and was
going to stay all night. I went and
managed to get her home by holding
her from falling and found her husband
and left them jawing{?}.
When I came back I found Mr. Fred
Woods with a bill of an old account
that shows according to his figures
that I owe him over $100.00 dollars.
After eating a few mouthfuls, Cara
and I drove to Mr. Todd's and Southington
Mountain and I found that two
of the carriage axles were sprung and
set them back and we drove home,
it being very dark and hot.

08\23\{1898} (Tuesday)
Worked about home all day, saw Mr.
Sidney Bronson and he wants me to
build an ice house for him.
Bought a barrell of flower {flour} of Mr. Thomas
Kelly (Baker) to day for $5.25.

08\24\{1898} (Wednesday)
Welded a set of steel tires for John
French this forenoon and cleaned out
the chicken coop and privy. Painted
on the house till 4 o'clock when Clyde,
Pierpont and myself got ready and
drove to town, went first to the
Mattatuck shop where I got what
was due me, $7.00 but Mr. Judd had
my pay made out 5.00. After some
argument he admitted that I had
worked three and one half days
and there was due me $7.00
Then I went to Mr. Davenport's
to see about getting someone to
preach at the Chapel next Sunday.
He expects to be in Northfield
and all of the Congregational
ministers are having their vacation.
He told me of a Mr. Hendsey at
No. 53 Spenser Avenue that I
might get. I went thither but
found that he was away on
his vavcation too. I then went
to see Mr. Haldenat{??}, his store
on North Main Street, but it
threatened rain so I started over
long hill as fast as we could
drive to Morris Alcott's where
I saw his father and asked him if
he would ask Morris if he would get
the Waterville minister. Then we
started for home. It was thundering
and lightning North and
West of us and when we reached
the Schoolhouse, it began lightning
south of us. The rain was
coming from all directions
except East and there was no
escaping getting wet, and we
sped fast as possible and {???}
the rain at the Grange Hall.
We got soaked before we reached home.
The thunder was terrific and the
lightning sharp.

08\25\{1898} (Thursday)
Worked this forenoon about home.
Mr. Sidney P. Bronson called and
wanted me to go to his farm in East
Farms and build an ice house.
I went there to work at noon and
worked till six o'clock.

08\26\{1898} (Friday)
Worked at Sid Bronson's all day.
A party of young men came to
night to have me learn them to drum.

08\27\{1898} (Saturday)
Worked to day for Sid Bronson.
He paid me amount due, 5.00.

08\28\{1898} (Sunday)
Staid about home all day except in
the eveningc went to see Father.
Mr. Rafter{??} preached at the Chapel.

08\29\{1898} (Monday)
To day I worked at S. P. Bronson's on
his ice house.

08\30\{1898} (Tuesday)
Worked on S.P. Bronson's ice house
till noon, and then went to work in
his silo packing corn. He had 16 men
and 5 double teams getting in the
corn. Clyde and Mort Pierpont went
to New Haven to day on their wheels.

08\31\{1898} (Wednesday)
Worked to day at S.P. Bronson's getting
in the silo corn. He had 20 men and
7 double teams.

09\01\{1898} (Thursday)
Worked at S.P. Bronson's packing his
silo corn in his ice house.
Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening. Joseph Rodier died this
afternoon of a cancer in the rectum.

09\02\{1898} (Friday)
Arose this morning at 5.30. Went to
Sid Bronson's and finished putting
the roof on the silo, got through at
half past eleven. Then went to
A. B. Pierpont's and got a scythe
and snath{????}. Came home and had dinner
at noon, after which Clyde and I painted
on the house till night. In the evening
Charlie Hotchkiss, George Cass, Burt
Haskins, Arthur Pierpont, Mort Pierpont,
Howard Neil, Burt Pierpont, Clarence
Warden, Art Warden and Irving
came to learn to drum and Clyde
and Robert Hotchkiss and Charlie
Cass were practicing fifing.
The drummers were in the new
carriage house and the fifers were
in my room, Charlie Cass sitting
where I am now. While we were
practicing, a thunder shower came
up and the lightning struck
the chimney and scattered the bricks
about the yard and street. One bolt
went down the Southeast valley{??}
and followed the corner{?} past down
to the veranda roof, stripping
off the plaster on the inside
and the clappards{?} on the out.
Another ran down the NE corner

{Margin note: Ruth and I were upstairs in " new building " - M. H.}

conductor pipe tearing off some of
the cornace{??} on its way and made
a hole in the ground about the size
of a waterpail, another followed two
rafters from the chimney to the eve{?}
trough and then along the conductor
pipe to the ground at the N. W. corner.
This bolt tore up splinters on the
floor where I am no sitting in
front of my desk. Charlie Cass
was sitting here at the time, and
Clyde was sitting at his left and
Rob Hotchkiss at his right.
I doubled Charlie Cass up like a jackknife
and shacked{?} all three. There were two
distinct marks on Clyde's left
leg like {????} + +, one above the
other and both above the knees. We
thought that the house was on
fire and the drummers rushed
in and we found the garret
full of smoke but there was no
fire. Mary at the time was
in the front chamber upstairs.
Joe Huey was sitting at the
table in the sitting room, holding Raymond
in his lap. Pierpont was in bed in his
room in the N. E. chamber. Charlie
Cass, Rob Hotchkiss and Clyde were
in the N. E. room down stairs. It seems
a miracle that none were hurt
more than they were.
Irving had just taken the cushion and
blankets out of the bugger{??} by the chicken
coop and he was knocked down
flat, when we were coming to the house.
Charlie Hotchkiss picked up a brick
and it burned the inside of his hand.

09\03\{1898} (Saturday)
After breakfast this morning we cleaned
up about the house and got ready to
repair the chimney which was knocked
all to pieces by the lightning last
night at a little before 9 o'clock.
Then wrote a letter to Fred in Detroit
about his furniture. Then went to
see Mr. Jones the insurance agent
who insured my house in the Oriental
Co. of Hartford about getting the
insurance and pyut in a claim of fifty
dollars which he said he would report
at the companie's headquarters and told
me to call next Tuesday or Wednesday, told
me to repair the chimney but to leave the
rest till after it is settled.
Came home and ate dinner of boiled
beans and then went to work at the
chimney and worked the rest of the
afternoon. The Mattatuck shop did not
run to day.
Mr. Sidney P. Bronson paid me this
afternoon for the labor I had done him
to date, $8.00.

09\04\{1898} (Sunday)
This day has been one of the hottest
ever known. The thermometer stood
100 degrees in the shade and 128 in the
sun. I stayed home most of the day
till 3 o'clock when we went to the Chapel
and heard the Rev. Mr. Perry preach.
There were but few people there owing
to the heat. In the evening went to see
Mr. Tucker, came home and to bed at 11.30.

09\05\{1898} (Monday)
To day is Labor Day and is a legal holiday.
The young people of the vicinity wanted
me to take them to the Memeriden Mountain.
There were about 50 people and Arthur
Pierpont's bus and 8 other teams carried
them besided several of the boys who
went on their bicycles.
We started at 9 o'clock from the corner of
the Meriden Road above Austin Pierpont's
and arrived at the mountain at about
4.30 o'clock. Had a picnic, setting the
tings out on the ground, and the
people sitting on horse blankets, cushions.
After all had eaten, we climbed to the top of
West Peak but the atmosphere was heavy and
we could not see the sound nor the
capitol at Hartford, but the view from
there was grand. I found the spring on
the West side of the mountain of which
I had heard. It is in a cave on the West
side of the mountain about 1/8 of a
mile North of the West peak and to
reach it one must climb down a
steep ravine. We started for home
about 4 o'clock and went first
to Meriden then turned North
this side of the crossing of the
West Main Street by the Meriden,
Waterbury and Connecticut River
Rail Road (not in use) and went
up through Cat* Hole Pass to

{Margin notes: }
1) Mr. Warden was sick - M. Hall
2)We children went to sleep on the floor of the "bus" (Arthur Pierpont's
peach wagon)
3) * Is the "Cat" still there? It was a rock formation high above the road that
looked like a big {???} cat ready to pounce on us.

Southington. Through this pass
we saw some of the most interesting
work of nature that I
ever saw. The pass is only wide
ebough for the road in some
places and mountains tower on
each side, while farther on the country
becomes open, but is enclosed
by mountains on all sides.
In going to Southington, we got lost
and came out at Mill Dale and
got home at about 11.00 o'clock, that is
some of us did. Mr. Byan's team,
Chas Casses' team and Mr. Warden's
team turned back in Meriden and
they got home sooner.

09\06\{1898} (Tuesday)
Worked about home all day.

09\07\{1898} (Wednesday)
Worked about home all day.

09\08\{1898} (Thursday)
Went to day to Platt's Mills to
see Mr. Osbourn{?} about the lay{law??}
that provides for the education
of scholars in towns where there is
no high school. Saw Mr. Ben Bristol.
He seemed rather anxious that
I should help them out about
steel buttons.
Mr. Jones and William Chatfield
called to see about the amount
of damage the lightning done to
my house.

09\09\{1898} (Friday)
Worked for Wilson L. Pierpont
in his Springfield lot in Mill
Plain this forenoon, and at his
farm in East Farms this afternoon
cutting corn.

09\10\1898 (Saturday)
Worked all day to day up in
Wilson pierpont's Springfield meadow
cutting and loading fodder corn.
Found two Indian arrow points
there.

09\11\1898 (Sunday)
Got up at 7 o'clock, wrote letters to
F. A. Hulls Co., Danbury, L L
Enswort{?} & Son, Hartford, and
Fred D. Miller, Detroit, Mich.
Had breakfast of boiled beel{??}
after which I cleaned the backyard.
Rolland Jenner came and tole
me of a Mr. Buckmaster{??} who could
pack Fred's furniture which he
wants me to send to him.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon
and heard Mr. Buckley preach
a sermon on the last war.
In the evening went to see Mr. Tucker.
He told me that in hardening steel
butttons, they wanted to be left in
the furnace at a cherry{?} heat from 14
to 16 hours.

09\12\{1898} (Monday)
The weather wasvery cold this morning.
After a breakfast of boiled eggs, I went to
W. L. Pierpont's and tended silo cutter all day.
Went to town this evening to see Mr.
Buckmaster but did not see him as his
house was all dark when I got there.

09\13\{1898} (Tuesday)
Went to Wilson Pierpont's and tended
cutter for cutting up silo corn.
Clyde is fourteen years old to day.

09\14\{1898} (Wednesday)
after a breakfast of fried ham and eggs, I
went to W. L. Pierpont's and worked cutting
corn till eleven o'clock. Came home
and had dinner of succotash after which
I went to see Mr. Buckmaster and found
that he is coming to llok at Fred's
furniture tomorrow. Then went to
see Mr. Jones but he was not in.
Then to the Town Clerk's office to
look up the records, then to Platts
Mills to see Mr. Benjamin Bristol
about making steel buttons for
the Platt Brass. Got home at 6 o'clock
and went to bed at 8 o'clock.

09\15\1898 (Thursday)
After a hurried breakfast I went to
Arthur Pierpont's to help him fill his
silo this morning. His two silos hold
120 tons of corn. Staid there all day.
In the evening went to Grange Hall
to Miss Girtrude Bradley's entertainment,
she being {?????} of the
Grange. The flowers were fine and
were furnished mostly by Maj.
Tucker. There was a little fruit, the
entertainment program was very
good. One James Martain of
the City to day jumped from the
high bridge that crosses the
Meriden Waterbury and Conn.
River R.R. at the point where the
Od Prospect Road crossed it, near
Henry Wedge's, with intent to
commit suicide. He broke one
leg but was not otherwise
injured. He told his wife with
whom he was riding that he
wanted to get out and walk a little
ways and then jumped.

09\16\{1898} (Friday)
Was at Arthur Pierpont's all day filling
his silo. Roll Jenner was brought
home to day sick.

09\17\{1898} (Saturday)
Worked lining up an old silo, the
first ever made in this section
built in 1893 for A. B. Pierpont.
Mr. Buckmaster and two assistants
came and packed some of Fred's goods.

09\18\{1898} (Sunday)
Staid home all day.

09\19\{1898} (Monday)
Went to Arthur Pierpont's and helped
him fill his silo.

09\20\{1898} (Tuesday)
Was at Arthur Pierpont's all day.

09\21\{1898} (Wednesday)
Went to the Nangatuck Rail Road
depot and found that the "star union
line" was the best freight route to
ship Fred's furniture to Detroit
and that it would cast .59 cts per
hundred lbs, then went and
saw Mr. John Jones about
the insurance on my house. We
agreed that the damage caused
by lightning could be settled
and repaired for thirty dollars.
He is going to have Wm. Chatfield
do the plastering and give him
ten dollars and pay me twenty
dollars cash. Then went to
see Mr. Lewis Platt about
making steel buttons but found
that he was out of town, from
Platt's office on Brown St., I went
to the barber shop over Lake and
Strobell's Jewelry Store meeting
on the way sister Iva and told
her to wait a little while and I
would bring her home, after having
my hair cut for which I paid 20 cts.
I went to the butter store on South
Main St. and bou 1 lb. of butter
for which I paid 20 cts. then got
my team and came home.
Found Arthur Pierpont in front of
my house on his team wagon and made
an agreement to have him carry
Fred's furniture to the depot.
He paid me $10.00 for the 5 days
work I did for him.
Had dinner after which I went
to Mr. Tucker's and worked 3 1/2 hours
banking{??} celery.
{Note: I remember him doing it. - M.H.}

09\22\1898 (Thursday)
This morning I repaired the roof to the
old shed to some extent. About 16 o'clock
Arthur Pierpont's team came and we loaded
brother Fred's furniture on to the
wagon and I took the remainder on
my one horse wagon and we took
it to the Nangatuck Rail Road depot.
It weighed 3080 lbs and cost $18.17
to send it. I paid Arthur Pierpont
$4.00 for carrying the furniture to
the depot, after unloading and
settling for the furniture, I went
to Mr. Buckmaster's upholstering
shop on Abbott Avenue to get his
bill for packing the furniture but
he was not in, after which I drove
through Spenser Ave. to Kingsbury
St. to North Elm to Maple Ave.
to Cherry to Camp then across
High Rock to Walnut St. then over
Long Hill on the summit of
which I met William Todd and he
told me that last night the
Republican's nominated Charlie Horn
of Linden Street for first selectman
and Mr. Schmidt second. Came home
via the Stetson Road.
I in the evening went to the Grange
with Mary. Today is Mary's
birthday, she is 38 years old. To me
she seems as young as she did
when I married her when she was 23
although we have now a family of
six children.

09\23\{1898} (Friday)
Staid about home all day, repaired
the roof on the old shed.

09\24\{1898} (Saturday)
Clyde and I mowed the swamp
back of Mrs. Larman Johnson's
house. We got very wet and chilled
with the rain. In the afternoon,
I went to see Gilbert Hotchkiss
about selling my shop but he
was not at home, from thence
went to Miles Payne's and got
my horse shod, came home,
and Irving went to Hemingway's
fish market and got the oysters
for tomorrow's breakfast.
This afternoon I received Mr.
Buckmaster's bill for packing
Fred's furniture. It amounted
to $27.28. Wrote him a letter and
mailed it to him.

09\25\{1898} (Sunday)
Staid about home most of the
day. Went to the Chapel. Mr.
Waters preached.

09\26\{1898} (Monday)
Ran the washing machine for Mary this
morning, then went to Johnson's swamp
and tedded{??} out my hay, came home and
made a hay rigging. Then went out and raked
the hay up and carted it home which took
the rest of the day.

09\27\{1898} (Tuesday)
This day is the fortieth anniversary
of my birth, having as my mother
told me been born on Sept 27th, 1858.
My son Pierpont, 5 yrs., and I drove today from
home to Cousin Malachi Gillette's in
North Goshen.
We left home at about 8 o'clock and
drove to town, where I bought a pair of
pants for Pierpont at Jones & Morgan's
Clothing Store for which I paid 48 cts,
took the old pants to Miss Pickett's
and left them and the change from
a $10.00 bill except $2.00 which I kept. We
left Waterbury Center at 9.15 and
drove to Watertown, a distance of 6
miles, from thence to Bethlehem,
6 miles, thence to Romford station on the
Shepanhg River 8 miles, then to Woodville
3 miles, thence through a rough country
near a little river to Milton 6 miles,
then to West Goshen over a rough road
but through a very interesting country,
a distance of 4 1/2 miles, then over a
fine road to Goshen Center 1 1/2 miles,
where I stopped and put the horse under
the Congregational Church sheds
and went to a Harness Shop and
enquired for Mr. and Mrs. Martain
where Agnes Able was visiting as
I supposed. We called there but she
was not there and was not coming
till next Sunday Mrs. Martain
said. We then went to the Post
Office and I mailed a letter to brother
Fred in Detroit. We left for North
Goshen at 6 o'clock via North Street and
the road that runs over Ivy Mountain
and came out at Luddington's
Corner on East Street and then to
cousin Malachi's, the road through
would have been dark and dangerous,
had it not been for the bright moon.
We found them all well and gald to
see us. Cousin Lillie got supper for
us. The distance from Goshen to North
Goshen was 5 miles, and the distance
from home to Waterbury Center 2
miles makes a distance of forty-two
miles that we traveled.

09\28\{1898} (Wednesday)
This forenoon at about 11 o'clock, Cousin
Malachi and I after eating a lunch
drove over to Obed Stannard's in
South Norfolk, who is a first cousin
to my father. We got there a little
after twelve as they were preparing
dinner. We sat down and dined with
them, after which we visited a while.
They have a fine farm, keep about 25
cows, everything seems to be up
in good repair and thrifty{?}. The family
consists of himself and wife, a son
whom I did not see, and a daughter
Blanche aged 17. The house is situated on a
hill where a fine view of parts of Goshen
and Ivy Mountain and the Tower may
be seen in the West and S.W. To the
S.E. Winchester Center is in full view
and a tower for observation van be
seen on Platt Hill beyond.
From Obed Stannard's we drove to
Horrace [Horace?] Stannard's at Norfolk Center
stopping on the way at a little cemetery
on the right hand side of the road
where many of the Stanards are
buried. Mr. Horace Stannard has
a fine place a little East of Norfolk
and his business is keeping teams
and carrying the New York boarders
around sightseeing for which
they pay well. He had to go away
and we only saw him a few minutes.
His wife seemed like a very nice
woman, after a short stay we
went to a grist on the West Side
of the town and got a bag of meal
and then drove home to Malachi
Gillette's.

09\29\1898 (Thursday)
To day Cousin Mal went to work
for Owen Hallock getting out manure.
Mr. Hallock owns over 1200 acres of
land and 150 head of cattle.
Pierpont and I took Old Jack, the horse
and drove to Ivy Mountain, by
way of the "black land". We went up the
tower where we had a grand view
of the country for miles around
could see the Catskill Mountains
on the West and way up in Mass. on
the North and great distances in other
directions, but the atmosphere was a
little hazy otherwise we could see more.
From the mountain we went N.W.
through the Ovaitt [Oviatt] District to Cornwall
Hollow, passing a house on the way
near the school house in the Ovaitt [Oviatt]
District, with a bank wall in front, some
of the cap stones of which were over
30 feet in length I should judge.
At Cornwall Hollow I saw the General
Sedgewick Mansion and also the Cemetery
where he is buried. Mr. Samuel Gillette
of North Goshen told me the following history
of the Gen. Sedgewick place. The father of the
General when a Colonel in the Revolutionary
War was stationed at Dutch Bridge in
Massachusetts and while there the Tories
burned his house, which was a log one.
He brought his regiment to Cornwall
Hollow and built a large new house
where the old log house had stood.
With the great number of men and by
pressing all the sawmills in service
that were in that section, he completed
the new house with the exception
of a few miunor details in the
remarkably short time of three days.
He dug the cellar after the war was
over. Mr. Gillette and a friend were
passing over a mountain over looking
Cornwall Hollow in 1857 when they
chanced to see smoke issuing from
the garrett window of this Sedwick
House. They watched it a few minutes
and saw that the house was on fire.
They hastened there as soon as
possible and by the time they
arrive d there the whole thing had
got beyond control and burned
to the ground.
The General at the time was in the
West fighting the Indians and
soon he came home and built
the present mansion. Mr. Gillette
built the cellar and did all of the
stone work. It was there that his
remains were brought from the
fatal field of Spottsylvania Court House
after the Rebel sharpshooter's bullet had
doen its work. The incident of his death
was as follows, On Monday May 9th,
1865 as he was directing the placing
of some pieces of Artillery, some Rebel
sharp-shooters stationed in some trees
about a mile off were firing at them.
Some of the Staff officers were annoyed
and spoke words of caution to the
General his reply was "Poo, they couldn't
hit an elephant at that distance." He
had scarcely uttered the words when
he fell dead; pierced through the head with
a blullet. Brigadier John Sedgwick was
respected by all the Northern Nation; His
soldiers loved him and were ready to follow
"Uncle John" wherever he might lead.
(The above was told me by a veteran
who was with the General and witnessed
his death). The people from the
country for miles round turned out
to do honour to his name at the funeral
as well as many of the Nation's officials
both Civil and Military.
From Cornwall Hollow we went
to North Cornwall and thence to
Cornwall Center, thence over the mountains
north of West Goshen, around
West and North of Tyler Pond over some
finefarming country, then North up
past the West side of "West Side Pond"
where I got bewildered but I found
two school boys going home, who I took
into the wagon and they showed me
the way to Ivy Mountain, their
names were Howe{??}. I followed their
{??} and got to North Goshen at dark.

09\30\{1898} (Friday)
This is the last day of the month, how
fast time travels.
I stayed at Cousin Mall's this forenoon
and read the "Life of Gen Lafyette".
After dinner PIerpont and I went
to the North Pond and took a boat
and rowed to the North end and then
walked through some brush and
swamp to the "Tipping Rock". It is
a great boulder which I measured
and figured that it would weigh
32 tons, which sits on top of an
elevated bed rock or ledge, and by
pushing on the East or West side it
will rock back and forth, so well balanced
is it, that after it has been set
in motion, it will continue to rock
some time, it is about 9 ft high
and the top moved about six inches.
Cousin Marion did not go as she
expected as she intends to go home
with us tomorrow.

10\01\{1898} (Saturday)
This morning dawned clear and fine, we
have had nice weather now for two weeks.
We, Cousin Marion, Pierpont and I,
got ready and started for Waterbury a
little after seven o'clock, drove through
Goshen East Street to Litchfield, thence
through West Morris to Waertown, the
country through which we passed was pleasing
to the eye and everything was interesting.
From Watertown we came through
the center of Waterbury home where
we arrived about 2 o'clock. The weather
during the last part of the trip was
very hot and we ad to drive slow.
In the evening we went to town
and took Marion to see the fire horses
come from their stables and take their
places in the harness when the alarm
rings at 9 o'clock. She also went round
the center with Clyde and saw the
crowds of people which surprised
her, as she had never been in the
City before in the evening. After we
got home, I went to see Mr. Tucker but
could not wake him up, so came home
to bed at 11.45.

//new journal starts here; October 1898 - October 1899//
//[encoded by Mary LaRue, December 1989]
//{marginal and interlinear comments apparently by Margaret Miller
//Northrop Hall, at some point when reading journals}

10\02\1898 (Sunday)

After doing the chores and eating break-
fast. [[Ch]] Irving, Margaret, Ruth, and
myself went to St. Johns Church
to let Cousin Marion hear the boy
Choir, and see the Church.
We went to the Chapel in the after-
noon and heard Mr. Perry preach
an excellent sermon. The amount
collected at this service was $1.75.
In the evening Clyde, Mary,
Marion, and Myself went to
the Second Congregational church
and Mr. Davenport preached.
They had a large nice Choir.
After service we came to father's
and the girls played and we sang
for a long time, after which we
came home, and went to stay with
Mr. Tucker, but he had gone to bed
and I came home and went to bed at 11.30.

10\03\1898 (Monday)

Today is town election and I
went and voted for Charles Horne (?)
for first Select man, and the
straight Republican ticket right
through, also No Licence."
Went to Platt Bros and saw Mr.
L.A. Platt about making steel
buttons, He seemed very nice,
took my address and said that
he would send for me to come
and see them in a few days when
he was not so busy.
From there went to see Mr.
Jones about the insurance money
for damage done my house by
lightening. He was mad as he
had been twice to see Mrs. Munger
about signing the certificate {cirtificate} (which
was necessary as she holds the
mortgage {morgage} on the house) and
she would not, Came home and
went to Robert Warden's at
East farms, and dug potatoes
all the afternoon;
Cousin Marion Gillette went home
to North Goshen this afternoon
left on the train that leaves here at
3.58. In the evening went to
see Mr Wallace Camp in answer
to a letter to call and see about the
insurance, Found that he is Mrs
Mungers advisor, and a man
that is more particular than
he is wise, we went to see Mrs
Munger, she says that she does
not know much about insurance
and leaves it with Mr Camp,
He pretends to know all about it
and more too, But it was left
that I see Mr Jones and try to do
something I do not know what,

10\04\1898 (Tuesday)

Worked at Robert Wardens all
day digging potatoes, finished
late to night, he paid me 2.50
for what I had done

10\05\1898 (Wednesday)

It has rained most of the time to
day, spent the forenoon in writing up
this journal and in reading,
Mr Barmer was buried from the
Chapel this afternoon,
This afternnon I went to see Mr Jones
about the insurance money, Mrs Munger
was there yesterday, and said that
she would sign the cirtificates if I
would bring them to her, I carried
them to her and she signed them
as I did after which I brought them
to Mr Jones and he drew a check in
my favor for twenty dollars and
kept ten dollars to give to Wm
Chatfield to pay him for plaster-
ing. I took the check of $20.00 to
Mrs Munger and she gave me a
receipt, I then went to Weaters
store on East Main Street and bought
18 lbs of sugar for one dollar, then came
home.
Mr Nelson Hall was found dead in his
bed this morning.

10\06{written over 5}\1898 (Thursday)

Worked all day digging potatoes in
the Sherman Bronson lot, dug 14 1/2 bu
Went to the Grange with Mary
this evening, Learned that Mr
Nelson Hall is to be buried
from the Chapel next sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.

10\07{written over 6}\1898 (Friday)

Dug 22 1/2 bushels of potatoes to-
day, The drum Corps boys came
this evening and practiced.
Mr. Tucker sent a note by Mrs
Marrow to have me come and see
him after I got throught with the
Drummers. Ed Holden got
through working at the Mattatu-
ck shop yesterday.
Willdon Bros
No 31 Auburn St
Boston Mass
Dealers in button steel, so
Tucker told me

10\08\1898 (Saturday)

We built a shed this forenoon,
to keep the horse sled in and wheel
barrows in. This afternoon about
5 o'clock, I went to town and paid
Mr Buckmaster a Post Office Order
of $27.28 which brother Fred sent me
from Detroit, to pay for packing his
furniture.

10\09\1898 (Sunday)

We, that is Sister Mary Jenner,
and her two children, Pierpont, and
myself, in my two seated wagon
Father and Mother, in their carriage
and Rolland Jenner with his
Bycicle went to the top of the Meriden
mountain, where we had a fine view
of a great portion of the state, including
a little of long island sound.
Mr Nelson Hall was buried from
the Chapel this afternoon. Mr Maya
officiated, The Grange service was also
used.

10\10\1898 (Monday)

Worked at Mr Tuckers from 9 oclock
till six banking Celery.

10\11\1898 (Tuesday)

Was at Mr Tuckers from 6 till 12 work-
ing in the garden, This afternnon we
went to the Wolcott Fair Ground
to arrange the Grance exibit for the
Fair tomorrow, but there was not
enough to arrange, so we came home
and I went to Platts Mills, to see
if I could get a job.

10\12\1898 (Wednesday)

Went up to Mr Tuckers this mor-
ning, and he took me to the Wolcott
Fair ground where he was to arran-
ge the Grange exibit, we found
Clyde there he had walked and
got there ahead of us, there was but
a few pumpkins, and squashes and
some other vegitibles there and Mr
Tucker thought that there was not
enough to pay to bother with so
as it was raining, we started home,
and went to Waterbury center by
way of Lakewood, as we were coming
down North Main St we saw the
flag on City hall at half mast
and on enquiry found that Mr
Gurnesey Parsons, the Banker,
and he who had also been Mayor
of the City was dead,
Then we came home, and I went
to digging potatoes and dug and
put into the cellar 5 bushels.
this makes a total of 42 bushels
I have now in the Cellar.
When the Boys got home from the
Wolcott Fair they said that it was the
largest Fair that they have ever held.

10\13\1898 (Thursday)

Worked for Mr Tucker all day,
Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening

10\14\1898 (Friday)

Worked for Mr Tucker from 8 o clock.
It commenced to rain as I was
coming home, from work, We have
had fine weather till now.

10\15\1898 (Saturday)

Today the weather has been variable.
Cool, windy, rainy, and fair,
Agness Cohle came, at about quarter
to six to see if we were going to
Roaringbrook in Cheshire we were
not up when she came, but got up
as soon as possible, and told
her, that we would go. We then
got ready, and sent Pierpont and
Raymond to Mothers to stay, and
Clyde, Irving, Charlie Hotchkiss
and I went to Mother Pierponts
and cut firewood, till Mary
came with my team and then
we went to the East Farms School
house where we were to meet at
10 o'clock. In due time all of the
teams arrived except George Cass
and we started at the appointed
time in the following order. First
Arthur Pierpont with his vegtable
wagon and a pair of horses, he had
with him Mrs Levelette Upson,(2)
Miss Bessie Garrigus (3), Mr Lewis
Garrigus (4) Annie and Minnie Garrigus (6)
(twins) and Jessie Garrigus (7), and Willie
Garrigus (8), Jessie Monroe (9) Flora (10) and
Lewis Hitchcock (11), Charlie Hotchkiss (12),
Mort (13) and Fred Pierpont (14), Edith
Pierpont (15) Clyde (16) and Irving [[Pierpont]]
Miller (17), Arthur Warden (18), Flossy
Upson (19), and Henry Cass (20). Next
came my team with Ruth, Margaret,
my Wife and Myself, next Mr Mun-
sons team with Mrs Thedore Munson,
Agness Able, and Earl Munson, and
George Cass met us there with Miss
Ida Spender, We went there by way
of the Plank Road to Gilletts Corner
then by Matherns Street to Rag. Hallay
Road to Lights Pond then down
the mountain to Cooks Corner
on the New Haven Road and then
to the Brook and Gorge, After
eating our refreshments at the
foot of the Gorge we started for
the summit which was over 400
feet above us, Many of the ladies
were struck with the beauty of
the gorge, especially the 60 ft falls,
the Eave trough, and deep pool.
At the top of the Mountain we had
a fine view of a portion of the
sound, and East Rock with
the Souldiers Monument on
it, Meriden, Wallingford,
Cheshire etc. We started home
{marginal note: I remember about the watch--
different handwriting}
at about 4 o'clock, where we arrived
after dark, All having a good
time, but Mort Pierpont lost
a fine silver watch which his
Father gave him for Christmas,
Coming home, we, Clyde, Chas
Hotchkiss and myself, agreed
to start at three o'clock in the
morning and go over the ground
where Mort had been and see if
we could find it, After I had
eaten my supper and done my
chores Mrs Marrow called and
told me that Mr Tucker was
very sick, and wanted me to come
up immediately, I went and found
him in bed with his clothes on.
He had been taken with a dullness
and dizzyness at about 6 o'clock
and fell at the foot of the stairs,
They got him up in bed, and
called Dr Ward, his pults were
42 and and he appeared very
sick, I was to give medicine every
15 minutes, got his clothes off and
put him in bed with a water bottle at
his feet and plenty of bed clothes on
and warmed him up, and at eleven
o'clock he was much better and went
to sleep, I lay on the back side of
the bed, but did not wake him to
give medicine, and at 1.30 I fell a sleep

{margin: 10\16\1898 (Sunday)}

but awoke at three, he seemed much
better, and said that he would be
all right if I wanted to go away.
So I started home as fast as I could
had a lantern to see the way across
the lots, got Clyde up, and hitched
up the horse as soon as I could and
we went to Charlie Hotchkisses
and Clyde drummed on the
front door, and I on the back,
till we finally awoke him up,
then we started and reached the
top of the mountain at day break.
we looked the ground over with
great care but did not find the
watch, we then explored a dry
gorge, North of Roaring brook.
We followed the brook up to
the old mill, and saw some trout
10 inches long, We then went to
the top of the mountain and
followed it South to the road, we
then got the team and went
south through the Woods to
the South mountain road but
had difficulty in getting through
and had almost reached the
road when, in trying to cross
a little bog hole the horse went
in almost out of sight and we
had a great time getting him
unhitched and out, the harness
was broke some but we tied it
up, and started home via Prospect
center, we reached home at three
and after getting cleaned up and
eating supper (we having eaten no
meal since supper last night) I went
to see Mr Tucker, found him very
blue but much better, I stayed with
him all night.
The Rev Mr Hanna of the First
Methodist Church preached at the
Chapel this afternoon.

10\17\1898 (Monday)

Helped Mary at the washing this
morning by running the washing
machine, After which I went to work
for Mr Tucker at banking celery
and moving hay in the barn got
there at 9 o'clock and got through
at 4 o'clock. Mr Fanias Hahn a
tool maker at Steel and Johnsons is
building a house on the Meriden
turnpike near the watering trough
this side of Amanda Griswolds
place.

10\18\1898 (Tuesday)

Worked from eight to four o'clock for
Hiram Able mowing in his swamps
Mafor Tucker paid me 3.00
Levelette Upson of the Meriden Road got kick-
ed by his horse, and it broke his nose, and knocked one eye out

10\19\1898 (Wednesday)

Rained hard all day.

10\20\1898 (Thursday)

Worked for Hiram Able 8 hours

10\21\1898 (Friday)

George Case called this morning
and wanted me to go to his house
and lay up a bank wall.
I then went and got my wagon up
to the swamp on the Dolittle place
where I have been working at hay
for Hiram Able, and took one front
wheel, to Miles Paynes on East
Mountain to have it repaired,
I then went to work for George Cass
and laid wall from 8 till 5 o'clock.
A Mrs Roase of Naugatuck
murdered by Mrs Mariana
Pompania last night. They were
both Italians and were fighting.

10\22\1898 (Saturday)

Rained all day. They boys and I
put a plank floor in the horse stable

10\23\1898 (Sunday)

Read and wrote, on a paper about the march
of Count De Rachambeaus army through
Connecticut, in 1781, till it was time to
go to the Chapel, the Rev Mr Davenport
preached a good sermon, as he always
does, but I cannot now recall a single
word of it.

10\24\1898 (Monday)

This morning went to Gilbert Hotchkiss
on East Mountain, to see him about
selling my shop to some friend of his.
Found outnothing as he had not heard
from his friend, Then went to Miles
Paynes, and got a wheel that he had
repaired for me, for which he charged
one dollar, He gave me a check on Holmes
& Parsons Bank for Nine dollars
and Seventy two cents, which amount
he owed me,
Then came home and had breakfast,
and went to Hiram Ables and opened
out his hay, then to George Casse's
at 9 o'clock and laid wall till noon
then with George Cass and Charlie Hotchkiss
after dinner and got Hiram Ables hay
into a stack, which took till four o'clock
then to George Cass and laid wall till
dark, a little after five o'clock.
Hiram Able called in the evening to
asertain how much I charged for getting
in his hay I told him $5.00

10\25\1898 (Tuesday)

This morning went to George Casse's
and laid wall, about 10 o'clock Wm
Purdy of Prospect came to see me
about doing some joiner work
up to the Pratt place on East Moun-
tain, Went up with him and found
that he had lately become posessor
of the farm and wanted new sills
put under the barn, and 15 ft
built on the South end. I told
him that I would start on it next
thursday morning, am to get
$2.50 per day.

10\26\1898 (Wednesday)

Worked repairing the harness
till ten o'clock, then hitched up
and went to town, it raining.
Stopped at the Mattatuck Mfg
Co on my way, Went first to
Holmes & Parsons bank, and got the
check that Miles Paynes gave me
cashed 9.72, then went to Tracy
Bros to see about trading some
hard wood lumber for some shealk-
ing, then to the Chas Flacker Co
and bought some elboes, and nipples
for 1/2 iron pipe to rep Mother
Pierponts watering trough with .25
thence to Jones & Morgans and
bought two pairs of overalls and
jumpers for which I paid 1.90. thence
to Miller & Pecks and bought
1 yd of elastic for .05 from thence
to D. L. Dickinson's and got a bag
of oats for 1.15 then home where I arrived
at 12.30 o'clock, worked about home in
the afternoon cleaning and repairing
my harness.

10\27\1898 (Thursday) [[Wednesday]]

Went to work today for William
Purdy at the Pratt place on East
Mountain, Worked 9 hours, chopping
down trees and drawing the logs
down to the barn for the sills etc.
Received a letter to day from Mr
D. G. Porter, asking me to return
a old mowing machine that I
borrowed of him in 18 but which
Miss Girtrude Bradley who acted
as his agent while he was in
Europe wished me to take for
pay for services I did in saving
the shade trees in front of Mr
Porters house from being cut
by the Waterbury Traction
Co, who were agitating extend-
ing their line past his house,
The trees are in the highway.
We recived news today that
Clarance Gaylord Davenport son of
the Rev Dr John G Davenport of the
Second Congregational Church in
this City, died of typhoid fever yesterday at Porto
Rico, near Panci, [[yesterday]]. He was
a member of Co.C. First United
States VOlunteer engineers.
He was 30 years old the 21st day of
last April, He joined the Second
church in 1884 {written over 3}, the same day that
my wife and I did.

10\28\1898 (Friday)

Yesterday and today the weather
has been clear and fine.
Worked hueing timber for
Wm Purdy nine hours, this
is the first hueing that I have
done in years.
{writing large--hands sore!}

10\29\1898 (Saturday)

Cloudy all day, hued nine
hours, Wm Purdy paid me
$6.75 for the last 3 days work.
Earnest Robinson had a daughter born
to day, their second child.

10\30\1898 (Sunday)

Stayed with Major Tucker last
night, Read in Barbers History
of Conn all the forenoon, and went
to the Chapel this afternoon,
Dr Anderson was to have preach-
ed, but Earnest Robinson who
went after him could not find
him, so Hiram Able lead the
meeting which was one of
praise and song, and was very
interesting.
In the evening Agness Able took
my horse and two seated wagon and
carried Mrs Bryan (who lives in
Watertown) to the City.

10\31\1898 (Monday)

Worked hueing timber for Wm
Purdy 9 hours to day

11\01\1898 (Tuesday)

Went to East Mountain and
hued timber for Wm Purdy
Mr Frank Thompkins moved
from the Pratt place on East Moun-
tain to the tenement over Spenser
Pierponts store on East Main St.
Milan Northrop called today to
get me to build a ice house for
him.

11\02\1898 (Wednesday)

Worked for Wm Purdy 9 hours to
day. Went to the Chapel this
evening to the first supper of
the season given by the ladies
Union, they made about $9.00
Wm Clark began working for Purdy

11\03\1898 (Thursday)

Worked for Wm Purdy 9 hours
Went to the Grange this evening

11\04\1898 (Friday)

This day I worked framing
timber for Wm Purdy.

11\05\1898 (Saturday)

Worked for Wm Purdy.
Todays paper said that they would
have trains running on the
Middletown Meriden and Water-
bury Rail Road by Thanksgiving
probably. the road has laid idle
for the two or three years.

11\06\1898 (Sunday) [[Oct]]

This morning was very rainy, had
breakfast at 8.30 o'clock of bacon and fried
oysters, after which I read the papers
awhile, when Morris Alcott came
to see if I would get a minister for
the Chapel next Sunday,
Then I put a lock and hinges on
an old tool chest that used to
belong to Grandfather Somers
which Uncle Joe gave me, and
which I intend to use,
Called on Hiram Able this even-
ing to see about letting him
take my horse to draw sand
with Tuesday.
Went to see Mr Tucker in the
evening, He returned from New
York last Friday afternoon,
While there he saw Mr ----- agent
for the Judd Co. who purchases the
nails made by the Mattatuck Co.
He says that the Mattatuck Co has
got to bust before long, and I hope
it will,
The Rev Mr Parry preached at the
Chapel this afternoon.

11\07\1898 (Monday) [[Oct]]

Worked for Wm Purdy 9 hours.
Went to Charles Cass this evening to
see if he would be Grandpa in
the entertainment to be given
at Grange Hall the evening
after Thanksgiving.
{margin: 2.25} "He Said he would."

11\08\1898 (Tuesday) [[Oct]]

This morning after breakfat
I went to the Armory and voted
for the candidates who were nom-
inated on the Republican tacket,
George E Lounsbury for Govern-
or, also voted for Lieutenant Governor,
Congressman, State Senetor, Representitaves
Justices of the Peace, County Sheriff etc,
Then went to work for Wm Purdy at
{margin: 1.75} the Pratt place. Worked from 9 to 5 o'clock
Went up to Mr Garrigus this evening.

11\09\1898 (Wednesday) [[Oct]]

Worked at Purdys this day 9 hours,
We learned that Lounsbury was
elected Governor of Connecticut at
yesterday election, Durant and
Brett were elected Representatives
over Cowell and O'Niel, Warren
Hall was defeated, and Kennedy
of Naugatuck was elected State
{2.25} Senetor, It snowed a little this
forenoon, the first of the season.

11\10\1898 (Thursday)

This morning it looked like rain
and I did not go to work.
I hitched into the big wagon and went
down to my shop and drew up
three loads of wood when it rained
so hard that I had to stop, after getting
wet through, spent the rest of the
day in putting things to rights
{00} about home.

11\11\1898 (Friday)

It has been very cold and windy
today. Worked for William Purdy
9 hours. Charlie Hotchkiss and George
{2.25} Cass, with Irving and myself practiced
drumming this evening.

11\12\1898 (Saturday)

The weather has been fine today.
Worked for Wm Purdy nine hours;
He paid me $13.50 which paid me
{2.25} up to last Saturday night the 5th.
Charlie Hotchkiss and George Cass
{10.75} came this evening and we worked
repairing drums.

11\13\1898 (Sunday)

Did not sleep much last night owing
to a hard cold, and to Pierpont who
had the croup, after a breakfast
of stewed oysters, I set a number
of window glass and did other odd
jobs, in the afternoon went to the Chapel
and heard the Rev Joseph Anderson preach
a notice of a meeting of the Ladies Union
was read, to be held next Wednesday
afternoon from 1.30 to 5 o'clock for work,
supper is to be omitted.
After supper went to see Mr Tucker,
staid till nine o'clock and came home
in the rain. The weather had been
fine up to this time.

11\14\1898 (Monday)

This morning at about 5 o'clock
Margaret told us to look out
of the West windows and see the
fire, the sky in the direction of
the City beyond Abrigador
hill was all aglow and at times
a blaze could be seen leaping up.
It proved to be the barn of Mr Hot-
chkiss on West Side hill.
I worked for Mr Purdy 9 hours today.

11\15\1898 (Tuesday)

Worked on East Mountain for Mr Purdy
today putting up the fraim for the
{2.25} new barn addittion and began cover-
ing it, was there from 7 to 5.
This morning Marice Reid awoke
and thought that it was daylight
on looking at the clock he saw that
it was two o'clock, and on looking
out the door saw that his barn was
on fire, it burned to the ground,
and two horses and two young
cattle were also burned, the cause
of the fire was unknown.
Clarance Davenport, son of
Rev John Davenport, of the Second
Congregational Church, was buried
this afternoon, with military
honors, the body arived from
Portorico where he died of the
typhoid fever, last friday.
Rev Joseph Anderson ^of this City and Rev Mr
Foster of Boston preached the funeral
sermons, in the Second Congregation-
al Church, which was filled to over-
flowing. Clarance was a member of
the 1st U.S. Regt, of engineers, and
is the second souldier who went
from Waterbury and died in this
war with Spain.

11\16\1898 (Wednesday)

Worked on East Mountain for Wm
Purdy 9 hours putting on covering.
The Grange Fair opened tonight
{2.25} the attendence was rather small consider-
ing the number of tickets sold.

11\17\1898 (Thursday)

Arose this morning at 5.30 o'clock,
fed the horse 2 quarts of cracked corn
and 2 of oats and a forkful of hay.
Ate breakfast of Codfish balls after
which I did odd jobs till 9 o'clock (it
raining quite hard,) when I got
ready and started for town
stoped at my shop and shut down a
window which the boys left open last
saturday when they took the stoves out,
carried the milk to Fathers, and stoped
there a while, then went to take the
trolley car at Silver Street, road
to the center, for which Mr Tucker
paid 5 cts. We got on at Silver street
and paid both of our fares,
First I went to George Minors
Shoe Store and bought a pair of
articks for which I paid $1.50 thence
to Miller & Pecks dry good store
and bought one skein of carpet
thread for .05 cts, thence 5to Mr
Roberts the truss maker and had
him repair my truss so it
would hold my rputure better,
which took till noon, Paid 1.50, thence to
Hotchkiss and Templetons hard
ware store and bought a steel
nail hammer for which I paid .60
cts thence to Dr Barbers office
and ordered him to come to
our house in the afternoon to
see little Raymond who is sick
with the croup.
{margin, other handwriting: I remember how
strange Ray looked in his white dress.}
Rode out on the trolley car and got
home at 12.30 had dinner of boiled
long clams, after which I choped
wood for a spell when the Doctor
came, He found that Raymond
was very sick with the Laringetis
and thought that he must have
the best of care.
He wrote out a prescription and
I wrode to town with him to
have it put up, Went to H. W.
Lakes, and got the medicine, while
it was being put up I went to
Currens drygood store and got
two Shaker nightgowns for
which I paid .50 cts, called at
Lakes and got the medicine for
which I paid .30 cts, rode home
with Charlie Brown, on Pierponts
Brothers heavy two horse team,
Charlie Hotchkiss and George
Cass came in the afternoon and we
made arrangements for the enter-
tainment at Grange Hall the evening
after Thanksgiving, after they went
Irving and I did the chores and
we ate supper of Bread, cake, cold
clams etc, after which I gave my
attention to Raymond till 11 o'clock
when I went to bed. Mary was to
call me when she got tired, but
did not and I slept till morning.

11\18\1898 (Friday)

It rained very hard this morning
and I did not go to work. Irving and
I went to the shop and got a load
of tools lumber etc, and brought home.
The doctor called at about 10 o'clock,
and found Raymond about the
same as he was yesterday. Went
to work at noon and worked till
{1.00} 5 o'clock, at Purdys, Wm Purdy
paid me off for last weeks work
10.75 came down to the Brass Mill
and brought Father home when I came.
When I got home I found Ramond
very sick it began raining at about
$6.30 and rained hard all the night
I stayed up all night and attended
to Raymond.

11\19\1898 (Saturday)

It has rained hard all day, Worked
about home, there is a slight improve-
ment in Raymonds health,
In the evening we went to Grange
Hall to a rehersal for the entertainment
next Friday evening. Those who are
to take part in it are Charlie Cass {diff. hand: Grampa},
Mrs Adelbert Hitchcock, George
Cass, Henry Cass, Charles Hotchkiss,
Willie Garrigus, Arthur Pierpont, Harry
Kilbourn, Joe Hucy, Bessie Garrigus,
Annie Garrigus, Minnie Garrigus,
Margaret Miller, Clara French,
Bertha French, and Ida Spender.
{other hand: I was the little girl who gave "Grandpa" his fife}
The entertainment was and old
Fashioned Thanksgiving supper,
We got home at about 10.30 went to bed at 11 o'clock.
Mary stayed up with Raymond.

11\20\1898 (Sunday)

Today the weather has been fine.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon and
listened to a sermon by Rev Mr Howell
of Simonsville, Called on Mr Tucker
this evening, stayed till nine o'clock.
He gave me some old shoes for the
children and some illustrated papers
of the Nations war ships, and heavy
guns. He intends to start in the
morning for New Boston Mass
where he intends to stay during
the winter.

((Monday)) 11\21\1898 (Monday)

Worked to day for Wm Purdy, 9
hours, The weather has been fair.
{2.25}

11\22\1898 (Tuesday) {2.25}

The weather has been fine today,
Worked for Wm Purdy 9 hours.
Had a rehersal at the Grange Hall this
evening.
Fifteen years ago this morning at 9 o'clock
I and my wife were married,
Bought a key of cider of Mr Bayley of East Moun-
tain for .60 cts 5 galls.

11\23\1898 (Wednesday) {2.25}

The weather has been nice to day
Worked for Purdy 9 hours.

11\24\1898 (Thursday)

This day is Thanksgiving. We got up a little
before 7 o'clock, and Irving did the chores
and Clyde and I went to drawing wood
from the shop. After drawing two loads
we had breakfast of stewed oysters,
after which we drew wood till 10 o'clock
after which we got ready and went
to Uncle Dwight Somers in Simons-
ville to the Somers family reunion.
Clyde and I walked, and Mary,
Irving, Margaret, Ruth, Pierpont,
and Raymond, wrode in the two
seated wagon. They set the table in the
Chapel, (Methodist) and 45 people sat down at
about two o'clock. There were nine absent.
The family consists of Uncle Dwight Somers
and Aunt Emogene, and cousins Robert
and Mary his wife, Joe and Lewis,
Father and Mother, and brother Frank and
wife Myself and wife, and children Clyde
Irving, Margaret, Ruth, Pierpont, and Raymond.
Uncle Joe Somers, and aunt Fan,
and Children, LIzzie, David and wife
Etta, Josie, Myra, (George not there) and
May,
Uncle Goldsmith and aunt Christine
and children, Jennie and husband
Charles Phillips, (Willie not there)
and Mary.
Uncle Ben and (wife not here)
Uncle Will and Aunt Ellen, and
(Fred not there)
Cousin Daivd Frisbie and wife
And cousin Frank and Burt,
Sister Mary and Roland Jenner, her
husband, and children, Louise and
[[Effel]] Ethol
and Sisters Cara and Iva,
There are Fifty four persons in all
but nine were absent. Uncle Dwight
was the older person aged 66 years and
my Raymond was the youngest, aged 3
years, after supper they had singing
and Recitations, after which Ice cream
was served, after which we retired to
Uncle Dwights house, and listened to
some fine singing by three young people
who were strangers to me, after which
we came home in the same manner
that we went. The snow lay on
the ground to the depths of two
inches, it having snowed all the
afternoon

11\25\1898 (Friday) {2.25}

Worked at Purdys 9 hours

11\26\1898 (Saturday) [[F]]

The weather this morning was rather
cold, but a little after noon it began
to snow and continued snowing
till night at six o'clock there lay
on the ground about three inches.
Went to work at Purdyes this morn-
ing we put the weather boards on the
barn, and shingled till the snow drove
us off at about 4 o'clock worked about
{2.12 1/2} 8 1/2 hours.

11\27\1898 (Sunday)

Awoke this morning to find the wind
blowing hard and the air full of snow
with great drifts on the ground.
We got up at about 8 o'clock and after
digging out the out bildings and
eating breakfast doing the chores etc,
Clyde Irving and I hitched the horse
into the old sled and went down to
Fathers with the milk, we found great
drifts but drove through them in
going there. From Fathers we went
to Ashtons corner and up the Meriden
road where we had to dig through
many of the drifts before we got
to the Chapel. We stoped at Charlie
Casses, and I told him that he
might take my bob sleigh to
peddle milk with, and he said
that he would come down with
me and get it. So we started home.
Steve Pardee* {diff hand: *milk peddler} accompying us and
Charlie was to come on with his
horse we reached John Frenches
and waited some time for Charlie.
When he came we started on
digging some of the time in the
drifts till we reached Mr Ables
when we left the road and went
through his yard and through
the fields to Mrs Doolittles
lower barn where we again
entered the road, and had a hard
time getting to my house, some
of the drifts being ten feet deep/
We went to my shop and got
the sleigh after which we came
home, the wind and snow still
blowing. This has been the
worst storm ever known in this
vicinity within the rememberence of
the older persons living, that has
occured in November, the snow has fallen
to the depth of two feet on the level.
We have heard a great deal of whistling
from factory whistles this forenoon the
cause of which we do not know.
Randolph and Clowes great roof of
their Rooling mill fell in at one o'clock
this morning from the weight of snow
on it. I have heard some of the old
people say that this roof was the first
iron truss and iron covered roof put
on in the United States, it was designed
for a four pitch roof, but was subsiquent-
ly changed for a gable roof, some had
fears years ago that it would not stand,
it was put on I think about 1860.
At the time that the roof was put on
Mr Thomas Payne who lived on
East Mountain was killed, His death
happened as follows,
His son Martain Payne had the
job of putting the roof on, and was
there at work, Mr Thomas wishing
to see him went to the building
and had just stepped inside the
door when a portion of the roof
gave way and let fall a lot of
lumber and iron which struck
Mr Payne killing him.
He and his wife had quarreled
that morning, and when he
started away she said she hoped
he might be brought home dead,
A few hours later as he was
brought into the house, she remark-
ed that, She was dam glad of it,
{diff hand: shame!!}
//temp end//


11\28\1898 (Monday)

This morning the snow is piled in
great drifts and the roads are everywhere
blacked, It reminds me of
the great storm of Mar 1888 when
it snowed from four o,clock{o,clack!} Sunday
night till the next Wednesday
forenoon, the snow lying at an
average depth of three and one
half feet and drifts were piled in
many places 12 and 14 fet high.
Out near Shelton Hitchcock
on the Meriden road there was
a drift higher thatn the tops of
the telegraph poles.
I thought that I would try and
make a pth through the Doolittle
road and was getting ready
when Hiram Able came and asked
me if I would help dig out the
road, I told him of my intentions{intentons!}
at which he seemed pleased.
We drove to the foot of the hill
by the book and began to dig,
and from thence it was continuous -
to the lower barn a distance
of nearly 1/4 of a mile and at one
place through a drift ten feet
deep. There was a clear place in
front of the Doolittle house but
at the upper barn a great drift
began and it was digging most
of the way to the brook near
John Frenches house, it took
till after four o'clock to get to Frenches
Clyde, Irving, Walter Garrigus,
Hiram Able, and myself in the
forenoon, and all but Walter
Garrigus in the afternoon.
After we were dug through I
gave Cla___{Clares?} and Bertha French,
a ride on the horse sled through
the drif_s{drifts?} to my house and my
wife go_{got?} on the sled and road back
to Mrs. Munsons, when we got home
it was quit_{quite?} _ark{dark?}.

{Notes in margin of text:

I remember this day -
We{he?} wore boy's pants - RMB

There was
no school
M.H.}

11\29\1898 (Tuesday)

This morning I started for work at
East Mountain on the horse sled,
But when I had crossed the long bridge
at the head of the Brass Mill pond I
found deep drifts all the way to
the Prospect road, and no track
beyond the Cass place.
Irving who was with me, went ahead
and picked out the best part of
the road and wallered{wallowed?} through the
drifts and I followed, we managed
to get through without digging,
and I got to work at 8 o'clock and
worked till five.

{Note in the margin at this line:

2.00}

Clyde and Irving came after _e{me?}
at five and we came home much
easier than we went over.

{Note in margin of text:

School this day.}

11\30\{1898} (Wednesday)

After breakfast this morning I
started for East Mountain on the
horse sled{slead!}, it was snowing very
hard, had quite a time getting{gettin!} through
the road that runs across the foot
of East Mountain, there was no one
there to help me and I did not work.
Came home{,?} and carried irving to school
going through the Doolittle road which
I have driven through six times to day
to keep it open, about 10 inches of
snow fell last night ant today.
Worked cutting wood most of the
time to day.
Wm Purdy paid me 6.00 this day.

12\01\1898 (Thursday)

Went to work for Mr. purdy this
morning, did not get there till 8.30
had a hard time getting through
the mountain road. Worked puttin_{putting?}
in the sleepers for the main floor.
Wm Clark did not come as he
had to open roads about the
town of Prospect, He being
first __lect man{Eelect man?}. This afternoon
a trin with two locomotived{lolomotives!} and
a snowplow pushed through the
Meriden Waterbury and Corm{?} River
Rail Road. They expect to start
regular trains running next monday.

Note in margin of text:
2.12 1/2 - crossed out
1.87 1/2

12\02\{1898} (Friday)

The weather today has been fine
for this time of year, Worked for
Purdy 8 1/2 hours laying barn floor

{Mathematical equation in margin of text}

12\03\{1898} (Saturday)

Went to work for Purdy this day.
Worked{Wokked!} 8 1/2 hr. On my way there I
met Willie Strong near the watering
trought and he asked me, Who anyon_{anyone?}
should see to buy a lot of in the Pine Grove
Cemetery and their cost etc, I afterwards
learnes{learned?} that Mr. Barnes little{liftle!} child died
this morning at 4 o clock this mornin_{morning?} of membrainous
{membrainaus!}
croup.
Mr. Barnes is Mr. Strong's
hired man, M
Mr. Hart worked with me to day
cutting and hauling{hawling1} sleepers for
the horse __rn{barn?} floor, we also hired{?}
eight of them.
When Clyde and I were coming
home tonight, as we were turning
the cor_er{corner?} by Mr. Casse_{Casses?} we
saw where _ome{some?} one{ane!} had been
tiped out of a sleigh. We learned
from George Cass who stoped the
horse{shorse!} that it was a Mrs. leonard
who lives on North Main Street
who was going to Hiram Able's
to see if she could hire a girl.
The horse ran all the way from
where Mr. _ass{Cass?} lives at the
corner of the Prospect road to
George Casses near the long bridge
at Ha___{Harpers?} ferry, and Mrs. Leonard
and her little girl ran after the horse
till she say{saw?} George Cass putting
the blanket on the horse through
the deep drifts most of{af!} the way
Miss Jennie Welton died
last night at about 8 o clock, the
particulars are as follows. She had been
to James Porter's to see about some sewing
to James Porter's to see about some sewing
and had started home with a bundle
of work. When just below my Father's
house Gus Painter who was going to
town with a horse and sleigh overtook
her as she was staggering about he
was trying to pass her When Will
Gillette came along and saw her and
told Painter that something was
the matter with her, she told them
her name and the number of the
hose she lived in on{an!} East Main
Street, they then took her in the
sleight and carried her home but she
died before they reached there
Charlie Hotchkiss is working for D. G. Porter
Arthur Blewitt having gone home on account
of his father's death. Purdy Paid me $10.00

Note in margin of text:
$10.00

12\04\1898 (Sunday)

The weather to day has been fair and
warm snow settled very much, it
began raining at about 3.30 and rained
hard when i went to bed.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon
{Next line difficult to read}
Mr. Parry Preached
The Chapel Committee approved the
bill of M_ss{Miss?} Bessie Garrigus of 15.00 as
organist{?} from May 1 to Dec 1, W also{We also?}
approved the bill of Dexter Northrop
for services as Janitor/janitor{?} of $10.00
When we came home we, mary, Irving
Margaret, Ruth Pierpont, Vernon{Vernom!}
Able, Florence{Fforence!} ABle and myself,
rode home on the horse sled.

12\05\{1898} (Monday)

It has been cloudy but has not stormed
to day, Worked for Purdy 9 hr.
Mr. Hart and Wm Clark worked
there, Hart and I hueing{?} and fitting
sleepers, and Clark making the cow
stables.
I suppose that the first trains run
on the Meriden, Middletown, and Waterbury
rail road to carry regular passengers.

Note in margin of text:
225

12\06\{1898} (Tuesday) {December is crossed out}

The weather to day has been fine for{fore!}
this time of year.
The first train that came in yesterday
morning __{on?} the new Meriden
Middletown and Waterbury Rail
Road brought three passengers, they
were Mort Pierpont, Howard and
Clerence{Clarance?} Worden, three school boys
who got on at East Farms.
Worked for Purdy 9 hr

Note in margin of text:
2.25

12\07\{1898} (Wednesday)

Weather to day has been fine.
Hiram Able had a son born to
him and his wife this morning
early.
Worked for William Purdy 9 hours.

Notes in margin of text:
2.25
Wilbur

12\08\{1898} (Thursday)

The weather to day ha been clear and
cool{coal!}. Worked for Purdy nine hours
Mother Pierpont is 70 years old to day.

Notes in margin of text:
2.25
Mathematical equation in margin of text

12\09\{1898} (Friday)

The weather to day has been Cool,
but clear most of the time.
Worked for Purdy 9 hours
Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening.

Note in margin of text:
2.25

12\10\{1898} (Saturday)

Worked for Wm Purdy 9 hours to day

Note in margin of text:
2.25

12\11\1898 (Sunday)

Went to ___{the?} Chapel and heard Mr.
Rafter of the Waterville Episcopal{Episcapal!} Church
preach. There was collected 2.21 which
I gave to Mr. Able.

12\12\{1898} (Monday)

It began snowing a little after
dinner and snowed all the afternoon
Worked for Wm Purdy 9 hours
He paid me today 11.00{?} which squares{squairs!}
us up to a w__k{week?} ago last Saturday night

12\13\1898 (Tuesday)

Got up at half past five, the weather was very
cool, built the two fires called Irving, fed
horse, and coon breakfast was ready
had pancakes, started for work at half
past six, drove to Purdy's on the horse{harse!}
cled, about one and one half inches
of snow fell during the night.
Wm Clark and I worked finishing
the horse stables.
Pierpont came at 11.38 with a letter
delivered by special delivery by the
post boy{bay!} from Mr. Tucker who is in
New Boston, Wanting me to see Fred
Brainard in Southington and have
him meet him in Winsted next
Thursday evening about the insurance{inshurance!}
on{an!} the old shear shop, I stoped work
at noon, drove home and after getting

[[Note in margin, presumably recording hours of work??
1.25 {Is this 1.00 crossed out and 1.25 written on top of it?}]]

warm, and eating dinner, started
for Soughington in my spindle buggy.
Went through east Farms and over
the mountains at Hitchcocks Pond_{Ponds?},
the riding was cold and rough some
of{af!} the way the old drifts were five
feet deep, went through marion, to
Mill dale{,?} _here{where?} I stoped at the brick
shop{shap!} at D_ckermans{Dickermans?} corner and inquired
for Brainard.
They d rected{directed?} me East across{acass!} the Quinnapiac{?}
River to Stillmans corner then
thru, North till I reach an abandoned
paper mill _hen{then?} go a little way and
turn to the right and go through the
lots to a little shop{,?} and I would find
him, I went as directed and found
him as directed, polishing bicicle{bycicle!}
wrenches, _{I?} told hime what I had come{came!}
for, and he said he would go.
I drove home as soon as possible reaching
there a li____{little?} after six very cold, the
themometer regirstng{in the 1935-38 manuscripts, usually
spelled regerstering} zero, at Nine
it was six below
The treaty of Peace between this
Country and Spain were signed at
Paris last Saturday evening at
8:45 o clock. The american signers
were, Judge William, R Day, Senator{Senetor!}
Crishman K{?} DAvis, Senator{Senetor!} Fry,
Mr. Reid{Reed?} and Senator{Senetor!} George Grey.
The Spanish signers were, Senor
Mortero, Rias, Senor. Abarzuza{Alarzuza?}, Senor
G__nica{Gurnica?}, Senor Vallauruti{?} and
General Cerero Saens.

[[There is a note in the margin of the text that indicates
the paragraph that begins with "The Spanish signers ..."
The note is the following:
Red ink in
Original
LLD 5/17/89 {probably 1989, when xeroxed]]

Each commissioner signed his
opponents{oponents!} treaty. Both were tied
with the Spanish and American
Colars
The treaty provides that Cuba is
to be relinquished from Spain,
and that Puerto Rico{Porto Rico!} and the Phillipine
Islands are to be ceded to
the United States. The U.S. are to
pay for the repatriation of the
Spanish troop_{troops?} from all the Colonies{Calanies?}.
The Spanish are to return
all prisoners held by them.
They are to retain all military stores
and munition of war in the Phillipines
and such ships as have not
been captured.
I think that in the long run
it would be better to have settled
some other way than by annexing
the Phillipines, The Nations of
the East are jealous of us, and
this act, wll{will?} add fuel to the
smouldering fire that is burning
which will some time break out
and cause more trouble than it
would if we had accepted a war
indemnity, or even forced them
to pay it.


12\14\1898 (Wednesday)

This morning the thermometer{themometer!} stood at
14 degrees below zero.

I got ready and went to town on the
trolley went first to the Waterbury
bank and had a twon order cashed
for 5.60 after which I went to the
central telephone station and telephones{teleplane_!}
Mr. Tucker at New Boston Mass that
Mr. Brainard and I would meet
him{?} at the Winchester hotel in
Winsted tomorrow afternoon for
which I paid 25{?} cts. went thence{?}
to the Select mans office and had my
Military tax ab__ted{?} on account of
disability{dishability!}, then came home, and ate
dinner and went to work at Purdys{?}
3 1/2 hr.

{Note in margin of text:
.88}

After supper went to th Chapel and
had another{?} supper for which I paid
10 cts, went over to the Grange Hall to
a poultry show, there were but few there
paid 15 cts admissions, came back to
the Chapel where the Entertainment
was going on Mr. Rolph Blakeslce{?}
was giving a Grapaphone Enterta_nueul{?}
which was the best I ever heard.

{New paragraph?}

They also had some fine singing.

Came home and arranged{arrainged!} a short
discourse which I intend to give at
the grange, and wrote this matter
which took till midnight.

12\15\{1898} (Thursday)

This morning after doing the
barn chores, and some other regular
work, I did up the horse's leg, which he
calked in going to Southington. Then
I had to hustle to get rady to go to
Winsted, to see Mr. Tucker and a lawyer
from Hartford, about the insurance
on the Old Shear Shop{?} which burned
Oct 19th 1896.

I took the trolley car at East Main
Street near Silver, and went to Waterville
where I arrived at 11 O'clock, paid
05 ct fare. At 11.10 took steam cars for{far!}
Tarrington, got there at 12. Went{Wen!} and got
shaved for which I paid 10 cts, at One
Oclock took th trolley cars for Winsted
where I arrived at about two
Oclock, got off at the Winchester
Hotel, met Mr. Tucker at the door,
Went across{acrass!} the street and met
Fred Brainard in __{?} restaurant{restaurent!},
waited there, while M_{Mr.?} Tucker went
to the Depot to meet his son Horace{Harace!}
who was coming from the Cheshire
Military Acadamy{Acadeniey!}. on a three weeks
vacation. Went to mr. Tuckers
room in the Winchester and waiter for
Mr. Fullter{?} to come from Hartford. He arrived
at a little after four, and Mr. Branard{?} told
him all about the machinery{machnery!} in the old
shop which took till six when we went
to supper, in a spacious dining hall with
a fine tile floor, a big Nigger sat the chair
under me to sit down in and gave me lots
of attention, as he did the rest, I hardly
thought this necessary on my part, for
I am only too glad to sit down without
help if I can{cam!} get what is good to eat.
First they brought on beefsteak and browned
potatoes and onions, biscuits{buiscuits!} and butter
coffee, next eggs and{an!} toast after cleaning
most of the dishes o__{off?}, brought on other
courses{carses!}, the most of which I have now
forgotten, the last was, clear glass
bowls{bowles!} _ith{with?} a little water in the
bottom, served on china plates, for
each of us. I wondered what these
were, but soon saw Mr. Tullere{?} dip
his fingers in his bowl and wipe
them on his napkin{knapkin!}, I did not follow
his example as I had not practiced
and feared I might be awkward.

After supper we went to Mr. Tuckers
room and and{written twice} talked awhile{a whill!}, after
which Mr. Tuller{?} and Tucker went
to find a typewriter{typewritter!} to copy{coppy!} off
his short hand, and Fred Brainard{?}
and I took a walk out to
West Winsted.

After we returned, mr. Brainard
and Fuller{?} went to their rooms, and
Mr. Tucker and I staid together{to gather!}.
{new paragraph?}
We took a bath and went to bed.

12\16\1898 (Friday)

Got up about Seven, Mr. Fuller
Mr. Tucker and I had breakfast, Horace{Harace!}
also, together{togather!}. Mr. Brainard had
ate before us and had taken an
early train for home, after breakfast
I read over the testimony which I
had given Mr. Fuller the evening before
and which he had written out, after which
Mr. Tucker and Fuller went to the barroom{?}
and got a drink, as I have never tasted{taisted!}
any drink stronger than cider I did
not go, Mr. Fuller, Horace{Harice!}, and I, drove
up to the Solders{Souldiers!} monument, where
we had a fine view of Winsted and
the adjoining country. The monument
is a fine one, and the location grand.

After we returned to the Hotel it was
nearly time for my train, so I left
the rest of the party and went to the
Naugatuck depot where I bought my
ticket for Waterbury for which I paid
75 cts, took the cars and in due time
reached Waterbury, where I took the
trolley and arrived{arived!} home at noon.

AFter dinner drew wood from
the shop which was portions{partions?} of
the ld burned shear factory.
{New paragraph?}
In the evening went to the Grang

Mrs. Weeks died Wednesday in
Wolcott, aged 78, she lived on{one?} mile
South of the Center, at the foot of
the hill near the Fair grounds.

Julinia Hall of Woodtick fell from
a haymow in her barn yesterday
and fever{feaver!} has set in and now{nou!} she
is very sick.

12\17\1898 (Saturday)

Went to work this morning
for wm Purdy, worked 9 hours.

Mr. Larmon Johnson{?} died this
morning in the 93rd year of her age,
She lived the third house East of here
on the south side of the road.

{Note in margin of text:
2.25}

This evening went to see Hiram
Able and paid _im{him?} $1.60 which I
received{recived!} from the Town for his pay
for helping to dig out the Doolittle
road, after the Great storm, Agness{?}
wished me to clean and repair her
melodian, and I went at it and
did not get through till after 11,o'clock

12\18\{1898} (Sunday)

The weather to day has been fine.

Went to Chapel this afternoon, Mr.
Bassett of the Farm Street Methodist
Church preached. Collected 2.21 which
I carried and gave to Agness to give
t_{to!} her father Hiram Able.

{Note in the margin of text:
Chapel}

12\19\{1898} (Monday)

Worked for Wm Purcy this day,
9 hours, the Weather has been fine
but it looks{tooks!} like storm tonight.

Mrs. Johnson was buried this
afternoon from Mill Plain Chapel
The Rev M {blank space in text} officiated and Edward
Welton{?}, Wilson{Wilsan!} Pierpont, John French,
and Charles Monroe{?} were Pall bearers.

{Notes in margin of text:
2.25
Chapel}

12\20\{1898} (Tuesday)

It was very stormy this day, did not
go to work till 8 O,clock.

{Note in margin of text:
2.00}

12\21\{1898} (Wednesday)

Wormed for Wm Purdy on his barns
8 1/2 hours to day.

{Note in margin of text:
2.12 1/2}

There was an entertainment given
in the Grange Hall at Prospect this
evening, entitled "the Comrades"
{new paragraph?}
This morning when I went to work
this morning I saw George Cass and
he wanted to go and have all go
that could, so when I got home
this evening I fixed two seats
on the old _ring{pring?} and sent Clyde{Clyd!}
to see if Agness Able{?} would go
with us, She would, Mary,
Clyde, Agness and Myself went
on the pring, Charlie Hotchkiss
took Bertha French, Arthur
Pierpont took Bessie Garrigus
and George Cass did not go,
He had to work getting ice for the
Mill Plain Ice Co.

We had a good time and the
play was nice, the attendance{attendence!}
filled the hall.

About Prospect Center the trees
were heavily{heavly!} ladened with ice, got home
and went to bed at one Oclock.

12\22\{1898} (Thursday)

Spent this forenoon in cutting pices
of printed matter from a pile of news
papers I have saved and pasting{paisting!} them
in my scrap book

Went to work a_{at?} Purdys at noon
and worked four hours
{Note in margin of text:
1.00}

Went to the Grange this evening,
had election of Officer.
{New paragraph?}
The following were elected
Master Arden H Coe,
Overseer John Gallagher,
Lecturer Arthur Pierpont
Treasurer John R S Tood{?},
Chaplain David G Porter{?},
Steward Harry Coe,
Assistant Steward Adelbert Hitchcock
Secretary Anna Hale
Cerics Girtrude Bradley
{next line is difficult to read}
Pomana{?} Mr. John Gallagher{?}
Flora, Mrs. Thomas Fairclough.
Outside Gatekeeper Joe Huey
Lady assistant Steward Edith
Pierpont
Executive Committe John Gallagher{?}
It rained very hard when we came home
at midnight

12\23\{1898} (Friday)

Did not get up this morning
till Seven Oclock, and went to
work at 9 worked throught the
noon hour till 5 O'clock, came
home and ate dinner and Supper
together{togather!}. Charlie Hotchkiss came
over druymming and Irving{?} and
I took our drums and we marched
to John Frenches it being very
hard marching over the snow
drifts and rough road.

Came{word difficult to read} home at eleven.

{Note in margin of text:
2.25}

12\24\{1898} (Saturday)

Worked about home all day, began
digging for the foundation of my new
blacksmith shop down near the brook
{New paragraph?}
In the evening George Cass came
and we set his drum head.

12\25\{1898} (Sunday)

This is Christmas day the Children
were up early and had a happy time
taking the presents from their stockings{?}

Went to the Chapel this afternoon
the REv Mr{?} Davenport preached
{new paragraph?}
Brother Fred was there with his
wife having come{came!} from Detroit
yesterday, he was noticed quite a
little on{an!} account of his fine bass
singing.

12\26\{1898} (Monday)

This day hs been observed as
Christmas. All of the Miller FAmily
met at Fathers there were 22 who sat
down to dinner.

In the evening we had a tree which
was much enjoyed by the children

12\27\1898 (Tuesday)

The weather has been fair to day
but rather cold. This evening Mary
Irving{Iirving!} Agness Able and Myself went
to Woodtick to an entertainment
which was given in the Chapel there
{new paragraph?}
Had a fine time, reached house
and went to bed at 11 Oclock.

Wm Purdy Paid Clyde 2.50 on account{accout!}
{next line difficult to read}
for me.

{Note in margin of text, difficult to read:
2.50{?}}

12\28\1898 (Wednesday)

The weather to day has been very
cold, worked most of the day digging
for the foundation of my Blacksmith
shop. This evening went to the Chapel
to the supper given by the Ladies{Laidies!}
Union, mary and all of the children
attended, and had supper there.

12\29\{1898} (Thursday)

Worked to day 7 hours on the watertrough{watertraugh?}
at east farms repairing the pipes.

12\30\1898 (Friday)

To day Clyde, Irving and I worked 7
hours on the watering trough at East
Farms. 14 hours @{?} .25=3.50 Material .50=4.00

12\31\1898 (Saturday)

Arose this morning at SEven O'clock
it being cloudy was quite dark, did
the barn chores before breakfast, ate
breakfast of boiled beef and potatoes
at eight the{then?} cut fire wood till about
10.30 when we set about making a
forge to shoe the horse with in the new
building, we took a barrel and sowed
off the top end down about 6 inches
then filled it with sand to within
6 inches of the top and set in a ducks
nest tuyer{tire?} iron with the pipe
projecting through the bunghole
of the barrell, then attached a
Roots Rotery{Rotary?} blower, had it nearly
completed at dinner time, at dinner
at 12 of. Beef pie and clam chowder,
and rice pudding{,? text hard to read} after dinner finished
the forge and sharpened the horse
by which time it was hailing and
snowing quite hard. Clyde, F Pierpan_{Pierpont?}
and I went to town to get some groceries
First went to my shop after a maple plank
but had to move so much lumber to get
it that we could wait no longer, So we
went to the Waterbury Lumber Co
to see if I could sell them a lot of plank
thence to the City Lumber & Coal Co
but could not sell an_{any?},{?} so we went to
the City Fish Market where we bought
a pint of opened oysters for 15 cts and some
crackers for .08{08?} cts per pound, thence to
Heaters Grocery store where we bought
several bundles of groceries, thence
to Spencer & Pierponts feed store and
bought a bag of meal for .95 cts and then
home, Irving and I did the chores, then
had supper of stewed oysters, after which
I picked the feathers off a duck, and then
read in 4th vol, of Washington Irvings life
of Washington. This is the last day
of the year, on looking back twelve
months I recall many reverses, but
hope the next year will prove more prosperous.

Charles Somers Miller
Journal Entries for
1899

01\01\1899 (Sunday)

New years day

Commenced the year by getting up
at half past eight, the weather being
very cold and snow still falling.

Built the two fires and then, Clyde,
Irving, and myself dug out the
paths and did the chores, after which
we ate breakfast of baked beans,
after which we hitched the horse in
the sled{slead!} and the Boys and I drove to
Munsons corner and back to make
a path, after that I set a steel trap in
a shallow box of bran in the cellar under
the potato bin for rats, and in a little
while caught{cought!} one. Then got ready and
Ruth, Pierpont, and Margaret went
to Sunday school{written as 1 word}, and Mary and I
went to the service. Mr. Parry
preached, there were but thirty
four present, there are settings{sittings?} for
about One Hundred and forty in
the Chapel. Mary rode home with
Mr. Worden{?}, and I walked home, by
way of the Doolittle road, gave Agness
Able $1.00 which was collected to give
to her father, as we came by
her house she looked at the thermometer{thermameter!}
and it stood 8 degrees above zero
when I got home mine{myne!} was at zero
it is now 7 below at half past eight.

01\02\1899 (Monday)

At seven o'clock the thermometer{thermameter!} stood at
20 degrees below zero. After breakfast of
baked duck, we run the washing machine
after which I measured the height{hight!} of all
the children, Raymand{?} was 3 ft 3 1/2 in
tall Frank Pierpont, 3' 9", Ruth 4' 3"
Margaret 4' 6", Irving 4' 9", and Clyde
5' 7" inches, they have all grown over
two inches since last new years.
Went down to the shop and got out some
plank to have some sled runners{?} sawed
out of, and brought home a load of
fire wood, Mary and Clyde went
to town this afternoon to get some
clothes for Clyde to wear to school
tomorrow, Irving and I dug a ditch
down in the swamp, after{aftere!} which we did
the chores Clyde and mary coming in
the meantime, and had supper of hasty{?}
pudding and molasses, after{aftere!} which I
made some molasses candy.

At twelve o'clock yesterday{yester day?} the United
States flag was unfurled over Cuba
It now floats over the wreck of the
Battle ship Maines.

01\03\1899 (Tuesday)

Went to East Mountain this forenoon
to see Miles Payne{text difficult to read} about some
work he wanted me to do. In the afternoon
repaired a wolf roab{?}, Wilson Pierpont
called and wanted me to put a draw{drow?}
bar in his horse sled, I went to work
at it and had it finished before work {???}
night, for which I charged 90 cts

01\04\{1899} (Wednesday)

Went to work in the dark this morning{?}
for Thomas M Paynes{?}
Worked _ll{till?} noon when I had to stop
on account of the rain.

{note in margin of text:
5 hr}

01\05\{1899} (Thursday)

This day the ground has been very
wet, worked about home all day.
{New paragraph?}
Figured up and found that I
had done Eighty nine dollars and
ninety eight cents worth of work
for William Purdy on his ba_n{barn?} of
which he owed me 27.24 now.

Mary and Irving went to
town this afternoon in the spindle
buckboard. Mary and I went
to the Grange{Grandge?} this evening, there
were but few there about 18
{New paragraph?}
Chas Cass is very sick with
appendicitis{a pendicitas!} his wife is also sick
as is Arthur Pierpont and many
others, with the Grip.

01\06\1899 (Friday)

It has rained most of the day
and at the present is raining hard.
I have staid a{at?} home, and worked
at odd jobs. The whole family is
sick more or less with the grip.

01\07\{1899} (Saturday)

Everything was frozen up this morning
the weather having grown cold during
the night.

After doing the chores Clyde and I went
to town I to the Barbers shop and had my
hair cut and was shaved for which I
paid 30 cts.{.?} Clyde bought oysters and
crackers, also went to the Apothacaries
hall and bought a little vaseline{vasalene!} bottle
full of shellack{?} for which he paid 20 cts,
came home and hitched into the
horse sled, and carried Mrs. Hesplelts{?}
sewing machine home which I had
repaired. Went by way of the Meriden
road and stoped and saw Charlie
Cass. He is a little better, his wife
Tracy is also sick with a complication
of diseases{deseases!} in the same bed
with him, she is better also.

After leaving the sewingmachine{1 word?}
went to my old shop and drew
a sled load of bolts home, got stuck
at the foot of the hill and had to
unload part of them, and go back
and get them. Drew another load
this afternoon. Fred and Addie lef_{left?}
for Detroit this forenoon at 10.50 expect
to reach there at noon tomorrow.

Mary is sick with the Grip and it is
hard for her to get around.

01\08\{1899} (Sunday)

Staid home all day, except that I
went to he Chapel and heard Rev
Mr Rafter preach.
{new paragraph?}
There was collected $1.20

Wrote a letter to Mr. Tucker at
New Boston Mass.

01\09\{1899} (Monday)

Worked to day 9 hours for Miles
Paynew on East Mountain, at
making new doors{doars!}, and rep{?} doors
for his blacksmith shop.

{note in margin of text:
1.80}

Wm Purdy Paid me 7.50
{new paragraph?}
The Hall Upson Co began cutting
ice with 20 men and 9 horses on the Brass
Mill pond this morning. When I came
home tonight they had cut over an
acre of ice and got it in. The stearn{? word difficult to read}
incline draws the ice into the houses
very fast.

01\10\1899 (Tuesday) {1898 was written as the year}

Got up this morning at 5 o'clock.
The weather being quite cool,
went to work for Thomas Miles Payne
on East Mountain repairing his
Blacksmith shop. Went to painting
it at 3 O'clock, but the weather was
so cold that I stoped at 4, working
8 1/2 hr. I helped{helpt!} build the shop 19 years
ago, and I remember that William
Pratt{?} the ownder said quite a little
about painting it right away. Little
did I think than that I would be
painting it for the first time now.

{note in margin of text:
1.70}

When I got home the Thermometer{Themometer!}
was at zero. I was very cold and
glad to get by the fire. By
appointment Robert Worden
Morris Alcott and myself
were to go to see <_{Mr.?} Parry of
the First Baptist{Baptis!} church on Grand
Street, about giving a lecture
at the Chapel. I did not think
that they would come on account
of the cold. But at 6.30 Mr. Worden
came from the East and Mr.
Alcott from the North. I was
just changing{chainging!} my clothes, as
the Committee of the Ladies{Lades!}
Union were to meet here tonight.

Was ready in a few minutes
and we drove to town in Mr.
Wordens{wordens!} carriage; the horse traveled
very fast, and I got very cold.

Put the horse in Nortons.{.?} Livery
stable, and we went to Dr. Parrys
house on North Willow street.

Found him in and he very pleantly{pleasantly?}
arranged to give a lecture and
stereoptican entertainment{entertainmint!} at
the Chapel some future time. The
State Grange are holding their meeting
now in Waterbury in the City Hall
it opens todya and continues till
Thursday{?} afternoon.

Came home and found Mrs. Worden
Mrs. Alcott, Mrs. Thoedore Munson,
and Agness Able making arrangements
to give the Chapel Fair the
8th{8the!} and 9th of next month.

They staid till 10 o'clock when
they started fo_{for? home? word is smudged}, Clyde carried
Mr. and Mrs. Alcott home in the
buggy, it being very cold 4 below
zero.

01\11\{1899} (Wednesday)

Staid home all day, and in the house
most of the time as it was too{to!} cold for
me, the thermometer{thernometer!} has been below{blow!}
the freezing point all day.

Dr. Axtelle called to see James Porter
who had the barn door fall on him
and hurt his side. Mary, Clyde, and
Irving have gone to the Chapel to the supper{scupper!}

01\12\{1899} (Thursday)

This morning it was very cold and I
did not go to work for Miles Payne till
10.30 worked painting his shop, 5 1/2 hr

{Note in margin of text:
1.10}

Drove home and found a letter from
Father wanting me to come down and
see him before he went down town to night
{new paragraph?}
Went and saw him.

He told me that he thought he knew
that I could get work at Rogers Bro's
at Blacksmith and carpenter work

Mary and I went to the Grange{Grang!} and saw
___{the? word difficult to read} installation of Officers, came home
at 12.30 and went to bed.

01\13\{1899} (Friday)

Did not go to work this morning as
it rained and froze, worked about
home all day.

01\14\{1899} (Saturday)

Did not get up till seven o'clock this
morning as I did not expect{?} to go
to work as it was raining hard.
{new paragraph?}
Soon after I was up, T{F?} Miles Payne drove
into the yard and wanted me to help
him today. I told him that I would
and he went{wen!} to town, and I ate my
breakfast, then Clyde carried me
up the mountain, I went to work
on a buggy that ws{was?} there pretty well
smashed.

It seem that Henry Pullen who
lives at Prospect center and works
at the Mattatuck shop, started for
work this morning{mornind!} with his two
daughters{doughters!}, but when they got to the
top of the hill by the City Reservoir
the front axle broke and started the
colt which he was driving on a dead
run, In going down the hill the
girls were thrown out and soon
after mr. Pullen let go the horse
and was thrown to one side of the
road, one{ane!} of the girls had her legs
skinned some and all{?} were bruised{?}{,?}
the horse had a bad cut on the hind
leg, The horse continued on down
the mountain and ran into Mr.
Micacks{?} team and threw him
and a man that was with him out
hurting the man that was with
Mr. Mycack, in the shoulder{shouldier!},
The horse ran to the watering trough
down the mountain where he ran
into a barbed wire fence and got
entangeled and they caught him there.

Mr. Payne and I repaired the
two buggys{buggyes!} which were pretty{prety!} well
smashed.

Yesterday William Gillette
went to Prospect to investigate the
case of Mattie Woods a colored girl.

It seems that a neighbor of Grant
Wheeler, who lives at Gilletts Corner{?}
whill{while?} passing his house, day before
yesterday, was attracted by a colored{colosed!}
girl waving{waiving!} her hand at the garrett
window. She informed him that
she was locked in the garrett and
was very cold, that the Wheelers were
in the habit of locking her up
there every time they went away.
{new paragraph?}
The neighbor came to town and notified
Constable William Gillette who is also a
humane officer, and yesterday he went
out to investigate. In the mean time the
girl had escaped from the attic and found
shelter at a neighbors{neighbars?} that night and
the next morning he took her to David
B. Hotchkiss'who is a justice-of-the-peace.

There{Ther!} Constable{Constible!} Gillette and Sheriff
Rigney{?} found her. Mr. Hotchkiss asked
them if they wanted to see her as she
was then, or as she was when she came
there. They wanted to s_e{see?} her as she came,
So the Women fixed her up in the same
duds he had on{an!}, an old wornout mans
shirt with{witte!} only sleve{?}, a dress made{maid!}
of two old oat bags sewn{sewned!} together{togather!},
a pair of stockings without any feet
and a pair of worn mens shoes with
out laisings/lassings{lacings?}, she had no underclothing,
{new paragraph?}
Mattie Woods is 19 years old, and has
been with the Wheelers three years.
{new paragraph?}
Her parents are dead and she was
obtained{abtained!} through a New York agency{ggency!}
from the south.

For the last three weeks she has been
obliged{obiged!} to sleep in the garrett without
bed or clothin of any account, and on
New Years night when the thermometer{themometer!}
was 20 degrees below zero she froze{frove!} her
hands. She has not been{ben!} allowed to go
out of doors except to do errands about the
farm.

Mr. Gillette notifed State agent Thrall{?}
of the Connecticut Humane society
and he came here this morning and
and{written twice} warrants{warrents!} were sworn out for the
arrest of the Wheelers, charging them
with assault and cruelty{creuelty!}.
{new paragraph?}
Worked 7 1/2 hr Payne paid me 7.00

{note in margin of text:
1.50}

01\15\1899 (Sunday)

Went to th Chapel to day the Rev
Mr. Hannon{?} of the first M.E. Church
preached.

01\16\{1899} (Monday)

This day worked for _iles{Miles!} Payne on the
mountain painting his shop. 6 hr

{note in margin of text:
1.20}

01\17\{1899} (Tuesday)

Fine weather today.

Worked for Miles Payne painting his shop
7 1/2 hr

{note in margin of text}
1.50}

01\18\{1899} (Wednesday)

This morning the weather was clear and
old, most of the ground is bare, but in
some places ___{the?} remnants of old drifts
remain.

After doing the chores, (did not get up
till 7 o'clock) hitched up and started
for prospect to attend the trial of
Mr. Grant Wheeler and wife
defendant{defendent!}, and Mattie Wood
a colored girl 19 years of age Plaintiff

It was tried in the Town hall under
the Church, court{cort!} was called at 10.30.
Justice Anderson, of this city presided
and Judge Cowell _as{was?} for Mattie
and Judge Lowe for the defendant{defendent!}.

The charge was Cruelty and assault,
The case was brought by William Gillette
agent for the Connecticut humane society.

The witnesses for the state were, Mr.
and Mrs. John Marss{?}, Mr. George
Talmage Mr. Minor Blackman, Mr.
and Mrs. David B. Hotchkiss, Mr.
George Mass, Mr. Moses{Mases!} Chandler, Mr.
William Gillette.

Most of the witnesses tried to evade
the direct facts as they knew them,
on account of neighborly relations,
but all testified facts showing that
Mattie Woods was cruelly treated
by Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler.

When Mattie Wood took the stand
she recited a tale{tail!} the most harrowing
of anything I could imagine for
a country like this.

She had worked for the Wheelers
three years coming there April 1st{?}
1896{?}, came from 8 miles west of
Lynchburgh Va, worked 3 months
to pay for her car fare here and
then made an arrangement{arraingment!} with
Mrs. Wheeler by which she was to receive{recive!}
6 dollars a month after,
{new paragraph?}
The next spring as sh_{she!} water some little
chickens in a pan ___{one?} got in and was
drowned, for which she was horsewhippe_{horsewhipped?}
by Mr. Wheeler, afterward one{ane!} duck was
drowned in the same manner for which
she received{recived!} another horsewhipping.

The next Christmas day she was put
to digging a path from the house to
the road, and her hands getting very
cold she went into the house to war_{warm?}
them, for which she was struck with
a stick of wood and kiced{kicked?} out doors
again by Mr. Wheeler.

At another time she was bringing
in wood from the pile and putting
it into the barrel back of the stove
where she happened to upset a pa_{pan?}
of dough that was on a swing
shelf back of the stove, for which
she was struck with a stick of wood
by Mrs. Wheeler and cut upon the
head, which made her scream, and
Mr. Wheeler tied a towel over her
mouth for a gag.

Several times when she was left
alone in the house, Mrs. Wheeler locked{?}
her in the kitchen, tied the outside door
on the outside with a rope and locked
the door leading to the diningroom
with a key, nailed the windows down
and sprinkled flour{flower!} on the window
sills and tops to see if she disturbed
them{theme?}.

She ran away and went to town
but Mr. Wheeler came after her and
promised to pay her what was due
and a few days after gave her $8.00
but before night borrowed{barrowed!} it back
again, and in fact has never given
her any money since.
{new paragraph?}
Since she has been there she has had
$6.00{$16.00?} cash 1 dress which cost 1.00 one{ane!}
that cost 1.16 and Mrs. Wheeler{wheeler!} charged
1.00 each for making one pair of shoes
which cost{cast!} 1.00 one{ane!} pair which cost
1.50, one pair of stockings which cost
12 cts, one pair mittens which cost .25
two rappers{?}, and t__{two?} hats, the price of
which I have forgotten, and day before
yesterday Mr. Wheeler went to
Mr. Hotchkiss and force_{forced?} her to take
$15.50 and give him a rec_pt{receipt? recipt?} in full for
all wages due her.

At one time Mrs. Wheeler went to
Waterbury and l___{word is smudged} Mattie ironing and
when she returned said that she had
not{note!} done the ironing good and took
the teakettle{teakittle!} of boiling water from the
stove and poured{pored!} some of it _pon{upon?} her
bare feet.

At another time when she had been
up to George Talmages house and returned
Mr. Wheeler s_apped{snapped?} a revolver in
her fact to frighten her.

At another time she was sent up stairs
and Mr. Wheeler wne tup with the oxwhip
and whipped her till the blood flowed
freely.

As she was paring{pairing!} potatoes Mrs.
Wheeler said she was not paring{pairing!}
them thin enough and taking the
butcher knife from the table struck
at her, she raised her hand in
defense{defence!} and her finger met the
knife which cut a piece out of her
little finger, which was still sore
{new paragraph?}
Mrs. Wheeler even denied{denighed!} her the
privilege of winding a rag about
it.

She said that she had been whipped
5 times with the horse whip and three times
ith an ox whip.

She was allowed the food from
he same table that the family ate
for a spell at first after her food
was of a courser{corser!} kind and after
a time she was given course{corse!} meal
wetted{?} up in a little pail with water
and sent out into the back entry
to eat it.

At one time she asked for salt
and Mrs. Wheeler told her that they
only salted their cattle once a week
{new paragraph?}
Another, she was eating and Mrs.
Wheeler called her little girl and told her to see
the animal eat.

_ast{Last?} Christman The Wheelers has company
to dinner and had a bountiful supply of
vituals, and they gave her a little pail
full of oat meal wet up with water and
sent her up stairs __{to?} eat it. The meal
had been kept a long time and the rats
had nested in it, and it was so full of
rat leavings that she could only eat
about two spoonfuls{stoonfulls!}.

As she was washing a pan of turnip par____{parings?}
stood on{an!} a shelf in reach,{,?} and she reached
to get some to eat when Mr. Wheeler who
was coming in with an armful{armfull!} of
wood beat her over the head with a
stick of appletree.

She has been s_ut{shut?} _n{in?} the garrett
8 times all night since Christmas
{new paragraph?}
Mr. Wheeler taking her clothes from
her and giving her a_{an?} old lettered{lettered?} blue
skirt, there was _{a?} coff__{coffin?} in the garrett
but no bed an_{and?} ___{word smudged} old army overco_t
{overcost? overcoat?}
that was ther_{there? word smudged} which she used
Was taken from her, several nights
the thermometer{themometer!} was below zero,
and she froze her feet and fingers
in consciquence{consequence?}, which{whch!} are now
swollen and peeling{pealing!}.

For over an hour she told her story
on{an!} the direct examination,
and for an hour and one half
she withstood the most rigid cross
examination that I ever heard
and Judge Loure{?} failed to s_ake{shake?}
her testimony in the l_ast{least?}

It corresponded{carrosponded!} with the testimony{testomy!}
of the witnesses exactly.

The Wheelers live at Gilletts
Corner and ar_{are?} I should judge{Judg!judg!} about
30 years of age, they have one child
a little girl

They were bou_d{bound?} over to the
next turn of the Superior cort{court?}
under b_nds{bonds? bands?} of $1400.00 each, which
as furnished by, Byran Mass.
and Mr. Hunter of Naugatuck.

01\19\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked to day for Miles Payne pa__ting{painting? paniting!}
his shop and putting supports under the
floors. 5 1/2 hr

Mary and I went to the Grange
tonight.

{Note in margin on text:
1.10
_ll{all?} 10.90
_er{?} 7 00
________
3 90}
{the above note is difficult to read}

01\20\{1899} (Friday)

Worked 5 hr to day for Miles Payne
and finished painting his shop.
{new paragraph?}
The balance due was $4.90 he paid me
3.00 which left a balance of 1.90 now
due me. Wm Purdy paid me 5.00

{Note in margin of text:
1.00}

01\21\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked about home all day, the weather
fine. Drew 6 loads of wood from the
shop.

01\22\{1899} (Sunday)

Weather warm and nice, went to the
Chapel this afternoon, Dr. Davenport
preached.

01\23\{1899} (Monday)

The weather to day has been warm and
nice, worked about home. This morning_{morning? mornings?}
run the washing machine and then
blasted out rocks.

Went this evening and saw{sow!} Henry
Buckingham about getting work
at Rogers Bros factory.
{new paragraph?}
Then to Mr. Tuckers place and put
two{tuo?} bolts on doors, visited with Chas
Cass and family, and then came home.

01\24\{1899} (Tuesday)

The weather has been warm and
fair this forenoon, but it rained
this afternoon and harder in the
evening. Worked blasting rocks
this forenoon and putting an{?}
automatic feed on my drilling machin_{machine?}
this afternoon.
{new paragraph?}
Miss Minnie Norton the school
teacher, who is daughter to the late
Rufus Norton of Wolcott{Woolcott!} came and
staid here tonight.

01\25\{1899} (Wednesday) {Date written as 01\24\{1899} (Wednesday)}

During the Night there was a severe thunder{thruder!}
shower. The Lightning{Lightening!} was very sharp
and the thunder very loud and continued
a long{lang!} time

The Church in Prospect was struck and
all shattered so that it is not safe to go
into, some{same!} say that __{text smudged} might just as well
have been burned.

Worked about home blasting rocks most
of the day.

Went to Rogere Bros a little after six
o closk{o ctock!} to see Henry Buckingham about a
job.

Went to the Chapel to the Entertainment
which was furnished by the young ladies
They realized $6.00

01\26\{1899} (Thursday)

Fine day, split{splite?} rocks{word smudged} most of the time
Went to the Grange this evening.
{new paragrapoh?}
Mary paid our yearly dues $4.00
{new paragraph?}
They had a debate, the question was,
Resolved{"!}, that {"!} animals are of more use
to mankind than metal, John Todd,
and Willie Garrigus were on the
affirmative{affermative!} side and Joe Hughey{Hugbey?}
and myself on the negative,
The negative beat by 5 point to two.

01\27\{1899} (Friday)

This morning the weather was fine
but before night it came off cold

Went to Mr. Harry Garrigus and
welded a set of inch and one eight{eighth?}
axles{axlis!} on his carriage.

01\28\{1899} (Saturday)

Went to Mr. Garrigus and worked
till afternoon, then worked on _{a?} pattern
for my drilling machine till six
o clock, when Mr. Worden came and I
went to town with him to see about
getting entertainers fo_{for? faf!} the Chapel{?}
Fair. Went first to Mr. John Lines
to see if we could ges{?} his orchestra{archestra?},
He seemed very willing himself{himsilf!} and
thought that the others would
come, Went next to see Dr. Parry and he told
us of a Mandolin{Mandilin!} club composed of young
la_ies{ladies?} that belonged to his church, that he
would see for us, from thence we went to
Dr. Davdenports, and he told us of the
Lourelli_{Lourellie? Lourellis?} Banjoe{Banjo?} club of young ladies
hich he thought we might get, Then
Went back to Field Street to see Mrs.
Orsgood{?} to see if we could get her
to help get a quartet{quartette!}, but she was
out, so we went to see Dr. Graves who
is Post{?} Surgeon here{word smudged},{,?} to get exempted
from Military tax, but he was not
i_{in?}. So we went to P.B. Nortons
livery stable, were Mr. Worden left
he team and drove home very fast
the horse being a_{an? word smudged} extra fast one.

01\29\{1899} (Sunday)

Went to the Chapel this afternoon
Rev. Dr. Anderson of the first Congregational{?}
Church preach__{preached? word smudged} Weather to day
has been very c___{cold? word smudged},{,?} did not thaw any.

01\30\1899 (Monday)

Very Cold this morning got up at
seven, Went and carried Clyde to
school at the Crosby Grammer
school, and then went to Dr. F.G.
Graves and had him examine me in
regard to Military disability, which
he did, and gave a certificate which
was as follows
Waterbury Conn Jan 30th{?} 1899
To the Selectmen of the Town of Waterbury,
I certify that I have examined
Charles S. Miller. of Waterbury and do hereby{here-by?}
exempt him from Military duty
under standard of disability prescribed
by the Surgeon{Surgean!} General. His disability
is double inguine hernia & deformed
an_le{ankle?} and is permanent.
F G Graves
Post Surgeon New Haven County.
{new paragraph?}
Irving, Margaret, or Ruth, did not go
to school, owing to their teachers going
visiting schools, and Irving and I
ran the washing machine, after which
we repaired George Cass's bugg_{buggy?}, and
then went to my s___{shop?} and brought home a
load of truck from out of the garrett.
{new paragraph?}
After supper Clyde, Irving, Margaret and
Ruth{?} went skating __{on? word smudged} Frosts pont{?}, staid
till 9.30 oclock, Clyde went down to
Fathers to stay tonight.

01\31\{1899} (Tuesday)

Very Cold all day did not thaw, snowed
a little this morning about an inch fell.
{new paragraph?}
Went to see Miles payne this afternoon
and we went and looked over the Thomas
Payne place which they are going to have
fixed up. Saw Wm Purdy about his barn
which he is thinking of having painted.

Very cold this evening.

Miles Paynes paid me 2.00 which pays me
up in full to date

02\01\{1899} (Wednesday)

Weather cold did not thaw about an
inch of snow fell during the night.
{new paragraph?}
Wo_ked{Worked?} about home and drew stuff from
the shop all day. Mary went soliciting
about East Farms for the Chapel Fair.

02\02\{1899} (Thursday) {recprded as 02\03\{1899} (Thursday)!}

Weather to day a little warmer.

Staid about home all the forenoon.

Drew a load of shafting, pulleys, and
iron, from my shop and stored them in
the garrett{garrelt!} and wood house this afternoon

02\03\{1899} (Friday) {recorded as 02\04\{1899} (Friday)!}

Got up at 5.30 Weather warmer so
that it thawed the forenoon, turned
into rain and sleet about noon, this
evening it is a genuine{genuwine!} ice storm as
very slipery{slippery?}.

Went to Henry Buckinghams this
morning got there at 6.30 waited till near
seven and went to Rogers Bros shopo{shops?} to
see James Taben{?} the foreman{formean!} about getting
work, He is to let me know in a few
days whether{wheather!} they want me or not.

Came{Caure!} home, had breakfast after
which Pierpont, Ray and myself went
to my sho_{shop?} and brought home a
load of various articles, this forenoon
{new paragraph?}
Went again this afternoon and swept
out the lower floor, and brought another
load home.

02\04\{1899} (Saturday)

This morning everything was coated with
ice, and it was very slipery{slippery?} so it was
hard to get about, it being not very cold
it thawed so a team that was not very
shar_{sharp?} could be driven about 11 oclock/o'clock{?},
about 9.30{?} Robert Hotchkiss came and
we butchere our cow, which took till
one o clock. He stayed{slayed!} to dinner, which
as boiled cabbage{cabbaeg!}, potatoes, and
cottage pudding, Agnes Able came
while we were at dinn_r{dinner? word smudged}, to have
Irving drive her about the neighborhood{nighborhood/nighbarhood!}
in the bu__y{buggy? word smudged} to solicit{slicit!} for
the coming Chape__{Chapel? word smudged} Fair.

{Note in margin of text:
Ruth & I remember
this.
He told Civil War
stories.}

During the afternoon Clyde and
I went to my shop and finished
sweeping it out __cept{except? word smudged} the Basement{Basment!}
floor{floar!}.

After which I went to visit James
Porter who has not been out for
a month {mark in text or punctuation?} or since his shoulder was
hurt, then went down to see
Father and mother, staid till seven
then home.

Wm Purdy paid me six dollars to day.

02\05\1899 (Sunday)

Snowed quite hard till about 5 o'clock.

Went to the Chapel, M_{Mr.?} Parry preached
there was collected 1.24

From the Chapel Mary and I went
to Mrs. Thaedore Munsons{?} to get information
to have published in the
Waterbury American tomorrow.

Then we stoped at John Franches
to see where I could find Murry
Beeby, as I wanted to get word to him
about the Chapel fair, then to Hiran{?}
Able to see about getting the crash{cash?} to
cover the Chapel carpet, then home.

02\06\{1899} (Monday)

This day the weather has been cloudy{clowdy!} but
rather warm, about 8 o clock to night it began{bgan!}
snowing.

Ran the washing{wahng!} machine for Mary till
9 o clock. Then hitched up old jack into
the business wagon and drove to
the American Office and had
an Advertisement put in the paper
and left a notice to be printed about the{"about the" is smudged}
Chapel fair. From thence went to the
Selectmens Office{?} at the City hall and
had Mr. Perry Morris file a certificat{cirtificate!}
which the Post{Past?} Examining Surgeon had
given me exempting me from Military
tax on{an!} account of disability{disibility!}. Thence
to Chancy Ceeleys{?} Office on South
Willow Street to see about getten{getting?} the
carpet cover for the Chapel, he was not
in but I ws told to go to his house No
85{?} Bishop Street at noon and I would
find him, walked to my team which
was hitched on{an!} South Elm Street, and
then drove through North Elm Street
and up North Main to Ed Holdens{?}
store where I waited to see him when
he came at noon, after 12 o clock h_{he?}
came, and then I drove to Mr. Ceeleys
house, he told me to meet him in
front of D B{?} Wilsons, store on East
Main STreet at quarter past one{ane!},
I was there and he came driving
past very fast, di_{did?} not see me.
I pursued{purseweed!} on foot and caught{cought!}
him at Cannon and Websters{?}
drug store on Bank STreet where he
had stoped, he said that he had
forgotten me, but would be back
to Wilsons store in six minutes,
he was there, and we went up in
Mechanics hall and got the crash
carpet cover, and I brought it home.
After dinner went to Mrs. Munson_{Munsons?}
to get the key to the Chapel, but
she was away, then went{wen!} to Mr.
Harry Garrigus to see about having
Wilkie{Willie?} decorate the Chapel tomorrow{tomarrays!}
evening with his bunting{?} and flags.
{new paragraph?}
Then went to see George Cass at
the Mill Plain Ice Co.{. or ,?} and home
and to supper Mr. Worden called
and told me{?} that another banjo{banjoe!}
club was coming to play at the
Chapel. Mr. Newman is
coming I told him, and he told me
to have him be at 185{?} Grand Street
at 7 o clock Thursday evening to
ride out on the bus.

Went to the Chapel adn Hiran Able{?}
Maruce{Maurice?} Alcott clyde and irving and
Wernon Able put the crash down.

Mr. La Stone and Mr. Maton
rented{?} my wagon shop today{to day?} for
15 dollars per month, to date from
the 15 of Feb.

{Note in margin of text:
Rented
Shope.{. or -?}}

There was a severe battle fought{-?}
at the Phillipines{Phillipenes!} Island Sunday_{?}
it is reported in which {next few words are smudged} our lo__{loss?} is
put at _75{175?} men.

The Government has{hs!} given to the town of
Cornwall one 8 in howitzer and 140 shells to
be placed on or near the grave of Maj Gen
John Sedgwick at Cornwall Hollow{?}.
{new paragraph?}
The Hon T.S. Gold{?}. M H Sedgwick and C L
Gold of Cornwall and Mr. Stoeckel{?} of Norfolk
have charge of the Memorial matter

{Note in margin of text:
Gen
Sedgwicks
Memorial}

02\07\{1899} (Tuesday)

Snowed all day, was up to Chapel
most of the day, also in the evening,
putting up booths etc. for the fair.
Began taking milk of Wilson Pierpont.

{Note in margin of text;
Milk}

02\08\{1899} (Wednesday)

Snowed till about _{5?} O'clock this
afternoon when it cleared off cold.

Went to the Chapel this afternoon
and helped sister Caro, Bertha French
and Agniss{Agnes?} Able put up and trim
their booths for the fair.

Rob Hotchkiss came and cut up
our beef.

02\09\{1899} (Thursday)

The weather to day{to days!} was very Cold
{new paragraph?}
Choped wood{wodd!} this forenoon, and
sent to the Chapel after dinner
and started the fires up, after which
I put _p{up?} the trimmings{trimings!?}, flags,
bunting, evergreens etc.

The fair in the evening was a
success, the attendance{attendence!} large, considering
the weather, had to stay and lock up
aft__{after? text smudged} the rest had gone home and
it was twelve o'clock before I got home.
_{I?} froze one ear in going home,
The{Then?} the thermometer{themometer!} was 12 degrees
below zero when I went to bed.
{new paragraph?}
The Conecticut F______{Farmers? word smudged} Board of
Agriculture
held an Institute meeting at Grange
Hall this day, the attendance was small.

02\10\{1899} (Friday)

The thermometer{themometer!} stood at 12 below zero
this morning at 7 o'clock when I got up
I immediately wrote{:?} the following
notice to be sent to the daily American
to be published this evening

There was a good attendance at the
fair at Mill Plain Chapel last evening,
notwithstanding the cold weather.
{new paragraph?}
The Chapel was handsomely{handsomly!} decorated{decarated!}
with flags bunting and evergreens.
{new paragraph?}
The various booths for the sale of
aprons, fancy work, ice cream, cake,
and other articles were tastefully
arranged and well patronized

The supper was an excellent one,
including chicken, cold meats, cake
etc. The entertainment was a very
pleasing one, of a musical nature,
and the program was as follows,
Selection by Young Ladies Uterpe
club of the first Baptist Church; Piano
solo Miss Conin; mandolin solo, Mr.
Burrett accompanied by Miss Burrett;
song Mr. Newman; mandolin
selection Misses Crnonin, accompanied
by Miss Garrity, and Mr. Derwin{?},
Uterpe Club, "Uncle Sams patrol," all
were warmly applauded and responded
to encores. A good time is promised
to all tonight. Free busses will run
to chapel.

After breakfast of Porterhouse{Parterhouse!} steak
choped fire wood, till noon; after dinner
went to the Chapel and started the fires,
and poped corn till evening ate supper
in the Chapel, there was a goot attendance{word smudged}
although the weather was very cold.
{new paragraph?}
Altogether{Altogather!} the Chapel realised about $105.00
from the fair.

Came home at 12 o'clock the thermometer{themometer!}
standing 10 degrees below zero.

Earnest{Ernest?} Robinson notified the Chapel
committee that he should not carry{cary!}
the ministers from town to the Chapel
after next Sunday.

02\11\1899 (Saturday)

Got up at seven o'clock the weather very
cold 10 below zero, at many places it was
much lower, at Mr. Spen_ers{Spencers? word smudged} it was 18
below{bllow!}
at 8.30 went to the Chapel and at work taking
down the booths and bu-ting{bunting? word smudged} etc,
after{apter!} _{a?, can't read word, is word crossed out?}
little time Cara came, Miss Tatem the school
teacher came a little --ter{later? word smudged}, then Mrs. Munson
and Bertha Franch, _da{Ida?} Spender{?} and
Agness Able came later, Clyde and Wernam
Able carried the goods home with the team,
and we had the Chapel cleaned and things
in place at three oclock.

While I was there yesterday Young Mr.
Kenworthy from Benedict & Burnhams
came to see if I would go there monday to
work forging, in the place of Wallace
Burgess who is sick.

It snowed all day.

02\12\1899 (Sunday)

Very cold all day thermometer{themometer!} was 1 below
this morning, snowed most of the day
this evening it is 4 below,
{new paragraph?}
Went to the Chapel there were 18 person{persons?}
there, Mr. Rafter{?} of Waterville preached.

02\13\1899 (Monday)

When I got up this morning ot quarter
past five it was still snowing and
the thermometer{themometer!} stood at 4 above zero.

Ate breakfast of stewed beef potatoes etc
and Clyde and I started for Benedict
and Burnhams shop, via silver street
and Washington street, got there at 25
minutes to seven, waited till Mr. Kenworthy
came, and he took{tooke!} me to the
machine shop and introduced to a
Mr. Byers who took me to the blacksmith
shop and introduced me to
Mr. Kelly who set{sit?} me at work
first making a lot of scratching
machine tools then{thin?} at various
other repair jobs, at noon went
to Uncle Goldsmiths on Clay Street and
had dinenr of boiled ham, potatoes, turnips,
pie, crullers{?}, and coffee, at six o'clock
found Clyde and Irving waiting for me
at the corner of Washington Street with
the horse sled.{;!} It had snowed hard all day
and when we came to start home it
snowed so hard and the wind blew se{so?}
that we could not see, owing to the snow
plastering ou{on?} our faces so that we
could not see through it.

{Note in margin of text:
Went to
Work at
Benedict
& Burnhams{Birnhams!}

We could not drive anythere{anywhere?} only
in the car tracks as the snow was so
deep on the sides of the road.
{new paragraph?}
On the who-le{whole? word smudged} it was the
worst storm I have seen since the
great storm of 1888.

02\14\{1899} (Tuesday)

This morning the snow lay on the
ground about two and one half feet deep.

Temperature{Tempature!} 6 above zero.

Expected to go to work on the trolley
cars and drove to the end of the
at Silver Street, having to break
our own path as it had drifted much
during the night, but the cars were
not running nor did they get ru__ing{running? word difficult to read}
till about 4 O clock P.M.

Returned home and went ot work
breaking out the Doblitte{Doolittle?} road with
the help of Mr. Andrews who helped
4 hr Mr. Able who worked 4 hr, Mr. Garrigus
2{?}, Clyd{Clyde?} 5 hr and Myself 5 hr some of it
we had{?} to dig out 5 times as the high
win_{wind?} filled it up.
at noon, went to the trolley line to go to
the shop, but the cars were not running{word hard to read}

02\15\{1899} (Wednesday)

I never kew of but one morning
that was as cold as this, the thermometer{themometer!}
went down to 24 degrees
below zero, but the weather has
been warmer during the day
than it has been before for
several days. Expected to take
the cars at Silver STreet to go to the
shop but they were not running so
I walked.

Sm Purdy Paid Clyde 4.00 which he
Clyde went after, he also got my tool
chest at Miles Paynes.

02\16\1899 (Thursday)

Got up a little after 5 o'clock, went to
the end of the Trolley track on the
pung{?} with Clyde but the car had
just left so I stayed on the sled to
Spensers store where Clyde was
going after fe_d{feed?}, then walked ___{the?}
rest of the way.

Worked at forging all day, ate my
dinner in the shop.

Came home on the trolley cars
there was a great crowd on the cars
and the conductor did not collect
my fare. Came ____{ucor?} getting stuck
several times on account of the
snow and ice on the track.

Sister Iva got on at the corner of
Mill Street, when we got to the
end of the line at Silver street we
found Clyde waiting with the
sleigh and we rode home.

Mary went tot eh Grange, this
evening. Wrote to Hon T S Gold{?} about attending
the dedication of Gen Sedgwicks memorial dedication at Cornwall{?}.

02\17\1899 (Friday)

Drove to work this morning via Silver
street and Washington.

Weather a little foggy. Worked forging
all day. Clyde met me on Washington
Street and we drove home, it
being very bad traveling{troveling!} on account
of the snow drifts.

02\18\{1899} (Satruday)

Weather this morning{,?} was warm
and nice, Clyd{Clyde?} drove the horse to
carry{cary!} me to work. Mr. Kenworthy
told me to day that they would give
me three dollars a day as that was
what I asked, I think it very good pay
for a new beginner in a new place.

The factory closed at 5.30 and I started
up Washington street to meet Clyde

I was obliged to walk very slow on account
of being very lame, met Clyde at
the corner of Baldwing{Boldwin!} street, and we
went to Irving black on East main street
and left the crash which we had to cover
the carpet at the Chapel fair.
{new paragraph?}
Then went to Hemingways fish market
and Clyde bought 1 quart of oysters
and three pounds of oyster crackers,
From thence to heaters adn bought
4 lbs soda cracks at 8 cts per pound,
then home, and very wet, it raining
hard all of the time.

02\19\{1899} (Sunday)

Got up this morning at 8 o'clock put two
spokes in my buggy wheel, at_{ate?} breakfast
of stewed oysters, after which I went
to East Farms{Farmes!} to see Mr. Warden about
meeting the minsiter at the end of the
trolley line, from thence I went to mr.
Burgers at Gilletts corner in Prospect, but
he had gone to Cheshire to see Dr. meyers
so came home. Got ready and went to
the Chapel and heard Mr. Howell preach
there was collected 1.41

The weather to day has been very warm
the snow has melted and softened.

02\20\{1899} (Monday)

The weather this day has been fine.

Went to the shop and worked very hard all day
This evening went to see mr. Edwin Welton who
holds a mortgage{morgage!} of 870.00{?} dollars with{winth!}
interest{-?}
that amounts to over 1000.00 altogether{altogather?}, agreed
to pay him the rent money, then went to
see Mr. J. G. Janes{Jmaes?} about insuring it, He will
insure{inshure?} it got 1000.00 for a premuim of 27.50{?}
Came home very hungry and tired.

02\21\{1899} (Tuesday)

Got up at 20 minutes past five, the boys and
I got the barn chores before six, had breakfast
and got started for the shop at 6.15 went
down the old Cheshire road to Silver Street
through Silver Street to Dublin, out Dublin
to Washington through Washington to
South Mains{?} where I go_{got?} out of the sleigh
and irving drove home, _nd{and?} I went into
the shop after leaving my check at the
gate my check is __mber{number? word smudged} 830

The first work I did was to dress over
some scratchers, for the overalling{?} machines,
then dress over 36 hand scratchers
Then temper 60 machine scratchers,
then make and temper a number of
machinists{machinests!} tools, then repair two
punch bars for the casting,
then hardened some hand scratchersand up a muffle rod for the
Seamless{?}
tube shop.

Came home at six, had supper and
went to see Robert Hotchkiss about salting{solting!}
down our beef, then ____{home?} and wrote.

02\22\{1899} (Wednesday)

Weather fine and warm snow softened
to the bottom and troveling{?} very hard.

Went tot eh shop worked all day
after six went to Mr. Edwin Welton
on L__iden{Leriden?} Street about Insuring my
shop over and about paying the interest
{new paragraph?}
Carried him the Incurance policies{pollicies!}
One of 500.00 on the New Hampshire Company
and one of 500.00 on the _____ _____
Co.

Came hgome and Clyde and I ate supper
together{togather!} a_{as?} the rest of the folks have{word hard to
read}
gone the the {written twice} Chaptel supper.

This is Washingtons birthday, is has
been observed by the schools closing, and
the flying of flags about the City and
many of the public business places
closed.

02\23\{1899} (Thursday)

The weather to day has been very
warm, Worked at Benedict and
Buyrnhams, ten hours, went to
the grange this evening.

02\24\{1899} (Friday)

The weather to day has been a little
cooler, Worked at Benedict _{&?} Burnhams.

02\25\{1899} (Saturday)

The weather to day has been cold the
mercury was 2 above zero, at 6.30 this
morning.

Worked till{tuill!} 5.30 at Benedict and Burnhams.

02\26\{1899} (Sunday)

Got up this morning at 8 o'clock went
to my shop at 9 to meet Mr. Larocque{?}
and Mr. Edide Maston{?} but they
were not there, so went down to
Fathers and had breakfast after which
Mr. Peter R. Larocque{?} came after me
and we went up to the shop and they
bought a lot of plank which came to
11.60 a lot of Wheels 12.00 and a wagon for
4.00, all came to 27.60 also 8 sets of tires
at 1 1/4 cts, they are to pay for it later,
Came home and got ready and went
to Fathers adn got his horse and
carriage and went to the trolley,
and met the Rev. Dr. Davenport{?} and carried
him to the Chapel, where he preached to an
audience of 47 persons it being very stormy
with sleet and rain.

Took the team home and staid at Fathers
till supper was over, and came home, getting
very wet.

02\27\{1899} (Monday)

Got up a little past five o'clock had
breakfast at six and started for work
at twenty minutes past, got to the
shop at at {written twice} 10 minutes to seven, it
rained all of the way.

The water in the Naugatuck river
has been quite high to day and lots of
ice has come{came!} down.

Pierpont took the horse down to
the shop and had it shod,
Clyde came after me tonight.

02\28\{1899} (Tuesday)

This morning the weather was clear
and cool. Went to the shop at the usual
time and worked all day

Received{Recived!} my pay for last weeks
work which amounted to eighteen
dollars, Clyde came after met at
six and we went to see mr. J G Janes{James?}
and paid him the b_lance{balance?} on the
insurance on my shop except fifty
cents which I am to send to him
tomorrow by Clyde, then __{we?} went
to M.J Loggs{?} store and bought a
bag of flower{flour!}, for which we paid
60 cts, then started home.

While coming down Cherry street
we heard the fire alarm bell strike
after which the alarm whistle blew
soon a hack came along the horses
__{on?} a dead run, then _ame{same?} a hose
wagon and we __pt{kept?} along with it
till we came to Tracys black{block?} which
was on fire, we drove up Williams street
and hitched the horse,{or;?} and went through
the back yards __{to?} the rear of the
block, where we had a fine view of
the fire, they had two streams of
water on the East side of it and
two inside, there was one Steamer,
two hose wagons, one hose cart,{or .?} and
a large hook and ladder truck, soon
they had the fire under control, and
we came home.

This is the last day of the month, and
it bids{?} fair to storm tomorrow.

03\01\1899 (Wednesday)

This first day of march has been very
pleasant{plesant!} and warm. Worked all day at
Benedict and Burnhams, Clyd{Clyde?} came
after me this evening with the team,
and we drove home.

George Alexander brought a load of
wood to day

This evening Clyde, Irving, Margaret
and Ruth went to the Chapel
to rehearse{reharse!} for an entertainment
which the young Ladies are to give

03\02\{1899} (Thursday)

The weather to day has been warm
and the snow disappeared very much.
{new paragraph?}
Worked at Benedict _{&?} Burnhams.
{new paragraph?}
This evening Mary and I went to
see Hiram Able to make arrangements
for Young mens Night
at the Chapel, and also to tell him
of his appointment{apointment!} as janitor of
the Chapel.

The Rev. Mr. Holden gave a Stereopitan{?}
entertainment at the Grange
this evening, for which they charged
an admission of 10cts.{. or ,?} The Lecture
was entitled Hawaii.

03\03\{1899} (Friday)

Went to the shop as usual to day
{new paragraph?}
Spent the evening at home and
went to bed at 10 o'clock.

{03\04\1899} (Saturday) {Only "Saturday" was written in the margin
to label the entry}

The weather{wather!} to day has been wet
and the traveling very muddy
{new paragraph}
Charlie Cass went to New York
to St. Lukes hospital{hastital/hostital!} to have a
surgical{sergical!} operation performed{preformed!} in the
shape of removing apendicitis{a pendicitas!}.
His wife Trace accompanied him

We the children and the Ables,
Frenches, Beckwith's, Spenders, and
several others went to the Chapel
to rehearse{reherse!} for an entertainment to
be{he!} given some future time.

03\05\1899 (Sunday)

Did not get up till 9 o'clock, as it was raining
very hard. Spent most of the forenoon read___{reading? ready?}
writing etc. Went this afternoon and saw{sow!}
Morris{Marris!} Burger at Gillettes corners, found
him very sick with inflamation{inflanation!} of the bladder,
He thought that he would be able to
go to work in two or three weeks.
{new paragraph?}
Dr. Parry{?} preached at the Chapel to day

03\06\{1899} (Monday)

Worked at Benedict and Burnhams, 10
hours

03\07\{1899} (Tuesday)

The weather to day has been very
stormy, showed{showered?} hard.

Clyd{Clyde?} Irving, Margaret, and Ruth,
went to the Chapel to rehearse{reherse!} to{lo!}
night but there was no one there.

03\08\{1899} (Wednesday)

Weather to day was cold and
fair. The Ladies Union had a
supper and Entertainment at
the Chapel this evening at which
they cleared something over $7.00

03\09\{1899} (Thursday)

The weather overhead has been
fine to day, but I have not been
up there, on the ground it was
spashy{splashy? slushy?}. Mary has gone to the
Grange. Clyde told me that Thomas
Melbourn has moved to Beacon Falls
and left his place, which is now for sale.

03\10\1899 (Friday)

Worked to day at Benedict and Burnhams,
blacksmithing.

Bought a barrel{barrell!} of flour{flower!} off{of!} Thomas
Kelley for 4.50 to day.

Have worked very hard to day and
as I am not accustomed{accostomed!} to tool-making
and factory blacksmithing, and the
others who I work with take care not
to give me much information in
regard to the work and my health is
not very good, I am weary and tired
tonight.

03\11\{1899} (Saturday)

This evening I went to the Chapel
at the request of Bertha French who
has charge of the entertainment
which is to be given next Tuesday
evening,{,?} (but who is now very sick
in bed), to help preserve order.

03\12\{1899} (Sunday)

Did not get up very early this morning{norning!}.
The weather has been warm
and it has thawed, but very little
snow is left, sent Irving to have
George Cass and Charlie Hotchkiss come
and get ready for the part they were
to take in the Entertainment at the
Chapel Tuesday evening
{new paragraph?}
Charlie Cass had an operation performed{preformed!}
in the shape of his appendicitis{appendicitas!} being
taken out, at St. Lukes Hospital at
New York City.

Went to the Chapel{Chapl!} this afternoon,{or . ?}
But there was no service as the miniter
was not met at the Trolley car.

After Chapel went and saw John
FRench about the Chapel supper which
is to be given next week.

03\13\{1899} (Monday)

The weather to day has been fine, the
pleasantest{plesantest!} this year,{,?} so far. Went to
the shop and worked all day.
{new paragraph?}
Received{Recived!} a letter this evening from
Mr. Tucker who is in New Boston{?}
Mass, which was sent to him from
Gross, Hyde & Shipman, attorneys
at law of hartford, which stated
that they were going to have the
Iinsurance{insurance?} case of the old shear
shop assigned in the Waterbury
Superior Court{Cort!} on the week of the
22nd of this month.

There was a bad smash on the
Highland division of the Consolidated
Rail Road this side of
Towantic{?} station yesterday{ysterday!} morning
in which two men were
killed and several injured,{, or .?} Two
freight trains ran into each
other head on on {written twice? an?} the top of a
80 ft embankment, and many
of the cars rolled __wn{down?} to th_{the?}
foot, and scattered the fr__gh{freight?} about.
The Rail Road{Roaod!} Co hired all
of the Farmers about there to hall{haul!}
the greight back a distance of tow{two?}
miles to a place where it could be
loaded on the cars again.

03\14\{1899} (Tuesday)

The weather today has been very nice
but the mud is deep in some{?} places.

At the factory yesterday we were
told that Maurice Burger was coming
to work next week, it was understood
that I was {text is smudged?} to get through
when he came; ___{text smudged} yesterday I was
told that they wanted me to stay
longer, and they were going to
have three Blacksmiths, i.e.
Charlie Kellie, Maurice Burger, and
myself.

Received{Recived!} my pay at the shop to
day which amounted to $18.00 for last
week

Went to the Chapel this evening
to the Entertainment which was
given by the young ladies, it
was a success every was although
the attendance was not large.

{Note in margin of text:
Chapel}

03\15\1899 (Wednesday)

The weather to day has been stormy
most of the time, rain, hail, and sleet.
{new paragraph?}
Miss Minnie Norton the school teacher
came here{hear? word smudged} and staid over night.

03\16\1899 (Thursday)

The weather to day has been rather
cool, and the traveling muddy.

Went to the Grange this evening, but
was so sleepy that I did not enjoy it
very much.

03\17\{1899} (Friday)

The weather to day has been cold
and the roads very rought.

A school meeting is called in this
Saw Mill Plain district for to
night to take some action against
consolidating all of the school
districts in the town.

I did not attend as I am very
tired and am in need of sleep

To day is St. Patricks day and
is ovserved by the Irish many
of whom work at the factory where
I do, they each wear a sprig of gre__{green?}
or some other green emblem, but they
do not know who St. Patrick{Patric!} was only
that he was a great man who drove
all the reptiles from Ireland.

03\18\1899 (Saturday)

The weather has been very stormy,
Sleet, and rain.

This evening Clyde, Irving, Charlie
Hotchkiss and myself{-?} went to Mr.
Thoedor Munsons{?} and got a cook
stove and put it in the cellar of
the Chapel to __{be?} used at the supper
to be given next{?} Wednesday evening,
{new paragraph?}
It rained very h___{hard?} and we did not
get home till 9.30 o clock.

03\19\{1899} (Sunday)

Mr. Bassett preached at Mill
plain Chapel this afternoon.

03\20\{1899} (Monday)

Worked to day at Benedict and
Burnhams.

This evening Charlie Hotchkiss, Clyde
and I went to mrs. Munsons and
got her stove and put it up in the
Chapel cellar{cellear!}, to be used next
Wednesday evening.

03\21\1899 (Tuesday)

When I cam home from the shope
this evening, we Clyde and I; went
round by Mill Plain and finished{f_nisshed!}
setting up the stove in teh Chapel.

After which we came home __d{and?}
after supper, Charlie Hotchkiss and
George Cass came and we choped
hask{?} for the supper at the Chapel
tomorrow evening.

A Letter came tonight from
Gross Hyde and Shipman{?}, Attorneys
in hartford notifying me to
appear at the Superior court{cort!} to
morrow{tommorrow?} morning at 10' o'clock{o clock?} as
a witness at the trial of the{thi?}
Orient Insurance Co against
Barnard _{&?} Saw.

03\22\{1899} (Wednesday)

This morning I went to the shop
and shou_d{showed?} Mr. Byers{.?} the letter
which I received{recived!} from _ross{Gross?}, Hyde
and Shipman, and he told me
that I could stay out, I came home
and got ready and Irving drove
the horse{.?} and carried C_yde{Clyde?} and
I _own{down?} to Fathers and from there
we walked in e rain to the trolley
car and went{wen!} to the center, I went
an{and?} bought{baught!} a pair of rubbers for
which I paid 60 cts then went and
had my _air{hair?} cut and shaved for
which I paid .35 cts then to the
Court{Cort!} house and the trial{tryal!} commenced{comenced!}
I staid all day, and as they
did not hear from Mr. Brainard,
Mr. Hyde wanted me to go to
Southington{Southingston?} and find him, Mr.
Friller{?} gave me $10.00 and told me
get him, I found Will Gillette and he
said that he would go with me. We
came out on the trolley car, and I went
to the Chapel and got my supper, and
Will went to Father's and got his, he
then called for me at the Chapel and
we started for Southington with Father{Father's?}
horse. First we went to Henry Newell{Newells?}
in Marion and he told us that
Wall Dickerman could tell us where
we could find Mr. Brainard, we
stopped at Wall Dickermans and
he told u_{us?} that we would find him
at South end. We then went there and
found that he is living with a
Family named Ruande{?} on Elm{Elim?}
Stree{Street?} in Meriden We then drove
to to {written twice} Stillmans corner and Will
took the trolley there and I kept
on towards Meriden with the
team,{,/} with the horse on a walk,
Will reached Meriden and found
Mr. Brainard and summonds
him to appear in court{cort!} in the
morning, he then started back on
the trolley and met me on West
Main Stree{Street!} in Meriden, we then
started for home w_ich{which?} we reached
at 2 o'clock A.M. wet and cold
it having rain__{rained?} most of the
way. The ground was covered
with three inches of ice snow
and at the to_{top?} of the Southington
Mountain the trees{treees!} were laying,
across the road broken and bent
down with the weight of ice on
them.

03\23\{1899} (Thursday)

Did not get up this morning till
eight o'clock,{, or ;} took the measurements
of many of the timbers and lumber
that was in the Old Shear Shop
which was destroyed by fire on
the evening of Oct _9{19?} 1896, and
which timbers{?} and burnt stuff
are now in my possession.

Had breakfast adn started for town
at quarter to nine, stopped at my
shop and left a lease of the premises
to Mr. Laroque and Mayton for
five years, the Lease was
dated
Feb 15th 1899 and expires Feb 15
1904. Then went and took the trolley
car at Wilver Street, after reaching
town went to Jones and Morgan{?}
and bought an umbrella of cousin
Charlie Phillips for which I paid
$1.18 then went to the Court{Cort!} House
on Lenenworth Street which I
reached at 10 O'clock, at which time
the court{cort!} opened Mr. George E Judd
was the first witness. He was
followed I think by Mr. Henry. C.{?}
Robinson of New York, who in
turn gave his place to Han{Hon?} Frederick
Kingsbury, then Mr. Thomas Porter
of New York was called, then
Mr. Robinson was recalled{recolled!}, after
which it was dinner time and
Mr. Tucker, Mr. Brainard, and myself
went to the Franklin House and had
dinner, after which we returned to
the court and during the afternoon
the testimony of Mr. Tracy and
Mr. Robinson was taken, after which
the court{cort!} adjourned{ajourned!} at 5 o'clock till next
Thursday at 10 o'clock.

Mr. Shipman gave me the plans and
elevations of the old shear shop and I took
them to Mr. Watson Hurlburt and ___t{left?}
them there for him to figure an estimate
of whate a building like the old one
would cost.

03\24\{1899} (Friday)

This morning went to work at Benedict
and Burnhams. Mr. Burger
whose{whoes!} place I am filling called to day
and said that he __{is?} coming to work
next monday.

03\25\{1899} (Saturday)

The weather this morning was very
nice, but it soone clouded{clowded!} in and{,?}
tonight it began snowing.

Charlie Hotchkiss, Clyde, Irving,
Frank, and myself went to the Chape{Chapel?}
and took down Mrs. Munsons stove
and carried it home and set it up.
{new paragraph?}
Came home and ate supper after
which Mary and I went to see
Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, about the
children, whom they say are troubeling
their children, and who mr.
Andrews has complained to the humane
society.

03\26\{1899} (Sunday)

Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
{new paragraph?}
Mr. Davenport preached, I took Fathers
team and met him at the trolley car
and carried him to the Chapell{Chapll!} and
after service home.

Mr. Frederick Upson{?} of Woodtick, died
to day.

03\27\{1899} (Monday)

Weather to day has been cool and
traveling very muddy.

Worked at Benedicts _(&?} Burnhams on
an other fire, as Mr. Burger came
back to work.

This evening Mr. Hoggett{?} called
and left a petition a_ainst{against?} consolidating{consolodating!}
all of the school districts
in the town, for me to sign and
deliver to Wilson Pierpont to be
given to Milan Northrop.

Mr. Andrews borrowed my horse
sled this evening.

Mr. Coleman called on me to
night with a friend and hinted
that he would _ike{like?} to stay over
night, but it was not very convenient
to kee{keep?} him, he at one
time lived on the Old Prospect
road, but now lives in Northborupton{?}
Mass.

03\28\1899 (Tuesday)

It has rained almost all day and to
night the wind blows hard. Received{Recived!} my
Pay at Benedict & Burnhams $12.00 for 4 days

03\29\{1899} (Wednesday)

Rained very hard last night. The
Naugatuck river has been rising all day.
{new paragraph?}
Worked at Benedict and Burnhams,
Mr. Byers told me that they would like
me to stay and work next week.

03\30\{1899} (Thursday)

This morning I took the trolley car
and went to see Mr. Hurlburt at
Mattatuck Street, aabout the estimate
of the cost of the "Old Shear Shop." {. or ,?}
he said that it would cost 10,500{?}
dollars without the foundations,
Mr. Tracy said it would cost $13,000
with foundation, Mr. Green Daolittle{Doolittle?}
told me that he drew the check that
paid for it, and it was {.?}$12,000 in
1873.

Went to the Courthouse{Cort-house! 1 word?} at 10 o'clock
and the case of Barnard Son & Co,
via{nia?} Orient Insurance Co was called
{new paragraph?}
The first witness was George W
Tucker, next myself, and then
Fred Brainard of Meriden,
the case was adjourned{ajourned!} at 2.30 to meet
again at Winsted nest week Monday
to hear the arguments and to finish.

I ws{was?} then asked to go to the Scoville
House with Mr. Shipman and Hyde
will they settled{settlede!} with me, they gave
me $10.00, with the $5.00 they gave me
for going to Meriden, and the $10.00 they
gave me in Winsted makes $25.00 in
all they paid me.

03\31\1899 (Friday)

This day is Fast day, nearly all of
the factories are closed.

Got up at seven o'clock and worked
about home{house?} all day.

The weather has been fine.

Two of the Worden boys came and
they an my children played hide and
seek and yards-off.

Brother Frank called this afternoon.

This evening the woods on{an?} long hill
and the Abrigador, were on fire.

04\01\1899 (Saturday)

This is all fools day, and the children
have{.?} enjoyed it in fooling every-body
that they could.

Worked at Benedict and Burnhams

Mr. Kenworthy told me that they would
like me to stay on eweek longer.

04\02\{1899} (Sunday)

Rev. Mr. Parry preached at the
Chapel to day.

04\03\{1899} (Monday)

Worked all day at Benedict &
Burnhams. Am not feeling
well

04\04\{1899} (Tuesday)

Mr. Andrews moved from
the Jessie Doolittle place to
Tom Melbourns place.

04\05\{1899 (Wednesday)

Am Feeling somewhat better.
The ladies Union had a supper
at the Chapel this evening, Mary
went, but I stayed home.

04\06\{1899} (Thursday)

Mary and several of the Children
went to the Grange hall this evening
to an stereptean{?} exhibition on birds given by
the Grange Lecturer.

04\07\{1899} (Friday)

Worked at Benedict & Burnhams,
Maurice Burger; did not feel well
It is raining very hard this evening.

04\08\{1899} (Saturday)

The Naugatuck River was midling
high to day owing{awing!} to last nights
rain. Large quantities of drift
wood has{have?} floated down, besides
many barrels{barrells!}, boxes, etc.

04\09\{1899} (Sunday)

To day went to Fathers and got his
team and went to the trolley car
and met Dr. Anderson and carried
him to the Chapel where he preached

This evening George Edwards
and wife and hatty called.

Wrote a letter to major Tucker New
Boston Mass, One to Malachi
Gillette, South Norfolk, Conn{Carm.!}
and one to Fred J Woods.

04\10\{1899} (Monday)

This day I worked at Benedict & Burnhams
{new paragraph?}
Irving carried me down, and came
after me at night

Benedict and Burnhams require four
large engines to drive its machinery
{new paragraph?}
They also have eight small engines
located in different parts of the
concern{?} to use when the large engines
are not running.

They keep fourteen horses in the
barn, six of which they use on
double teams, the rest{next? word hard to read} single,
also they have a locomotive{lacomotive! lacomative!} which
is in constant use.

The different departments are.
The Office department
" Mill "
" Seamless Tube "
" Braised "
" City
" Heat Steam & Light "
" Wire Mill
" Shipping "
" Yard "
" Barn "

04\11\{1899} (Tuesday)

The weather to day has been fine,
the grass is turning green, and
robins are singing in the trees

04\12\{1899} (Wednesday)

This evening our family met
at Fathers{Fatheres?} it being his 69 birthday
we were all there except Clyde who
was in Ansonia{?}, and Fred and wife

04\13\1899 (Thursday)

This has been the finest day of the
season so far, but I have been inside
of the Blacksmith shop all day
from seven this morning till six
tonight, except about 10 minutes this
noon,{, or .?} Clyde returned home from
Ansonia where he went yesterday
morning on a visit to Cousin Emma
Drews{?}.

Two months ago to day I went to work
at Benedict and Burnhams, but ex
pect{expect?} that they will not want me after
next Saturday night.

04\14\{1899} (Friday)

The weather to day has been nice
and spring-like.

This evening Miles Panne{Paune? Payne?} called
and wanted me to go to work
for him next week, if Benedicts, Charlie Hotchkiss and
Howard Neil called to practice{practise!}
drumming soon George Cass
came and, we marched to Charlie
Cass at M rjor Tuckers place, going
up by way of the Mattatuck shop, and
coming back by Hyrams Ables.

04\15\1899 (Saturday)

The weather to day has been fine.

Mr. Byers came to me at the
shop and said that they would
like me to stay another week
and work for them, I said that
I would stay.

Last night Thomas Miles
Payne wished that I could
come{came!} to work for him.

Mr. Lo Rogue{?} paid me 15.00 one
months rent Which was due on my shop.

I called to night to see Mr.
Fred Woods about settling{settleing!} an old
account, but he was not in.{"?}

I told the bookkeeper that {-?} I
would call again next monday evening

04\16\{1899} (Sunday)

I got up at about seven o'clock
and worked about the yard for
a while this morning. It commenced{?}
to rain at about 7.45 and rained
harder and harder till afternoon
when it began snowing, and
continued till night.

Clyde has been in bed sick
all day.

Some of the children went to
the Chapel this afternoon to
_undayschool{Sundayschool? Text is smudged}.

Mr. Hannan preached ruing
the service.

In the Evening Mrs. Thoedore{Thoedare!}
Munson and Agness Able{?} called
to see Mary about the next
supper.

{04\17\1899} (Monday) {Only "Monday" is written to label this
entry}

Worked to day at Benedict & Burnhams.
The weather to day has been
fine. It is reported that Charlie
Monroe{?} and Mrs. Stark are married

04\18\{1899} (Tuesday)

The weather to day has{word smudged?} been warm{warn!} and
spring-like.

Maurice Berger has been sick and did
not work yesterday or today{1 word?}.

04\19\{1899} (Wednesday)

The weather to day has been clear and
warm although it looks like storm
this evening{evenining!}.

There was a dwelling house burned
in South Brooklyn this afternoon
{new paragraph?}
I saw from the shop the Steamer
and hose wagon also the Hook and
Ladder truck as they crossed the
Bank Street bridge.

This evening I went to the Chapel
toe the Supper and Entertainment
given by the ladies Union, which
is the last supper to be giv_{given?} this
_eason{season?}.

04\20\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked at B and B to day. Went to
the Grange this evening.

04\21\{1899} (Friday)

This morning I got up at 20 minutes
past 5,o'clock, went to work at seven,
{new paragraph?}
Worked till twelve, ate my dinner in
the shop, and at one went to work,
and worked till six.

The weather was wet this forenoon, but
it cleared up this afternoon.

This evening George Cass, Charlie
Hotchkiss, Howard Neil, Henry
Buyckinghan{?}, and a man that I
did not know came to d_____{dinner?}.

04\22\{1899} (Saturday)

Elmer Pierponts wife died this
afternoon, aged 38 years.

The weather to day has been
nice and warm.

04\23{24!}\{1899} (Sunday)

The weather to day has been warm
and nice. Mr. Davenport preached
at the Chapel,{, or .?} I carried him home
with Fathers horse.

04\24{25!}\{1899} (Monday)

The weather has been clear but
rather cool to day.

Maurice Berger has been to work
to day.

04\25{26!}\{1899} (Tuesday)

To day the weather has been warm
and the roads very dusty.

Went to the shop and worked till
noon, Irving met me at the corner
of Washington STreet at 12 o clock and
brought me home, I ate dinner and
got ready soon as possible, and
Wilson Pierpont came and hitched
into my two seated wagon{wagan!} and we
went to Elmer Pierpotns house on
Hospital{Haspital!} avenue to attend the
funeral of his wife Lizzie who
died last Saturday afternoon

Mr. Hannah, Methodist minsiter
attended, and the Pall bearers were
Wilson Pierpont, __stin{Austin?}, and
Charlie Pierpont and myself.
{new paragraph?}
They buried her in the Pine
Grove Cemetery at Mill Plain

In the evening Clyde and
I went to the town clerks office
to look the records in regard
to Capt Phinias/Phileas{?} Castle who
was an early settler at Hagpound{?}{,?}
(East Farms)

04\26\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked at Benedict and Burnhams
to day.

Saw some boys in swimming
in the Naugatuck River.

04\27\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked at B and B, William
Shanahan was out sick, he helped
Maurice Burger, and helped me
when Burger was out sick.

04\28\{1899} (Friday)

There was a severe frost this
morning and it was cold, worked
at Benedict and Burnhams, Mr.
Byers told me that the work is
caught up and that they would
not need me after tomorrow night
{new paragraph?}
But would like to have me
come again when they are busy.
Charlie Cass and his wife Tracy has{have?} move{moved?}
from Mr. Tuckers, __{to? is this word crossed out?} the Doolittle place

04\29\1899 (Saturday)

Got through working at Benedict
and Burnhams to night.

04\30\1899 (Sunday)

I went to day to Dr. Andersons{?} at
No 144 Prospect Street _t{at?} half past two
and carriee him to the{?} Mill Plain
Chapel where he preached.
{new paragraph?}
The attendance{attendence!} was rather small.

I heard tonight that William B{?}
Pratt whose{whoes!} home was formly{formerly?} on
East Mountain was drowned in
Plymoth{?} last night while fishing
He worked for me in 1892 at wagon
woodworking.

05\01\{1899} (Monday)

Went to work to day for Thomas
M Payne on East Mountain.

Made a heavy cart wheel with
2 1/2 spoke.

This Evening Clydye and I plowed
the East{Eeast!} garden

There has{have?} been two alarms{arlarms!} of
fire to day, one a little{two words?} before Seven
this morning from the corner
of Washington and South Main
Streets, and one from the corner
of Meadow and Bank Streets
a little after 12 this noon.

It is noining{raining?} now quite a little
and thundering and lightening a
good deal 9 o'clock P.M.

Margarett{Margaret?}, Ruth and Irving
went about the neightborhood this
evening hanging May baskets{basketts! baskett! test difficult to read}
an/on{?}
the doors, but it came an{on?} to blow
and rain so hard that they lost{last?}
many of the flowers out of the
baskets and then they came home{hoine?}

05\02\{1899} (Tuesday)

This morning I went to work for
Thomas Mils Payne, on East
Mountain. This forenoon William{?}
Purdy, and his wife, who was Jemie{? text difficult to read}
Pratt, and Miss Libie Pratt,
and Miles Payne and wife went
Thomaston to attend the funeral
of William{Willian!} Pratt who was drowned
last Saturday night.

I was left alone in the shop the
rest of the day.

05\03\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked for Miles Payne to day.

Plowed the North garden this morning
and tonight.

Bought of an agent, one Niagra,
one Vergeunes{?} and one Warden
grape vine for which I paid .50 cts

05\04\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked for Miles Payne to day.

Had Blyde go to Benedict &{?} Burnhams
and get my pay $16.50

Went to the Grange tonight{1 word? text smudged?}.

05\05\1899{Friday)

Worked to day for T Miles Payne{?},
on East Mountain, Repairing wagons
{new paragraph?}
Maurice Burgher{?} left word that
they wanted me to come and work
at Benedict and Burnhams, to
morrow.

05\06\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked for{fa!} Mr. Payne to day he
paid me what he owed me 13.25

This evening Mary and I went
to George Canners{Conners?} on West Side hild{hill?}
to the celebration of their silver
wedding.

05\07\{1899} (Sunday)

Mr. Parry preached at the Chapel
this afternoon.

Went to Cheshire this afternoon
with Mr. Tucker{?}.

05\08\{1899} (Monday)

Went to work at Benedict & Burnhams
to day.

Mr. Burger was out sick.

05\09\{1899} (Tuesday)

Worked at Benedict and Burnhams

05\10\1899 (Wednesday)

Worked at Benedict and Burnhams
This evening Clyde, Irving, Mary
and Myself went out to East Farms
to Arthur Pierponts to a dance
in an addit__n{addition?} which he has
built on to his South cow barn
30 x 40 ft There were about 75
present and all had a nice time.

05\11\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked as usual to day, This
evening Mary and I attended
the Grange.

05\12\1899 (Friday)

I worked to day at Benedict & Burnham_{Burnhams?}
Brother Frank and Grissy his wife,
William Gillette, and sister Iva started
for North Goshen this morning to visit
Cousin Malchi Gillette.

The weather has been fine and clear.

05\13\{1899} (Saturday)

The weather to day has been cloudy{?}
in the forenoon and rained this
afternoon, I worked at B. & B.

05\14\{1899} (Sunday)

Clyde, Irving, Pierpont, Raymond,
and myself went this morning out on
the Southington mountain
{new paragraph?}
Staid home the rest of the day.

Mr. Rafter of Waterville preached at
the Chapel.

05\15\{1899} (Monday)

The weather to day has been very
cool.{.?} I worked at Benedict & Burnhams{?}.

05\16\1899 (Tuesday)

Got up this morning at 2_{20?} minutes past
5 had breakfast and Irving drove the horse
and we rode to the trolley car, which I
took and went to Benedict and Burnhams,{,?}
where I worked all day. Rode{Wrode!} home to
night with maurice Burgher{?}.

There has{have?} been two poliecemen!} appointed
(Hickey and Brinkel) to ride on
Bicycles{Bicicles!} to arrest scorchers{?} or fast
riders who violate the law, which
says that they must ride faster than
ten miles an hour, within the City
limits. They have arrested seven
to day, but let then{them?} out on a bail of $50.00

05\17\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked at Benedict & Burnhams to
ay. Last{Least?} night at about 8.30 I
heard a noise that sounded like
thunder under ground, I did not
think much of it at the time, but
I learn__{learned? word smudged} to day that it was an
earthquake and was heard and felt
in all of the towns about here, and
along the Connecticut River, I{It?} was felt{?}
in Hartford, Middletown, East Hampton,
and as far South as Saybrook.

The shock was so severe that it
caused the dishes to rattle on the shelves
in some houses, in Bristol it shook
the plaster off from the ceilings of some
of the houses.

I{It?} was not as severe as the earth quake{2 words?}
of 1884.

{05\18\1899} (Thursday) {Only "Thursday" is written next to the entry}

Went to work to day as usual.
{new paragraph?}
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.

05\19\1899 (Friday)

The weat_er{weather? text smudged} this morning was quite
ool, at noon it rained some,
bu cleared up before night.

This forenoon we welded a large
head of steel auto a{on?} steel arbor for
the seamless tube department which{whhich!}
was a herd{hard?} Job it weighed about 700
pounds and was bad steel to weld.

This evening I went to see Miss
Tatem the school teacher about the school
but she was sick with the intermittint/intermittent{?}
fever, came{?} home and drummed a
while, then went to bed very tired
as I got up a{at?} four this morning and
had worked all of the time since.

05\20\1899 (Saturday)

Worked at Benedict and Burnhams today
{new paragraph?}
This evening Clyde and I went to
the Town clerks office to look up the
records{reckords!} in regard to the place once{ance!}
owned by Capt Phineas Castle, now
he REsident of Mr. A.B. Pierpont.

05\21\{1899} (Sunday)

This morning Judge Boughton and
I went to the old Pryor place out
on the Middlebury road and mr.
Irving Prior{?} and I traced{traiced!} the old
Continental road through the Continental{Cantinental!}
lot and past{?} the old
Capt Nichols place and on past
the place where the last Indians
lived in Waterbury, which place
is about 100{?} rods North of the house
where Mr. Arden H Coe lives.
{new paragraph?}
The Indians who lived there were
he last remnant{remenenet!} of the Mel_eleck{Melmeleck?}
tribe and they remained{remaned!} till about
Fifty years ago. Mr. Hannah preached
at the Chapel.

05\22\{1899} (Monday)

Worked as usual. This evening
Mary Clyde and I went to Mr.
Garrigus to an entertainment
given by the University extension
class of Storrs College{Colleage!}


05\23\{1899} (Tuesday)

Worked till 4 o'clock, When I left the
shop and went to the City hall and
met Clyde, and we went into the
vault{valt!} in the Town Clerks office and searched
the records{reckards!}

05\24\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked; This evening Mary and
I went to the Chapel meeing and they
elected new officers, for the Episcopal{Episcapal!}
denomination Morris Alcott, Congregational{Cangrigational!}
Warren Hitchcock, Methodist{Metoodst!}
Willie Garrigus, Baptist Robert Warden,
Sec Arthur Pierpont, Treasurer Hiram
Able, Sunday School Superintendent{Superintindent!}
J Henry Garrigus, Librarian{Libraran!} Henry
Cass; Organist Inez Beckwith{?}.

05\25\{1899} (Thursday) {This entry is labelled 05\24\{1899} (Thursday)}

Worked at Benedict & Burnhams
to day.

This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.

05\26\1899 (Friday)

While working at Benedict and
Burnhams this morning Mr.
Byars{?} came and told me that
they would have to "lay me off"
for a while, as they did not have
work enough to keep{keepe!} me, am
to get through Saturday night.

This evening{,?} Charlie Hotchkiss{?}
and George Cass, came and practiced
drumming. We decided to go
to Cheshire and drum for the
"Old Soldiers{Souldiers!}" on decoration
day.

05\27\{1899} (Saturday)

I got through working at Benedict
& Burnhams to night, and
Mr. Musse{?} paid me what was
d__{due?}, 17.40.

I wrote a letter to the Rev. Mr.
Nichols of Cheshire telling him
that a number of the boys would
go over and drum, for the Old
Veterans on Memorial day, Clyde
carried the letter over, and Mr. Nichols
told him that they were to have no
parade in Cheshire, but that they
were to have a march, speaking
etc in Prospect, and told Clyde
to go there and see Mr. Beers who
lives near Prospect center, He
rode there on his wheel and found
Mr. Beers who seemed very much
pleased to think that a drum
Corps was coming.

05\28\1899 (Sunday)

Got up at 7 o'clock, washed my harness
and did other chores, had breakfast
at 9 George Cass came to see aboutt
going to Prospect to drum tuesday
at 10, Irving and I hitched up and
drove to Maruce Bergers{?} at Gilletts
corners to see him about some
carpenter work taht he spoke of
having done yesterday, but he
had decided not to do it, visited
with him a while and then went
to Prospect center and down the
Rag Hollow Road to Mr. Beers
but he had gone to Cheshire so
I did not see him, left word there
that we (the drummers would be
on hand at 11.30 tuesday.
{new paragraph?}
Then drove East to Matthews{?}
street and then turned North
up said street till{tell!} we came to
an old road that kept straight{strait!} ahead
at the turn Southeast of Agustus
Mass house, we went through
the old road which was very
rough and steep in some places
and it brought us out at prospect
station{statian!} on the Meriden Rail
Road, we continued still north
after crossing{crassing!} the tract and came
out at the lower end of Rag
hollow near the Old Gate
house on the Plank road, we then
drove home, and found Henry
Buckingham{?} and Charlie Hotchkiss
there to see me about going{gaing!} to
Prospect to drum. I sent Henry
Buckingham to Wolcott to notify
Luke Henderson and Adelbert
Norton, and I and Clyde went
to Pine Grove Cemetery to
place a flag on the grave of Mr.
E L Pond{Pand?}, a veteran who died
about two month ago, a committee{committiee!}
of veterans{veteras!}, (Capt Bangs,
Chancy Seeley Wm Melton
and one whom I did not know)
gave me the flag, we could
not find the grave that we
were sure was Mr. Ponds, so I
stuck the flag in a newly made
grave and, will find out tomorrow,
which is his.

Came home and found Aunt
Tan Somers{?} and Cousin David
there, who staid till it was quite
dark, when we sat down to
supper, after which George Cass
Came, and staid a little while
he said that Luke Henderson
was going to Prospect, when he
started home it was raining quite
hard.

Mr. Davenport preached at the
Chapel this afternoon.
{new paragraph?}
To bed at 9 o'clock.

{No entry is labelled for 05\29\1899}

05\29{30!}\{1899} (Monday)

The weather to day has been cloudy{clowdy!} and
a little wet. I worked about home till
4 o clock. When Irving and I went
to the Town Clerks office in the City
Hall, and looked the records{reckoids!} in
regard to the history of East Farms,
and the vicinity{vacinity!}.
{new paragraph?}
Came home at 7.30 and Charlie
Cass, George Cass, Charlie Hotchkiss,
irving and myself practiced drumming,
and dirges{durges!}, for the memorial{memoral!}
exercises tomorrow.

05\30{31!}\{1899} (Tuesday)

This morning I got up at 5.30 got out the
team and got ready to go to Prospect,
Margaret, Ruth, Charlie Hotchkiss,
Irving, and myself started in the
two seated canopy top wagon and
went to George Casses, and waited
for him and nellie to get ready.
{new paragraph?}
We then drove to Prospect center, and
put our teams out under the church
sheds{sheads!}, and what there was of us
"fell in," and marched to Mr. Beers
house East of the Center, and reported
for duty. We were told to wait till
noon and then occassionally{accasionly!} marched
round the green. The veterans arrived{arived!}
to the number of about 15, and
several others came from Cheshire,
and we went into the Church
and listened to an address by
Judge George H Cowell of Waterbury
and also by the Rev. Mr. Nichols,
of Cheshire, late of Waterbury, also
some fine singing by several young
ladies of Prospect, and recitations.
{new paragraph?}
Out of a population of less than 500
men, women, and children, Prospect sent
to the war 75 able bodied{bodyed!} soldiers{souldiers!},
this was more than any other town
in the state sent, in proportion to its
inhabitants.

_fter{After?} the service in the Church we
formed in the green in front,
The Drum Band first, the{then?} the Veterans
to the number{nunber!} of about 30 than about
20 sons of Veterans, the{then?} the School
children from all parts of the town,
each carrying bouquets and wreaths
of flowers, and marched to the Cemetery
to a Funeral dirge, there we marched
from grave to grave of the dead
soldiers{souldiers!} and placed flowers on
each, the band playing "Safe in the
arms of Jesus" after which we marched
to the hall under the church were there
was a bountiful colation served.

A vote of thanks was given to the
Drum Corps also to judge Cowell and
Rev. Mr. Nichols, after supper we played
out side, "Marching through Georgia"
and "Old Dan Tucker"{?} after which we
started for home. On the way we
stopped at the Reservoir on east
mountain and went to the boiling
spring, which was of great interest
to the others who had not seen it.
We then came home, and to bed
before 9 o'clock.

05{06!}\31{01!}\1899 (Wednesday)

Remained at home all day, put
up a vice in the carriage house and
repaired George Cass_s{Casses?} buggy.

In the evening Mary and I went
to the Chapel to a meeting of the
Sundayschool{1 word?} Officers and teachers.
I also called on mr. Tucker.
It was decided to hold a prayer{prgyer!} meeting
in the Chapel next Sunday evening.

06\01\1899 (Thursday)

Worked building a chicken yard
to day. The weather was very
warm.

This evening Mary and I
went to the Grange.

06\02\1899 (Friday)

Finished the chicken yard to
day. The afternoon went and
visited the Mill Plain School
{new paragraph?}
Miss F May Tatem{?} teaches the
primary room, my Pierpont
and Ruth were there. The school
was very orderly and the recitations
good.

Miss Minnie Norton teaches
the hiher{higher?} grade, where Margaret
and Irving attend, the lessons
were well recited and the order
very good.

A little past 5 o'clock the Fire
alarm{alarn!} gong sounded Number
14, which is corner of the Wolcott
street and East main. The fire proved
to be Fred Woods oil storage{storgge!} shed, at
he Meriden Railroad Station I{It?} was
Kerocene{Karocine!}, and gasoline and it
soon all burned.

06\03\1899 (Saturday)

This forenoon Clyde, Irving, and
myself worked drawing{drowing!} stones from
he North East corner of my lot to
the foundation of the Blacksmith
shop I am going to build by the
brook on he Doolittle road.

This afternoon I went to Robert
Wordens{?} at East Farms and packed
a pump{word hard to read} for him and repaired
two gates, For which he paid me
$1.00 which was the only dollar I have
earned this week.

06\04\{1899} (Sunday)

Went to the Chapel this afternoon
Mr. Buckley preached.
{new paragraph?}
Mary and Clyde went to Trinity
Church this evening, and saw
Bishop Brewster confirm a class of
sixteen members into the Episcopal
faith among whom was Arthur
and Mort Pierpont.

06\05\1899 (Monday)

To day has been one of the hottest
Helped Mary run the washing-machine{1 word or hyphenated?},
anc spent the rest of
the day in writing

Mrs. Hiram Able is 40 years
old, and this evening, the
neighbots to the number of about{alout!}
20 met at their house and congratulated
them.

06\06\{1899} (Tuesday)

Hot weather to day everi_____{everiry__y?}
is suffering for want of rain.

Painted the wagon house and
port{part?} of the Barn.

06\07\1899 (Wednesday)

The weather has been hotter than any
day yet, till about 4 o'clock this afternoon,
when a thunder shower went
around North of us and it cooled
the air very much.
{new paragraph?}
I worked painting all day, on my
out buildings.

This evening Mary and i went
over to John Gallaghers to see him
about the Flag raising exercises{excrcises!}
that are to take place at the Grange.

06\08\1899 (Thursday)

Got up at 5.30 this morning and
after breakfast went to town to hear
the case tried, "The City against
John F Gallagher for violating the
City ordinance{ordinence!} which requires milkmen
to have a license. The court{courst!}
was to be held in the new court
house, but is put over till next
Saturday.

From thence I went to the
Naugatuck Railroad Dep@ot and saw
35 new recruites{recrutes!} who had enlisted for
three years, board the train, it was
a sad sight, for some of the Mothers
and sisters and sweethearts{sweethars!} were there
and cried like children.
{new paragraph?}
There are to be hurried through to San-
francisco and there take ship for
Manilla. They are going in response{responce!}
to the Presidents call for 35.000 men.
{new paragraph?}
After the train had left
I got my team and drove to Bradley
ville{1 word?}, To see Frank Howland, but he
had gone to Oakville,{or .?} I drove there
and found that he was surveying
for Mr. Loren/Laren{?} Carter in the old
deer Park, drove to Mr. Carters
house and found that he was in
the Center, Came to Mr. Carters
office and found him.

This evening Mary and I went
to the Grange.

06\09\1899 (Friday)

Weather very dry. Worked painting
most of the day.

06\10{09!}\{1899} (Saturday)

The Boys and I worked about home
till about 5 o'clock, When I went to
see Mr. James Porter about shingling
the large barn at the Jessy Doolittle
place, where Charlie Cass now lives
Fifteen new recruites{recrutes!} left here this morning
_________ ________ {word is underlined}
for the Phillipines{Philipine!} Islands{Iislands!}, to serve 3 years.

06\11{10!}\{1899} (Sunday)

Clyde and I with Irving went
to the East Farms Cemetery
and Started to make a map of
it and a Record{Reckord!} of the persons
who were buried there.

Came home in time to go to
the Chapel to the service, Mr.
Parry of the Grand Street
Baptist Church preached.


06\12\{1899} (Monday)

This morning I hitched up the horse and
went to James Porters at 9 o'clock and
we went to A.L. Pecks, lumber yard
on Meadow street to look at shingles.
{new paragraph?}
The cheapest they had were 3.25 per 1000
{new paragraph?}
We also went to Tracy Brothers yard, and
to The Waterbury Lumber Co's yard.
{new paragraph?}
The price was the same everywhere.
{new paragraph?}
So we came back and mr. Porter
bought 6.500 hemlock{hemlack!} Shingles, from
there we went Ladds grocery store
on Grand Street, where Mr. Porter
bought some groceries. We then went
to a saloon{sbloon!} on Harrison alley and
I sat in the wagon while he went
into the "watercloset" he said, but he
was gone a long time, and when he
came out he felt good, I guess{gess!} he had
had something good to drink.
{new paragraph?}
We then went to D.B. Wilsons store
on East main STreet, and Mr. Porter
bought some nails, then came home,
I stoped at Mr. Porters and got his
ladder, and took it to the Doolittle
barn, and then ate my dinner.
In the afternoon, I striped the roof
of the old shingles and got some of
the new ones.

{Note in margin of text:
1/2 day.}

06\13\{1899} (Tuesday)

Worked to day shingling Charlie{Chartie!} Casses
arn. He helped me.

{Note in margin of text:
10 hr{?}}

06\14\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked to day on Charlie Casse's
barn. He helped me.
{new paragraph?}
Dexter Northrop died tonight at
about 7.30 o clock. Went to town tonight
to see Mr. Camp{?} about the mortgage{morgage!} on my
house.

06\15\{1899} (Thursday)

It was so hot that I only worked
6 hours, this was on Charlie Casses
barn. Sent Mr. Camp my bill
from Mr. Joseph Munder{?} deceased{deceised!}
for last years Interest and my receipts{recipts!}
for the same.

06\16\1899 (Friday)

Yesterday was one of the hottest
days ever known at this time
of year.

I worked shingling on Charlie
Cass barn 8 hours.

{Note in margin of text:
7 hr}

This barn was built by Mr. Jessy
Doolittle 60 years ago. Bur Chatfield{?}
did the kewing{?} and joiner work and
George Prichard{?} was his apprentice{apprintice!}
it is a large barn 36 x 40 ft with
16 ft posts{pasts?}.

I attended Dexter northrops
funeral, he was 58 years of age
{new paragraph?}
He served three{th_ee!} years in the
war in the 2nd Carm{?} Heavy
__ {underlining from previous line}
Artillery, was at the battle of
Winchester, and at Appomottax{?}
Court House when General{Genaral!} Lee
Surrendered, he was also in many
other battles.

06\17\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked on the barn at Charlie Casses
till noon.

After dinnr went and saw Charlie
Cass about repairing his barn pump
and milk tank, after which I went to
town, and took Pierpont with me.
{new paragraph?}
Went first to Hotchkiss & Templetons{?}
hardware store and traded{traided!} a 1 5/8
shell reamer for a new scythe and
.3{3?} lbs of 8d wire nails, also bought
one foot of 4 1/2 inch leather belt
for which I paid .35 cts, then went
to Hemingways fish market and
bough 1/2 peck of hard clams{?} for
which I paid .30 cts, then to the
Waterbury drug store and bought
2 sponges for which I paid .40 cts
and 10 cts worth of saltpeter{saltpetre!}, from
thence to Spencer and Pierpons
and bought 1 bag of oats for which
I paid 1.25 then to James Porters
and reckoned the labor of shingling
he barn, which amounted{announted!} to
10.75 and one bunch of shingles 1.15
which made 11.90 due me

{Notes in margin of text:
Next to "After dinner ..." 5 hr
Next to "hardware store ..." 1899}

06\18\1899 (Sunday)

This morning we got up at 7.30 o clock
I roasted the 1/2 ___{lbs?} of clams in the
fireplace in th cellar, and we had
them for breakfast.
{new paragraph?}
About 10.30 Charlie Hotchkiss and
and{written twice} got Rob Hotchkiss and went in
search{serch!} of a _ailing{bailing?} spring, near the
Meriden Road South of the house
of mr. Griswold, we could not find
it, so we went to Mr. Griswould{?}
and visited a spell and _te{ate?} cherrys
after which we came home, stopped
on the way at John French, and Bertha
gave us what chocolate{chockolate!} layer cake
we could eat and had some nice
water from their well.
{new paragraph?}
After supper of strawberry shortcake
Mary and I went to East farms
Cemetery and I finished making a
map of the same, came home and to bed at 9.30

06\19\1899 (Monday)

Helped Mary wash this{ihis!} morning, then set
a tire on the buggy, and did odd jobs the
est of the day.

Received a check to dy from James
Porter for 12.00 pay for work on Charles
Casses barn. They had their School meeting
at Eeast{?} Farm's last night, elected George Ben___{Benham?}
Committee, Wilson Pierpont, Clerk.

06\20\1899 (Tuesday)

Worked 4 hr at the Doolittle barn this
forenoon repairing the sleepers under
he floor.

This afternoon worked for Mrs.
Charles Frost weeding potatoes.

06\21\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked for Mrs. Charles Frost to day
hoeing. This evening they had a
strawberry festival at the Chapel
there was a large number present.
{new paragraph?}
Mr. John Lines orchestra {?} furnished music.

06\22\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked for Mrs. Charles Frost haying{?}.
{new paragraph?}
Went to th Grange this evening, They
had a memorial service, The Rev. Mr. Buckley{?}
spoke

06\23\1899 (Friday)

Weather dry and hot, there is not hay
scarcely, owing to the long draught{drauth!}.
{new paragraph?}
Worked for Mrs. Charles Frost.

06\24\{1899} (Saturday)

The weather to day has been hot, about
noon it began to thunder, and we worked
very fast and got the hay up just in
time so it did not get wet. It began
raining at 4 o'clock, and rained
till after night fall.

Mrs. Frost paid me 7.60 for 2 days
hoeing and 2 days and 3 hr haying,
15 cts per hr for hoeing and 20 for haying.

06\25\{1899} (Sunday)

I_{It, "t" is written above text} has{hos!} rained some to day. It was
childrens day at the Chapel and
Mr. Devenport talked to the children
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lockhart
had four children baptized.
{new paragraph?}
The attendance{attendence!} was large but not
what it would have been had it
not been for the rain.

06\26\{1899} (Monday)

Worked to day for Mrs. Frost at mowing
by hand.
{new paragraph?}
The weather has been cool and clear.
{new paragraph?}
This evening as we were at supper
at 7.10 o clock there was a severe earthquake
shock, which lasted about one
minute and shook everything.

Mr. Thoedore Munson{?} and
wife, Hiran{Hiram?} Able and wife, Charlie
Cass and wife, Albert Spender{?} and
wife, myself and wife, Eddie Bronson
and wife, and Miles Peck{?} & Agnes Able,
went to Mr. Robert Wordens at
East Farms. The occassion{occasion!} being
his Forty first birth day{two words?}.
{new paragraph?}
We presented him with two light
lap blankets. Had refreshments
and Ice Cream, and came home at
11.30

06\27\1899 (Tuesday)

To day "Buffalo Bill" (Col W.T. Cody{?},)
Has been in Waterbury with his "Wild West
and Congress of Rough riders of the World.
{new paragraph?}
The whole family went to town this
forenoon and saw the street parade.
{new paragraph?}
This afternoon Clyde, Irving, Margaret,
and myself went to the "Hop Meadows"
wouth of the Electic car barns and
saw the show.

The programme consisted of
1 Overture; Star Spangled Banner,
by Cow-boy Band
2 Grand Review; introducting the
Rough Riders, of the world, Indians,
Cow-Boys, Mexicans, Arabs, Scouts,
Guides, and detachments of fully
equipped Regular Soldiers of the armies{?}
of America, England, Germany, and
Russia, a color Guard of Cuban veterans,
and a squad of Hawaiian,
Porto{Puerto?} Rican{Ricon?} and Filipino{Phillipino?} Rough Riders,
3 Miss Annie oakley, a celebrated shot,
who illustrated{illustriated!} her dexterity in shooting
glass balls, from almost every position
4 Race of Races. Race between a Cow-boy,
a Cossack{Cassack!}, a Mexican, an Arab, a Gaucho{Goucho!},
and an Indian. On Spanish-Mexican
Bronco{Branco!}, Russian, Indain and Arabian
horses.
5 U.S. Artillery Drill. By veterans
of Capt Tharp's{Thorp's?} Battery D, Fifth Reg
U S Artillery.
6 Illustrating{Illustriating!} a Prairie emegrant{?}
tain crossing the plains, It is attacked
by a band of Indians, who are
in turn repulsed{ripulsed!} by "Buffalo Bill"
and a number of scouts.
7 Pony Express.{,?} A former Post
rider showed how dispatches{despatches!} were
delivered on the plains, before
the building of railroads{ailrodds!} and telegraph.
8 A group of Mexicans; who illustrated{illustriate_!}
the use of the lasso.
9 The Battle of San Juan Hill. Introducting
detachments of Roosevelt's Rough Riders,
24th infantry, 9th and 10th Cavalry,
Grimes battery, Garcias Cubian scouts,
Pack train, Etc.
Scene 1 A halt{?} on the Road to San Juan,
" 2 Storming of the hill,
10 A Group of Riffian{Ruffian?} Arab Horsemen{Horsman! Horseman?},
illustrated{illustriated!} their style{stile!} of horsemanship,
together{togather!} with natiove sports and pasttimes{pastimes!}.
11 Johnny Baker, Celebrated American
Marksman.
12 Cossacks{Cassacks?}, from the Cancassus/Concassus{?} of
Russia, in feats of horsemanship native
dances, Etc.
13 Gimkana Race.
14 Cow-Boy fun. Picking objects from
the ground, lassoing wild horses,
riding buckers, etc.
15 Indians, from the Sioux, Arrapahoe{?},
Brule{?} and Cheynne{Cheyenne?} tribes
illustrated{illustriated!} the Indian mode of
fighting etc.

{Note in margin of previous page, page 186 of manuscript:
I remember all of this vividly, I was 10.
M.H.}

16 Military musical drill, by a detachmen_{detachment?}
of the 16th Lancers (Queens{?} own) British
army, and a detachment from the Garde
Kurassiers{?} of his Majesty{Magest!} Kaiser Wilhelm II
17 Sirth{Sixth?} United States Cavalry, veterans
rom Col Summers Reg at Ft Meyer
Va.
18 Attack on the Deadwood Mail,
coach by Indians.
19 Racing by Indian boys on bareback
horses.
20 Three minutes with the Rough riders
of the world.
21 "Buffalo Bill" om feates{fetes!} of sharpshooting
while riding at full speed.
22 Buffalow{Buffalow!} Hunt, as it was in the
far west, exhibiting{erhibiting!} a herd of buffalo.
23 Attack on settlers Ca_in{Cabin?}, by Indians
24 Salute by entire Company.

06\28\1899 (Wednesday)

This morning the weather was
damp, went to Mrs. Frosts and
worked till 10 o'clock, when it began
to rain. Then came home and
worked repairing chairs and repairing
the grave stone of Mrs. Rily
Alcott{?} who died 1877 aged 90.

{Note in margin of text:
3 hr}

This evening went to the School
meeting, and the following
Officers were elected.
Committee{Comittee!} Warren Hitchcock.
Clerk, B. F. Hoggett{?}.
Treasurer, Martin Pond,
Collector James Stovelle,
{new paragraph?}
They also voted to lay a tax of
5 mills on the list of 1899.
{new paragraph?}
And also voted to build a fence
around the back part of the yard.
{new paragraph?}
Mark Warner has been Committee
man for the past 12 years, and
fought hard for the election this
time. He canvassed the district
thoroughly, as did we of the
Hitchcock factor. Warner
had 16 votes, Hitchcock 21 votes
Albert Spender 1 and Mark Pond 1.
{new paragraph?}
We hope to have a better School
now.

06\29\1899 (Thursday)

Worked for Mrs. Charles Frost at haying
7 hours. Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening

I read a portion of a paper, the title
of which was, "The assistance the
French rendered the American's during
the war of Independence{Indipendenc!}, including
the march of Rachambeans army,
{"togather, with" has been crossed out} and historical facts concerning
the route.

06\30\{1899} (Friday)

Worked for Mrs. Frost.

07\01\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked for Mrs. Frost hoeing and
haying. Very hot weather.

Received 8.00 for four days
work.

07\02\{1899} (Sunday)

The weather was very warm all
day, went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Dr. Parry of the Grand STreet
Baptist Church preached.

07\03\1899 (Monday)

To day we got in part of the barn
meadow at Mrs. Frosts

Mother started to day for Detroit

Mich{?} to visit Fred, she has taken
dvantage of the excersion{excurtion!} of the
Society of Christian Endeavor{Endeveor!},
who hold a national convention
there

07\04\1899 (Tuesday)

To day is the Fourth{Forth!} of July the
children were up before three
o'clock, and were firing blank
pistol cartridges, caps, torpedoes,
firecrackers, etc, Etc,

When I got up I fired off my
old musket, which greatly interested
the boys, as it made as
much noise as a cannon that
they had, in the evening we
went to Thoedore Munsons
where the neighbors were collected
and fired off fireworks Etc, and
had cake, icecream{1 word?}, and other
refreshments.

07\05\1899 (Wednesday)

Worked at Mrs. Frosts all day
had a severe shower this afternoon

This forenoon as I was mowing in
the North East corner of the barn
meadow, next to the Meriden
road Dr. Freebourne came from
the East in his new horseless{horsless!}
wagon, he was going very fast
and made the dust fly.
{new paragraph?}*
His is the first horseless{horsless!} wagon
owned by anyone in Waterbury,
and the second that was ever
here. The first was in the parade
of Forepanis{Forepauis?} circus last
year, both run with gasoline{gasolene!}
and have rubber pneumatic
tires, Dr. Freebourne went from
Waterbury center to Hitchcocks
pond a distance of five miles
in twenty-five minutes
yesterday, and returned to
day in fifteen{fiftein!} minutes.

07\06\1899 (Thursday)

Worked at Mrs. Frosts nine
hours to day.

It rained this forenoon but
in the afternoon it was hot.

Mrs. Gilbert Duryeea{?} died
early this morning aged{gged!} 70
years.

She was formerly{formily!} Mrs. Thomas
Harper, and her Maiden name
was Julia Farrell, daughter
of Benjamin.

07\07\{1899} (Friday)

Weather threatened rain this
forenoon, But came clear
at noon and we got in most{mast!}
of the hay that was out at Mrs.
Frsosts, and I got throught to night
after working 9 hours, they paid
me $7.60{?} the amount due.

Mother Pierpont came and mary
and her wnet to Mrs. Duryeas
funeral at Pine Grove cemetery.
{new paragraph?}
Mother Pierpont, and Mrs. Duryea{?}
went to school together{togather!} at Saw Mill
Plain, when they were girls.

07\08\1899 (Saturday)

It has rained hard most all
day, Clyde and I went out to
Mr. J. H. Garrigus, in the South
part of Wolcott and he wishes
me to come and work for him
next Monday, from thence
we went to Woodtick and then
home, and repaired Charlie
Casses milk wagon in the afternoon.

07\09\1899 (Sunday)

Went top the Chapel{Chaple!} this afternoon
and heard Mr. Raft__{Raften? Rafter?} of
the Waterville Episcopal church
preach, after which we went to
East Farms and carried Mother
Pierpont home, and Mary and
I went to the Cemetery and
finished a record of the grave
stone inscriptions, that I
was making.

07\10\1899 (Monday)

Went to work for J Henry Garrigus
this morning haying.

07\11\{1899} (Tuesday)

Worked to day at Jacob Henry Garrigus

07\12\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked this day at Henry Garrigus

07\13\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked to day at J Henry Garrigus.
This evening went to the
Flag raising, and Childrens
day exercises at the Grange Hall.
{new paragraph?}
D_{Dr.?} John G. Davenport made the
address ad Miss Bessie Garrigus
was the Goddess-of-Liberty and
raised the flag.
{new paragraph?}
George Cass, Charlie Hotchkiss,
Irving, and myself{mysilf?} drummed
and Charlie Cass, fifed.

At the exercises in the hall the
crowd was so great that all of
the room was taken and many
could not get in.

07\14\1899 (Friday)

This morning I arose at 5 o'clock
and worked in the Garden till six.
Then started to work at Mr.
Garrigus, The clock was{ws!} 15 minutes
slow and I was at George Hitchcocks
when the whistles blew for seven
and buy{busy?} hurrying the horse got
there a little late. Had dinner
there, which consisted of string
beans, peas{pease!}, canned salmon{samon!},
boiled potatoes, berries, tea,
coffee, etc.

This evening we finished haying
and I got through, Mr. Garrigus
paid me 5.00 and still owes me
3.75

07\15\{1899} (Saturday)

This day the weather has been perfect;
I worked in the garden, while Clyde went{wend!}
down to james Porter's and milked his
cow, and Irving drove Mr. Painters
cow to pasture, after which we ate
breakfast of scrambled eggs and
cold boiled ham.
{new paragraph?}
We then hitched up and went to
Jacob Henry Garrigus, and helped
him hoe his musk and watemelons{one word or hyphenated?},
and Clyde helped him
cultivate his potatoes, while Irving
and I set out about 200 cabbage
plants, which Mr. Garrigus
said he would give me, together{togather!}
with the ground to grou_{grous? grow?} them
on, we finished at noon, and then
ate dinner under an apple tree in the
Aouth orchard. AFter dinner Frank,
Irving and I, had William Garrigus
cut our hair, after which we went
to the Reservoir near Shelton Hitchcocks,
and had a swim and then
drove home, passing on our way
a party of men who are preparing{prepairing!}
to put up a telegraph line from
New York to Boston.
{new paragraph?}
We got home and had supper of
boiled peas, after which I{?} hoed in
the garden a spell and then read
he papers, and Mary and Irving
went to town to buy a bag of
oats, and a wash-boiler.

07\16\1899 (Sunday)

To day it has rained in showers,
and has been very warm.

Went to the Chapel{Chaple!} this afternoon
and heard the Rev. Mr. Bassett preach.

07\17\1899 (Monday)

This day I worked about home this
Forenoon, and in the afternoon went
to Mother Pierpont's a__{and?} repaired the
East door where the sill and jamb ___{bow? had?}
rotted{ratted?} away. In the evening mary
and I went to Simosbille and visited
Uncle Dwight Somers, and I called on
Mr. Kenworthy to see about work
a{at?} Benedict & Burnhams, he said
that the Blacksmiths were now
caught up with their work nicely,
but ff{if?} there was a man needed in
a permanent{perminent!} place he would give
me the chance.

Mr. Tobin{?} of Rogers Brothers sent
Henry Buckinham to see me to
day, to have me call and see him
about working at Rogers Brother's

07\18\1899 (Tuesday)

This forenoon I wrent to ____ __ {entire word or words are smudged
and difficult to read. "work at"?} Rogers
Brothers Factory and saw Mr. Tolen{Tobin?}
and made a bargain to go to work
tomorrow at 2.00 per day to start with
and my pay to be raised after a while
three or four weeks.

Spent the rest of the day in drawing
stone for my blacksmith shop.

07\19\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked to day at Rogers Bros
My first Job was, to oil up the
shafting, Then I repaired an overhead{over-head?}
trolley, then repaired a step
ladder, then made a lot of belt
holders, then made a key for a lock
to my cubbard{cubbord!}, and repaired several,
belts etc.

Mr. Burgher stoped this morning
and wanted me to go to work
at Benedict & Burnhams.

07\20\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers factory to
day. Mary and I went to the Grang{Grange?}
this evening.

07\21\{1899} (Friday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers factory

07\22\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers.
{new paragraph?}
This evening Irving and I went to town
and I called on Dr. Davenport, he gave
me a picture of himself to be hung
in the Mill Plain Chapel, we then
bought a rool{roll?} of picture wire at Hassi's{Hassis?}
store on Grand Street, and one gallon{gallond!}
of molasses at Heaters store on East
Main Street

07\23\1899 (Sunday)

It rained very hard during the night
and thundered and lightened.
{new paragraph?}
This afternoon Mary and I went
to the Chapel and heard Mr.
Davenport preach.
{new paragraph?}
They have put a new heating
furnace{furnice!} in the cellar of the Chapel{Chepal!}
last week.

07\24\1899 (Monday)

I worked at Rogers Brothers Factory
to day

{The label 07\25\{1899} (Tuesday) has been crossed out next to
this entry. Further down in the margin is the date 07\26\{1899}
(Wednesday). What date does this entry get? Is the entry one
entry with the label 07\26\{1899} (Wednesday)?}

Worked to day at Rogers Brothers
Factory to day
{new paragraph?}
Received{Recived!} my pay $9.00 for 4 days
work last week.
{Is this next paragraph labelled 07\26\{1899} (Wednesday)
Mr. Harry Garrigus called
and left #3.75 the amount he
owed me.

07\27\{1899} (Thursday)

Went to the Shop as usual
{new paragraph?}
Mary and i went to the Grange
this evening

07\28\{1899} (Friday)

Worked at Rogrs Bros.

07\29\1899 (Saturday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers
as usual.

07\30\{1899} (Sunday)

Stayed about home all day, except
that we went to the Chapel this afternoon.

07\31\{1899} (Monday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers factory
to day, from 7 o clock to 12.30 and
from 1 P.M. to 5.30.

08\01\{1899} (Tuesday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers
factory to day.

08\02\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked as usual to day.
Mother came home from Detroit
Mick, to day, got to town at 8 o'cloc{o'clock?}
{new paragraph?}
The Mill Plain Sunday
School held their annual picnic
at the house of J.H. Garrigus
to day, all of my family attended
except myself, there were present
about 200 people, and they had
a good time.

08\03\1899 (Thursday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers to
day

This evening Mary and I attended
the Grang{Grange?}.

08\04\{1899} (Friday)

Worked as usual
{new paragraph?}
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps met for practice at Luke
Hendersons house __{in?} Wolcott
Clyde, Irving and myself went
up in the Canopy top wagon, and
carried the BAss drum also Howard
Neils, George Atkinson's, and Irvings
and mine, we drummed{drumbed!} nearly
all of the way up.
{new paragraph?}
There were present, Adelbert
Nortou, Howard Neil, who walked
out Gardener hall, who walked
out, Henry Buckinghan{Buckingham?}, who
rode his wheel out, Georg Atlkinson,
who came on his wheel, Charlie Cass
who drove out, and Charlie Hotchkiss
and George Cass, who drove out,
besides Clyde Irving and myself.

After drumming and marching till
after 9 30{930?} o clock we went into the hous_{house?}
and had cake and ice-cream, after
which we came home, atopping
on the way at John Frenches and
we George Cass, Charlie Hotchkiss,
Clyde, Irving, and myself, marched
round and round the house, till
we got the girls up, got home at
12 o'clock.

08\05\1899 (Saturday)

I worked to day at Rogers Brothers
factory, got out at 4.30 and came
home and worked laying stone
wall till near dark, when I had
to stop on account of my lame
foot troubling{troubleing!} me, the pain
being very great.

08\06\1899 (Sunday)

Got up at 8 o'clock, had breakfast
of beef soup and watermelon, after
which I wrote 5 letters, then read the
papers till 1 O'clock{o'clock!} when I got ready
and went to teh Chapel __{an? and?} heard
Mr. R.A. Collins preach, he came
from Cheshire.

After Chapel service mary and
I went to Mr. Henry Garrigus
and took supper there, we had
baked beans, canned{caned!} salmon{samon!},
bread, potatoes etc.
{new paragraph?}
Sar Mrs. Lucian Upson{?} who
is a real daughter of the REvolution
{should there be a "," at the end of the previous line}
that is, Her Father who was
Levi Johnson of Wolcott{Woolcott!} was
a soldier of the REvolutionary
army.

After hearing Miss Bessy
play on the Piano, we came
home, saw where the town
are repairing the ZMeriden road
from Munsons corner East
For the purpose of building a
bycible{bicicle!} path.

This Evening mary and Irving
went to the Chapel to a Prayer meeting

When Clyde came home after goint
to Arthur Pierponts after milk
for Charlie Cass, he told us that
he did not think that J J Byan{?}
could live till morning, as he
has had a bad day.

08\07\1899 (Monday)

Got up this morning at 5 o'clock, and
called Clyde and Irving and we went
to work laying the stone wall, till half
past 6 o clock when I went to the shop.
{new paragraph?}
Clyde has worked to day at James
Porters cutting brush.
{new paragraph?}
After I got home tonight we worked
on the wall again till dark.

There was an awful{auful!} accident on the
new trolley line that was opened
last Thursday, between Stratfor
and Shelton yesterday afternoon
in which 29 people were killed, and a
number wounded.

The trolley car jumped the track
on a trestle at Pecks Mills three miles
north of Stratford, and fell 68 feet
into the mud at the bottom{botton!} of the
pond which was 7 ft deep, the water
had been drawn{?} off to permit
the building of the trestle.
{new paragraph?}
This was the worst accident I
ever heard of about here happening
on a railroad.

08\08\1899 (Tuesday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers as
usual.

08\09\{1899} (Wednesday)

This day I received{recived!} my pay from
Rogers Bros 13.50 for last weeks work

08\10\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked at the factory to day.
{new paragraph?}
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange, there were 54 members
present, the whole membership is
about 140.

08\11\1899 (Friday)

Worked at the International Silver
Company's, factory on Silver street.
{new paragraph?}
Factory J is the name of Rogers
Brothers plant,
since it has been purchased{purcheased!} by
he International Silver Co, some
six months ago.

This evening the drummers met
here and after practicint{practiceng?} a while
we marched into the house, and
into the large room, where several
ladies and children were assembled
and had lemonade cake etc, and
a good time generally.

08\12\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked as usual, weather very hot.
Mrs. Jennie{"Jennie" was inserted} Russell of Worcester went away
this after noon.

08\13\1899 (Sunday)

This forenoon the weather was
very hot.

Did not get up this morning
until 8.30 o clock, had breakfast
of roasted{rocasted!} round clams after which
I read till nearly noon, when
I got ready and at three went
to the Chapel.{./} Rev. Dr. Rooland{?}
preached, the attendance{attendence!} was
not large.

This afternoon I wrote a letter
to Perry C Morris{?} First Slectman{Setectman!},
about the town paying
the tuition{tution!} for Clyde and Irving
going to the High school this
coming{corning!} winter.

Also wrote a letter to Brother Fred
in Detroit, and another to the
Rev. A G Hubbard of Woodstock
Conn{?}, ordering a history of
the town of Goshen, Conn.

08\14\1899 (Monday)

Today my foot has pained
me very much.

Weather has been nice and cool.

Worked as usual at Rogers Bros,
Had Clyde pay my last years
town and center school tax, he
had to pay 2.25 extra for three
Liens that are filed in the town
clerks office.

I have just came{come?} across a rule
which I have had much use for before
now, That is that One gallon
of water weighs 3 1/3 pounds, and
contains 231 cubic inches.

{Note in margin of text:
Weight of
1 gal of water}

08\15\{1899{ (Tuesday)

The weather has been quite cool
to day.

Mrs. D.B. Hamilton, widow
of Capt. D B Hamilton{the "a" in Hamilton is crossed out} offered
last evening before the committee{cammittee!}
on parks to buy the 45
acres of land bounded by Silver
street on the West, Plank Road
on the North, Brass{Bross?} Mill road
on the East, and Ma_{Mad?} Riber on the
South, and present it to the
City of Waterbury for a park.
The name to be Hamilton Park
in honor of Captain hamilton.

08\16\1899 (Wednesday)

Worked to day as usual at Rogers &
Brothers.

08\17\{1899} (Thursday)

To day I worked as usual.
{new paragraph?}
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange. They held an open
meeting, the occassion{occasion!} being Floras
might{?}. The Worthy Flora is Mrs.
Thomas Fairclough of Wolcott.
The meeting was largely{largly!} attended.
The Programme was as{os!} follows,
1 Song by the Grange Choir,
2 Remarks by Judge Cowell,
3 Reading by Mr. Cook, of Natharolists{Naturalists?} club,
4 Singing by the German Concordia Quartette{Quartet?},
5 Talk by Prof Sturg__{Sturggs?} of N. Haven Exp station{slation!},
6 Recitation, Miss Deitridge,
7 Song, Mr. Byrnes,
8 Talk, Mr. D G. Porter,
9 Singing, Concordia{Concardia!} Singing Society{Saciety!},
{no number 10 is listed}
11 Talk on flowers, Mr. Dallis{?},
12 Talk, D B Hotchkiss,
13 Spanish Dance, Miss Ida Mainard,
14 Song by Grange,
Supper,

08\18\1899 (Friday)

The weather to day has been hot
although the sun has not shown.

To day two men who are working
on the American Telegraph an{on? and?} Telephone
line from Boston to New York, putting
up the poles came to our house to
board.

This evening the Drum Corps came
and practiced and we went up
to John French's and had lemonade
and cake, there was{?} a number of
girls and young folks there and we
had a good time.

08\19\1899 (Saturday)

Worked as usual. The independent{indipendent!}
order of Faresters{Forrestors?} went to pleasure
beach to day on an excursion.

08\20\{1899} (Sunday)

To day is Sunday and it is very hot and
dry, no rain has yet fallen this month

We attended the Chapel this evening
Mr. Fred Goodrich formity{formerly?} a Waterbury
boy, but now of Minnesota{Minisota!}
preached an excellent{exelelent!} sermon{cermon!},
after Chapel Mary and I drove
out the Meriden Road to see
the new bicycle{bicicle!} path that they are
uilding.

08\21\{1899} (Monday)

Worked at Rogers Brothers Fctory{?}
Clyde went to the Adams Express
office this morning and got a
history of the town of Goshen which
I bought of A. G Hibbard{?} of Woodstock{Woodstack!}
for 3.25 he paid 25 cts express
on it.

08\22\{1899} (Tuesday)

The weather to day has been very
warm. To morrow{Tomorrow?} Thomas Malone{Molone?}
and Pat Mc Namara, two young
men who are boarding here, and
working on the American Telephone
and Telegraph line, building it
are going to be removed to Soughington{?},
along with the rest of the
gang which numbers 75{?}.

08\23\{1899} (Wednesday)

All of my family{familly!} exce__{except?} myself{muself!}
went to High-rockj grove to the
grange picnic, they had a fine
time.

08\24\1899 (Thursday)

Worked as usual at the shop.
{new paragraph?}
This evening mary and I
went to the Grange.

08\25\1899 (Friday)

Worked a usual at Rogers Brother_{Brothers?}
{new paragraph?}
This evening a number of the drummers
went to Mr. Adelbert Nortons{?}
in Wolcott to dru_{drum?}. They were
Henry Buckingham, George
Atkinson, Irving, Clyde,
and myself, in my team.
{new paragraph?}
George{Gearge!} Cass, and Gardner Hall
in George Casses team.
{new paragraph?}
Charlie Hotchkiss,{,?} and Sam
Squires in Charlie Hotchkiss
team, and Charlie Cass and
wife in his team.
{new paragraph?}
We had a fine time, Drummed{?}
most of the way up and march__{marched?}
up the road to mr. Frank
Munsons house, and down to
Lewis Cooks, then returned
and he lemonade and ice
cream, got home at 12 o clock{o ctock!}.

{Note in margin of text:
I was there:{;?} M. Hall.}

08\26\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked to day as usual.

08\27\{1899} (Sunday)

Staid home till evening, when I
drove to East Farms and saw Mr.
Worden{Warden?} about going to town tomorrow{to-morrow?}
night to see about sending
our children who are to{too?} far advanced
for the school in our district, to
the Highschool in the center.

Did not go to the Chapel as
George Edwards called just before
Chapel time{?} and I did not get ready
Mr. Upson preached. He is from
Milford. I knew him in 1876 when
he preached in Wolcott.

08\28\{1899} (Monday)

Worked as usual at Rogers Brothers

08\29\{1899} (Tuesday)

I worked at the factory to day.

08\30\1899 (Wednesday)

Worked to day. Had a smashup in
the shop which will necessitate the shutting{shuttring?}
down of the shop, a large driving
pully{pulley?} on the main shaft broke.
{new paragraph?}
Robert Worden{Warden?} and I went to town
tonight to see mr. Morris the First
selectman, about getting our childre_{children?}
into{snto?} the center school and having
he state pay for it, the same as
they do in other towns that
have no highschool. We could
not find him, we also went last
monday night but failed to
find him.

08\31\1899 (Thursday)

This day I went to the shop and
worked till 9.30 when I went to
town and called at the Selectmens{?}
office to see Mr. Morris the
first selectman but he was
not in, I then went to the Assessors
office and saw sister Ive who
orks there. From thence went
and saw Wiffred{Wilfred?} Griggs a member
of the school board, at 140 Grand
street, talked about the center school
He told me that the town board
had nothing to do with the City
schools, then went to the Bronson
Library{Lybrary!} and saw Mr. Bassett the
Chairman of the town school board
he also told me that the City schools
are entirely separate{sepirate!} from the town.
{new paragraph?}
I then reutnred to the Selectmens
office and met Mr. Marris{?} who
appeared very genteel. He admitted
that he knew but little of school
matters, but saw the injustice of
obliging the parents of children
having to pay 8 and 10.00
tu___hion{tuushion? tuition?} while the children of
all other towns can go free, the
state having to pay.

09\01\1899 (Friday)

To day the weather has been very
warm and dry. Worked in the shop
as usual. This evening we had
a Drum Corps meeting, there was
present Chas Cass, Henry
Buckingham, George Atkinson
and Myself. We elected the
following new members, Charlie
Hotchkiss, George Cass, Clyde Miller
_ammie{?} Squires, Irving Miller,
Howard Neil, and Harry Buckingham{?}

09\02\1899 (Saturday)

It began raining duyring the
night and has rained at times
all day. The belt which has been
nade{made?} at the Farrell Foundry and
machine Company's works came
today, and we set{?} to work putting
it on the main shaft, so the shop
will start Tuesday.
{new paragraph?}
This evening Robert Worden{?}
and I went toi see Mr. Kendrst{?}
the town attorney about sending
children to the center school
He was off and we got no
satisfaction.

09\03\{1899} (Sunday)

Clyde, Irving and myself left
home this morning, and drove over
Silver Street to Dublin street, thence
through Washington street to Brooklyn
and on over Town Plob by the new
Schoolhouse, then west and South over
melmeleck hill to Brodleyville, Then South
westerly{weste'rly!} to Guntown, then following
in the vicinity{vacinity!} of the New England
Railroad on the south side of{af!} it for
a few miles we went to oxford, stoppin_{stopping?}
in the woods on the way to feed the horse
and eat our own dinner,{,?} of vituals
that Mary had put up for us.
{new paragraph?}
Oxford is a country town situated in
a valley, a small river runs through
the village{villege!}. The place consists of two
churches and about a dozen houses,{,?} probably
here is a store, but we{us?} did not see it.
From there we turned west by a
church and went up an old road
to Quaker farms, which was a
pretty village{villege!} situated{sitiated?} on Eight
mile River. The country in this section
is very interesting. Hills of great
size, with considerable valleys between
and in places the sides of the hills
are rent with gorges. The sides of
many of the hills are for the mostpast{most-part?}
covered with thick green woods, while
the flat lands of the valleys and the tops
of the hills are cleared to meadow and
grazing land. From Quakers Farms{Farm_? plural?}
we went to Zoar Bridge{?} by a very crooke_{crooked?}
and hilly road,{,?} Zoar Bridge is built
on the old suspension plan the calbes
are of Five 1 1/2 inch wire ropes
all bound together{togather!}, there are two of
them, one on each side, and they are
well anchored at the ends in solid
masonry, the bridge is of wood
painted white, except the iron which
is black, which with the towers makes
a very pickuresque structure. From
the bridge we traveled a hilly, crooked,
and lovely{tovely!} road through Stevenson
to Monroe in Fairfield county.
This village{?} consists of two churches
a store, several houses, and a fine
new building which I took to be a
public library{lybrary!}, which together{togather!} with
a nice center green{is "green" underlined?} made a pretty
ountry village. Without stopping
we continued our Westward course
to Upper STepney which place we
reached after dark, where we found
lodgins at the house of Mr. Hawley.

The weather has been warm, and as
night set in flashes of lightening
lit up the heavens, and soon thunder
began to rool{roll?}, and at about nin
o'clock we had a heavy shower.

The distance traveled to day has
been about 42 miles
{new paragraph?}
Dr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain Chapel.

09\04\1899 (Monday)

This day; is Labor day; and is a
legal holiday{hollowday!} in this state.

This morning we arose at 5.45 and
went out to take a look at Stepney{Stetney?}.
{new paragraph?}
After stolling{strooling!} about the park, I
looked at my compass and wondered
if the pointer had changed{chainged!} ends
and the dark colored and pointed
South, I could rardly{hardly?} believe{beleave!} that
the sun was rising in the East,
But the sun and compass was
all right,{,?} and I was twisted.
Stephney is a pretty place of about
12 or 15 houses, and two Churches
Baptist and Methodist and one store
which had the Post Office in it, It
was kept by Mr. Hawley who we staid
with. At 6.30 we had breakfast of ham
and Eggs etc. After which I paid Mr.
Hawley $1.50 for our lodgings etc, after
which we hitched up and started for
Reading Ridge nine miles distant,
the road was very crooked and hilly
but quite interesting, we stoped
at a Blacksmith shop and had two
new shoes pul{put?} on the horse's fore{?} feet,
for which I paid 50 cts, at this place
the road crossed a small river which
ran over ledges and ro_ks{rocks/} to the exten_{extent?}
that there was about seventyfive feet
fall in about ten rods distance,
and there was a Sawmill, a Grist
mill, another mill, and a place
where a mill had stood, which took
the water one{?} after the other.
{new paragraph?}
After leaving the Blacksmith shop
we journeyed on and after climbing
a long steep and crooked hill reached
Redding Ridge, where we turned North
near the church and went about
four miles to Putnam park.

This park is a very interesting and
historic{historick!} spot, there is a monument
here erected to the memory of the men who
suffered{seffered!} there.

{There is a drawing of a monument in the middle of
this page. There are four blocks with text in each
corner around the monument.

The following is written on the drawing of the monument:
Erected
to Commer{?}
ate the
winter
quarters
of

The following is written in the block labelled South:

Putnam.
McDougal.
Poor.
Prsons.
Huntington.

The following is written in the block labelled North:

The World
if full of their Praises

Posterity
stands astonished
at their Deeds.

The following is written in the block labelled East:

The men of 76
who suffered here
To preserver forever their
Memory
The State of Connecticut
has erected this monument.
A.D. 1888.

The following is written in the block labelled West:

Erected to Commemorage
the Winter Quarters of
Putnam's Division of
The Continental Army
Nov 7 1778.
May 25 1779.}

{new paragraph?}
There are still to be seen the remains of
130 fire places, each of which are all that
is left of a hut about 10 x 16 feet square in
which the soldiers staid. There were
quartered here Poors New Hampshire Brigade
also the brigades of Parsons, Huntington{?},
McDugal, and Colonel Elishia
Sheldons Regiment of Calvary.
{new paragraph?}
The troops remained there from Nov
7th 1778 to May{Mgg!} 25 1779, a fin_{fins?} monument
10 ft square at the base and about 45 fet
high stands within the old camp
round.

There has been many improvements{improvments!}
made about the Park in the way of
drives. Two block-houses, one each
side of the entrance{enterence!}, three heavy
cannons, several log buildings
and a large pavillion{provillion!}, etc. There
several large caves in a ledge North
East of the old camp, and also two
ponds, I_{It?} is not a favorite place
for Church picnic parties, and public
festivities.

At 12.30 we got into our Spindle buggy
and started for home, and were obliged
to drive South towards Redding about
2 miles in order to get onto the Newtown{?}
road. Went then to New-town{?}
10 miles. From thence in a round-a-bout
way to Sandyhook{?} 5 miles, thence to
Sandyhook station, 4 miles, where we
left Irving to take the train to
Waterbury. Clyde and I continued
on{.?} and crossed the Housatonic river
at the new iron bridge above the
Rail Road bridge, and drove to Southbury
6 miles, then to Middlebury
6 miles, then to Waterbury, 6 miles,
and home 2 miles, makeing a total
of 53 miles traveled to day. _y{thy?} team.

09\05\1899 (Tuesday)

Worked to day as usual at the
International Silver works.

09\06\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked as usual, Received{Recived!} 13.50 my
last weeks pay.

09\07\1899 (Thursday)

Worked as usual to day, this evening
Mary and I attended the Grange.

09\08\{1899} (Friday)

To day I worked as usual. This evening
we had a drum Corps meeting.

09\09\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked at the factory to day.

09\10\{1899} (Sunday)

This forenoon Father Called and wanted
me to go with him to a clambake
out on Southington mountain at
Mr. Morris Hemingways hotel,
I told him that I would go
Mr. Fred Brainard ar{or?} Mr. Runge
of Meriden{Merriden!} called and wanted
to buy a power blower which I
have, I bargained to sell it to him
for $4.00

Father called at noon for me to
go to the clambake, and when we
got there we found the bake nearly
ready. They were baked the Rhode
Island way that is by making a
bed of loose{loase!} stones about 14 inches
deep and 5 or 6 feet across and
then bulding a fire on the bed
which het{heat?} the stones very hot,
hen when the stones are hot
enought the fire is swept off the
stones and they are covered with
sea weed and they put on 1 barrel
of little-neck{little-neh!} clams, and 1 barrel{barrell!} of
long clams{clans!}, 1 dozen lobsters{lbsters!}, and
1/2 dozen blud fish, some chickens
a lot of common{cammon!} potatoes and
some sweet potatoes, also
a lot of green corn, the whole
of which they buries with
Sea weed and covered with sail
cloth, and the hot stones steamed
it about 1/2 hour when it was
done, there were about 20 persons
present, and all had what they
could eat and there was quite
a little left.

09\11\1899 (Monday) {11?}

Worked as usual to day

09\12\{1899} (Tuesday)

Worked as usual in the shop

09\13\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked in the shop to day.

09\14\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked as usual. This evening
Mary and I attended the Grange

09\15\{1899} (Friday)

Worked as usual. This evening
the following members of the Mattatuck
Drum Corps went to Marian{?},
Charles Cass, Clyde Miller and Sam
Squires, Fiffers{Fifers?}, Henry Buckingham,
Bass drummer, Gardener Hall, Irving
Miller, Howard Neil, George Cass,
Charlie Hotchkiss and myself; snare
drummers; we drove to the house of
Mr. Billings Neil, where we formed
and marched, South to the house
of Mr. Bennett Upon{Upson?} and couter-marched{countermarched?}
to the road that runs
to Southington and Cowpounce{?},
then back to Mr. Neils where we
had hot coffee, doughnuts, pie, cake,
apples, grapes, etc, after which we started
home, each wagon carried a torch which
lit up the road, we got home at quarter
to one.

09\16\1899 (Saturday)

Worked as usual. Cousin Marion
Gillette of North Goshen who has been
at Fathers house since last sunday came
to our house to day.

09\17\{1899} (Sunday)

This morning we had breakfast of
stewed oysters, after which we hitched
Jack into th two seated canopy top wagon
and drove Mt Carmel{?}, where had the
horse put out{.?} and left orders to have it
fed and then we, Clyde, Marion Gillette,
Margaret, irving, and I took the trolley
car and went to Light house{2 words?} point,
riding 15 1/2 miles for 20 cts we remineed{remained?}
there till 5 o'clock when we came home
by the same way that we went,
reached home at 9 o clock.
Rev. Mr. Howell preached at Mill Plain{Plan!} Chapel

09\18\{1899} (Monday)

Worked in th shop as usual.

09\19\{1899} (Tuesdayz)

Worked as usual at the Factory of
the international silver company
which is designated{disignated!} as Factory J.

09\20\1899 (Wednesday)

Worked as usual to day.
Received{Recived!} my pay for last weeks work.

09\21\{1899} (Thursday)

Worked as usual today.
{new paragraph?}
This evening mary and I went to
he Grange. The meeting was in
charge of WorthyPomona, who is
Mrs. John Gallagher.

09\22\{1899} (Friday)

This is my wifes birthday 39 years
old, Worked as usual.

The Mattatuck Drum Corps had its
weekly meeting this evening and elected
officers as follows, Charles S Miller, Leader{?}
Charles Cass, assistant leader, Gardner
J Hall,{,?} SEcretary, George Cass, treasurer
and Howard Neil property manager,
{new paragraph?}
To day is also Mrs. Sara H. Hine's
birthday she is 50 years old.

09\23{24!}\1899 (Saturday)

Worked as usual in Rogers Brothers factory,
and as I have not worked at many different
kinds of jobs, I think I can remember what
I have done, First, I forged over a spoon
blanking die for James Byrned, next made
a new drop belt 9" wide for James Claffey,
then ailed{oiled?} the shafting all over the shop,
then turned up a polishing wheel of
sea-horse hide, then went outside and
orked till noon getting out a strump{?}
that had fallen down the bank and
crushed the fence down, next oiled up
the loose pulley about the shop, which
took till 12.30 then ate my dinner, after
which, I went to work at the stumps
and worked till 4.30 when I quit, and
went home, the shop shuts down at
5 o'clock saturday nights, and I work 1/2 hour
as{?} noon, so I get through at 4.30

09\24{25!}\{1899} (Sunday) {Only "Sunday" is written next to this entry}

Stayed{?} about home all the forenoon
except that I went horseback to James Stovells{?}
and paid to him my Mill Plain School tax
which amounted to $6.65, went to the
Mill Plain Chapel, the Reverend{Reverand!} Mr.
Granger of the third Congregational Church
preached, after which Mary and I went out
the Meriden road and back through
East Farms, stopping at mother Pierponts
and made arrangements for me coming
to stay there nights, she stays
there alone and I am afraid that some
one may break into the house and
injure her, a week ago last night
some one stole a lot of chickens from
her.

09\25\{1899} (Monday)

Worked to day as usual.

09\26\1899 (Tuesday)

While{Wh___!} workinga t the shop this forenoon,
at about 10.o'clock I being outside
heard Benedict & Burnhams whistle
blowing for a long time, I went to
the engineer and he went into the
office and they ascertained{asertained!} that all the
whistles in town were blowing in honor
of the arrival{arival!} of Admiral{Admeral!} Dewey, in
New York, Bay the whistling{whistleing?} was kept
up for about an hour, and flags were
run to the tops of the flagstaffs all over
town. The noise reminded me of Lee's
surrender in 1865 only there are more
whistles in Waterbury now than then.

09\27\{1899} (Wednesday)

Worked as usual to day at the
shop. Today is my 41 st birthday.
Mary and I went to the
grange tonight

09\28\1899 (Thursday)

Worked as usual to day.
{new paragraph?}
This evening about 50 members of
the mad River Grange wne to
visit the Watertown Grange, Mary
and her Mother, and mrs. Anne
Hall went with Wilson L. Pierpont{?}.{.?}
and I took Clara French, the Grange
meets in the Town Hall at Watertown
and it is a good place for them.
{new paragraph?}
We furnished the programe{?} with
singing, dramas, and re_itatins{recitations?}
I recited "Songs of the Camp."
{new paragraph?}
We left to come home at 11 o'clock
and We got home and went to
bed at 1 o'clock.

09\29\1899 (Friday)

I worked to day at the factory.

This evening Company's A. and G.
left Waterbury for New Haven
to go to New York to take part in
the Parade which is to be given
in honor of Admiral{Admeral!} Dewey.

09\30\{1899} (Saturday)

Worked as usual to day.
{new paragraph?}
Next monday is to be the town
and City election, and there is
considerable excitement among
the Democrats.

10\01\1899 (Sunday)

I worked about home till eleven o'clock
and then Pierpont{small blank space precedes name}, Irving, Clyde,
margaret,
Ruth and myself, went after nuts, we
first went to a large walnut ree east
of the Doolittle place, where we piacked up
quite a lot of them, from there we went
east{-?} through the Doolittle woods picking
up chestnuts as we went, then into
Wilson Pierponts lot, and to Mrs.
Charles Frosts lot, we got 1 1/2 bushels
of butternuts and a bushel and a half
of walnuts and chestnuts, we found
them to be quite heavy before we
got them home, we balanced{balenced!} the bag
of nuts on a fence-stake{?} and carried
the stake by the ends, one following
the other, got home a little before 5.

Dr. Parry preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.

10\02\1899 (Monday)

Worked as usual to day.
{new paragraph?}
The parade saturday in New York
was ahead of any military parade
ever given in New York then being
over 55.000 men in line, from Connecticut
there went the 1st and 2nd{"nd" is underlined}
2nd{"nd" is underlined} Companys Governors foot
Guards.

The Second Regiment went from
New Haven on the steamer Skinnycook{Shinnycook?},
which broke a paddle wheel
which made them so late tha_{that?}
they only went through half of
the parade.

10\03\1899 (Tuesday)

Worked as usual to day.
{new paragraph?}
Yesterday was election in Waterbury
verything went democratic{demacratic!} in
the town and City except that
eight{exght!} Aldermen were elected.

I did not go to vot as I was very
busy in the shop.

10\04\{1899} (Wednesday)

The weather to day has been very
nice, I have been working out of
door setting window glass about
the shop some of the time, this
evening Clyde, Irving, and I worked
on the stone wall __{we?} are building
East of the house.

Howard Neil called this evening.
{new paragraph?}
I received{recived!} my pay at the shop to
day 13.50

10\05\1899 (Thursday)

Worked to day at Roger & Brother's
Factory, from 7 to 12.30 and from 1 to 5.30
{new paragraph?}
This evening Mary and I attended
the Grange meeting, there was a
class of nine young ladies and
three men taken in. The ladies
were Flora Hitchcock, Miss Wells, Miss
Kellie{?}, Mrs. Eddie, Miss Hurlburt,
Miss Mable Gillette, Miss Laura Gillette,
Miss Lauton{?} and Joanna Lund.
{new paragraph?}
The men were Mr. Eddie, Mr. Fowler,
Mr.{Mrs.?} George Monroe.

=====[end of physical journal book]=====
{The following notes are written on the next page of the
manuscript:
Read by Margaret Miller Northrop Hall
August. 1943,
Read by Ruth Miller Brundage - Jan 1944
" " Frank Pierpont Miller, - March 1944.
" " Raymond H Miller{?} Nov. 19__{1944?}
" " Marian Northrop Kraft Sept. 1988
{Two pages later the following notes are written:
Read by Ruth Miller Brundage
June - 1944}
=====[end of physical journal book]=====
=====[[start of new Journal Book]]=====

10\06\1899 Friday
This morning I got up at quarter past
five o'clock and Irving and I put
things in order in the new building
for the meeting of the "Drum Band"
this evening. Worked all day at
Rogers Brothers factory.
This evening the Drum Band met and
we practiced from 8 to 10 o'clock.
Rogers + Brothers factory commenced
8 hours to day.

10\07\1899 Saturday
Worked in the factory to day as usual.
Margaret and I went to the city
this evening and purchased some
groceries. I also bought two pairs of
overalls at Mears store on East-Main
street for 95 cts.

10\08\{1899} Sunday
This morning I took the wood burning
grate out of the kitchen stove and put
in the coal grate and started a coal
fire, after breakfas {breakfast??}, I mounted the
horse and went to Mr. Farrigus {??}
and had Willie cut my hair for
which I paid him 20 cts. I then went
east over across the gravel dam in
the Reservoir to Ed Holmes and
engaged three barrells of charcoal
then went south to the Meriden
road and by said Meridan road to
the road that took me to East Farms.
I stopped at the cemetery there and met
Mr. John Todd and also mr. Franklin
Todd of Erhart P.O. Medina County
Ohio who formally lived in Wooleult {??}.
Had a nice visit with him.
A serious explosion occured at the
factory of the Seaville Mfg. Co. at about
9.30 o'clock yesterday morning, which
was heard a distance of three miles,
by it 2 men were injured, and the
roofs of the Jafian {??} shop were blown
off, and the windows of all the
buildings near were shattered.
It was caused by an accumulation
of gas in a Jafian {??} oven.
Mr. Rafter of Waterville preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel to day.

10\09\1899 Monday
The weather to day has been very
good except a little damp.
Worked at Rogers Bros. factory, most
of the time putting new pipes at the
springs that supply the water trough
by the side of the street.
I have but little to write about, but
must write something for practice
as it is hard for me to write good, so
I write a little every day.

10\10\{1899} Tuesday
The weather to day has been perfect.
Worked as usual.

10\11\{1899} Wednesday
Worked in the factory. This forenight
was very foggy, but it lifted about
9 o'clock and the weather was fair.
The Wolcott fair was held to day, there
was a large crowd present.
Mary, Margaret, Ruth, Frank, and
Raymond of my family attended.
Wrote J.E. Smith that the Mattatuck Drum
Band would be pleased to play at Lieutenant
Kelloggs reception.

10\12\{1899} Thursday
Worked to day as usual in the
factory most of the time, only
when I worked in the shop yard
building a fire hose house.
Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening. I filled the Lecturers
chair in the place of Arthur Pierpont
who was obliged to stay at home
on account of a sick cow.

10\13\1899 Friday
Worked in the factory as usual
to day.
This evening Margaret and I went
to town and I bought a pair of shoes
of G.W. Minor, for which I paid
2.00.
Mary called to day on Mr. Byam
at his home, and he as one of the
Executive Committee of the Grange
said that Mother might have
the hall to hold Thanksgiving in.
While Mary was visiting, Clyde {??}
went to Ed Holmes and got three
barrels of charcoal for which he is to
pay 1.00.

10\14\{1899} Saturday
Rogers Brothers factory did not run
to day, but I worked cleaning out the
water pipes that run from the steam
pump to the water closets in the making
room.

10\15\1899 Sunday
Sunday is a very warm day for
this time of year. This forenoon I
went over to see George Cass {??}about
getting a Bass Drum head for the
bass drum that Henry Buckingham
uses.
While I was there I signed a joint
note or bond of $150.00. The contracting
parties being Mrs. Grace Cass {??}and
Mr. Huntington and Warner of
Woodbury.
Mr. Garrison preached at Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.

10\16\{1899} Monday
Worked as usual.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Band met at my place.
We expect to turn out in the parade
which is to be given in honor to
Lieutenant Kellogg who is now
on his way home from the Phillipines.
The Colombia beat to day in the
race with the Shamrock (both yats {??})
for the international cup which
has been kept in this country
47 years.
Warren Whitchcock, School com-
mittee for this district called to
night and enumerated the school
children of my family. There were
six of them between the ages of 4
and 16.

10\17\1899 Tuesday
Worked as usual. Mr. C.E. Smith
the secretary of the Committee on
music for the Kellogg day parade
sent me word that they had engaged
ten brass bands to head the ten
division s, and that Drum Corps
could not turn out only as they
went with the orders that participat-
ed in the parade, I then went to
the committee on music of the Brook-
lyn athletic club who had seen me
before, and they had engaged the Sacred
heart Drum Corps. Then I offered
our services to the foresters {??}, and
they gladly accepted the offer.

10\18\1899 Wednesday
Worked as usual in the factory to
day.
One week ago today Mr. David
Porter told me that the deeds
were being drawn, transferring
the 45 acres of land south of the
Plank Road from the heirs of
Timothy Porter to Mrs. David
B. Hamilton who intends to
give it to the City of Waterbury
for a public park. This evening
some of the Drum Band boys
met here and we put a new head
in the Bass drum that Henry
Buckingham uses.

10\19\{1899} Thursday
I worked as usual to day, build-
ing a fence on the North side of
the yard at the factory.
Great preperations {preparations??} are being
made for the parade to be
given in honor of Lieutenant
kellogg tomorrow.
this evening Mary and I attended
the Grange. The fourth degree was
worked on a class of sixteen. The
entertainment programme was in
charge of Miss Gurtrude {Gertrude??} U. Bradley
and she invited all the granges
in this vacinity {vicinity??} and there were
present members from Watertown,
Prospect, Bristol, Whigville,
Cheshire, and Southington. They
numbered about 410 members.
A fine supper was served after
the exercises in the lower hall.
I had a talk with B.J.{??} Hoggett about
getting the Hall for Thanksgiving
Day. Came home and went to bed
at 1.30 A.M. Mrs. Frederick Thomkins
was buried from Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.

10\20\{1899} Friday
This morning I went to work
and staid at the shop till 10 o'clock
when I came home and got ready
to turn out in the Parade that
was given this afternoon.
I met the members of the Mattatuck
Drum Corps at 1 o'clock at Spensers
feed store and we went from there
to a hall on Bank Street, where we
met the American Lodge of Foresters
for whom we played.
We turned out 14 pieces, they were
Charles Cass, Clyde Miller, Harry
Buckingham, and Luke Henderson,
piffers{??}, Henry Buckingham, and
Elgie Bronson, Bas Drummers,
arthur Harrison, George Cass,
Irving Miller, George Atkinson,
Howard Neil, Charles Hotchkiss,
Miles Booth, and myself, Snare
Drummers.
The division to which we were
attached which was the 9th formed
on Central Avenue and we started
on the march at 15 minutes past 2
and passed through Church Street to
Grand, then to Bank to Exchange Place
and down South Main to Washington
and to Brooklyn and then up Bank
to Grand, down Grand to Union to
Mill up Mill to East Main to Dublin
and countermarched to Center Square
then up North Main to Grove to Prospect
down Prospect to the center out West Main
to Central Ave. up Central Ave. to Hillside
Ave. to North Willow to West Main
to the North side of the green to East
side of Green to South side of green
where we passed the reviewing stand
which was in the form of a gun-
boat on which was Lieutenant Kellogg
of the Navy, the City officers, His
Excellency the Govoner {Governor??} of Connecticut
Launsbury{??{ by name, and his staff,
and many other men of note,
often passing the Gunboat we marched
up Church Street to Grand to Bank,
and into the Foresters Hall where we were
dismissed.
There were about 3000 men in line with
10 Brass bands and several Drum bands.
I think it is safe to say that we attracted
as much attention as any of the organizations
although we looked rough and had no
uniforms.
This evenings american which generally
ridicules the Mattatuck Drum Band
had the following.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps attracted a
lot of attention. Their specialty seems to
be in making noise and in it they
excelled. The drums, which looked like
small barrels, gave out a hollow sound,
deafening to the ears but effective,
in as much as they drew the attention
of the spectators.

10\21\1899 Saturday
Worked as usual at the factory. The
Mill did not run.
The weather is growing colder.

10\22\{1899} Sunday
Weather very cold this morning.
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
There was a large attendance. The Rev.
Mr. Davenport preached.

10\23\{1899} Monday
The weather to day has been very warm.
Worked as usual in the factory.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met this
evening and practiced.

10\24\1899 Tuesday
Worked as usual to day.
The leaves have fallen from the trees
and the woods are on fire in many
directions to day.

10\25\1899 Wednesday
Worked as usual to day.
This evening all of my family and I
went to the Mill Plain Chapel to
the supper and entertainment which
was given by the Ladies Union.
This was the first supper this fall
and was well attended. The price of
the supper was 15 cts and they made
9.00. The entertainment was very good.

10\26\{1899} Thursday
Worked as usual to day.
It is now certain that Mr. D.B.
Hamilton owns the land that is to
be given to the City for a Public
Park to be known as Hamilton
Park in honor of Capt. D.B. Hamilton.
Mrs. Hamilton was out looking at
the land to day. The grange let
Mary hire their Hall for Thanksgiving
day for $10.00.

10\27\{1899} Friday
Worked as usual to day. The weather
has been very warm. This is a
dry fall. Many of the wells are dry
and the streams are low. Went to {bed??}
early this evening at about 8.30
o'clock.

10\28\{1899} Saturday
Worked as usual to day, got through
at 4.30 came home and laid well till
after dark, when we ate our supper after
which Clyde, Irving, Mary, and myself
went to the new building and cut
up cabbages for sour-crout till nine
o'clock, it rained a little this evening.

10\29\{1899} Sunday
This day is Sunday, but alas I
have spent it in working in the
shop. A shafting got out of line
as was running dangerously, so
Laurence Tobirl{??}, Fritz Snowman
and myself went to work at nine
this morning and worked all day
repairing it, but only got it about
half done at night, it will run
however but not right.
The weather to day has been dull
with a little rain, but tonight it
looks as if it were coming off colder.
Dr. Anderson preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.

10\30\1899 Monday
Worked in the factory today, did
not get through till 6.30 as I stayed
to put in a lot of taper keys in
the spur wheel on the Waterwheel
shaft.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met
and practiced this evening.
Quite a number of young ladies
came to hear the music and
have fun with the boys.

10\31\{1899} Tuesday
Worked as usual in the factory.
The weather has been wet all
day. Went to see Mrs. Annie Hall
about the Grange Records this
evening. Stopped at John Frenches
on my way home. Mrs. John French
told this evening that Lauren Carter had
foreclosed the mortgage on Thomas Melbournes{??} place.

11\01\1899 Wednesday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
The news papers state today
that the Boers of South africa who
are at war with England have
captured 2000 British troops to-
gether with a large baggage train
and battery of cannon.
Went to see Mrs. Hall again tonight
last night I walked but tonight I
road {rode??} horse back.

11\02\{1899) Thursday
Worked to day as usual in the
factory. Last night as Mary
and I were about to retire for the
night, she called my attention
to a great light in the South-east
in the Naugatuck valley. The
heavens were all lit up and the
fire seemed to extend a great
distance and looked like a great
forest fire. This morning I
learned that it was the greatest
fire that had ever visited Waterbury.
Nine dwelling houses and two
tenement blocks being b urned
to the ground in Simonsville.
The fire swept up Stony Hill
from near South Main Street
to chapel Street and burned out
21 families and rendered 82 persons
homeless.
Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening. Mary payed 5.00
to the Secretary towards paying
for the hall for Thanksgiving
day.

11\03\1899 Friday
Worked as usual in the factory
to day.

11\04\{1899} Saturday
Worked as usual to day, among
other things I have helped place
the boundry stones on the
line between Rogers + Brothers
property and the land Mrs.
Hamilton has bought for a
City Park.

11\05\{1899} Sunday
After breakfast this morning
we hitched Jack into the two seat
wagon and Irving, Margaret,
Ruth, and I went first to Simons-
ville and saw where the great fire
last Wednesday night burned
ten houses and two blocks.
From there we went through
Naugatuck to Betheny and
over to Prospect and then home
where we arrived at 5 o'clock, we
found Henry Buckingham there.
He had come to copy some fife
tunes, which he did, and Clyde
and I made out the monthly report
of the Mattatuck Drum Corps.
Dr. Parry preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel.

11\06\1899 Monday
I worked as usual to day.
This evening the Mattatuck
Drum Corps met for practice.
The monthly reports were read.

11\07\1899 Tuesday
I got up at 5.30 o'clock had breakfast
of bacon and eggs after which I went
to work at Rogers Bros. factory
where I spent the day in working
at many different jobs.

11\08\{1899} Wednesday
Worked to day as usual. The weather
to day has been very nice.
This evening we went to the Chapel
to the supper furnished by the Ladies
Union, they realized about 8.00.

11\09\{1899} Thursday
Worked to day as usual.
This forenoon George Partrel came
to the shop to see me about the
Mattatuck Drum Band going
to Litchfield to play tomorrow
in honor of the return of Captain
Calvocoresses{??} of the United States
Navy. At noon I sent word around
by Clyde and George Cass{??} to
different men, and at evening
I went to Wolcott and saw Luke
Anderson and Adelbert Norton
about going.

11\10\1899 Friday
Got up at 5 o'clock. Clyde and I went to
Rogers Brothers factory where we oiled up
the shafting, after which we returned home
and ate breakfast, then we hitched the
horse into the business wagon and
loaded in five drums and Clyde, Irving
and I drove to Ozera's {??} Dunworth's livery
stable where the Mattatuck Drum Corps
loaded into his big bus and we started
for Litchfield where we arrived at 12:30
o'clock. We went to Mr. Seth Pratts' stable
and had dinner near by at a resterant
after which we formed and marched to
the center of the West Park where played
several pieces, after which we took our
place in the line which was forming.
The parde {parade??} first marched to East Street
where we halted with the right resting on
South Street and formed in two lines
one on each side of the street after which
Lieutenant Commander Colvacoresses{??} of
the United States Navy was driven through
the line everybody saluting, after which
we marched down South Street and across
to meadow, up meadow to West Street then
to North to the residence of the late Dr.
Buill{??} where we counter-marched to the center
where we passed in review, before the
Grand Stand after which we listened to
remarks by the honorable George Woodworth,
this was followed by an address by United
States Senetor{Senator??} Platt after which the Honorable
J. Demings Perkins made an address and
oresented Commander Colvacoresses{??} with
a sword which was given in behalf of the
town of Litchfield. Colvoresses{??} replied in
a fine speech in which he said that he
did not deserve the honor that the people
were giving him, that he had tried to
do his duty as a good American officer
should, that circumstances took him to
Manilla Bay, and that by honoring him
that they were honoring the branch of the
service to which he is attached, the Navy.
He was followed by State Senetor{Senator??}
Pratt{??} after which all proceeded to the West
end of the East Park where Colvocoresses{??}
set out an oak tree, to be known as the
Colvocaresses{??} oak, after this the parade was
dismissed and we returned home which
we reached at about 8:30 o'clock. Colvocoresses{??}
was Capt. of the battleship Concord at the battle of
Manilla Bay.

11\11\1899 Saturday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
it has rained most of the time to day and
this evening it is cooler.

11\12\1899 Sunday
Went to the shop at 9 and worked till
12 o'clock in the Waterwheel could not do it
at any other time as the Mill is running.
This afternoon went to the Chapel and
heard the Rev. Mr. Rafter preach.

11\13\1899 Monday
Worked as usual to day, after dinner I
went to town to get the check cashed that
the Mattatuck Drum Band received for
playing at Litchfield, wrode {rode??} in on the
trolley car, went first to the Citizens National
Bank but Mr. Curtis the cashier would
not cash it as I did not know anyone
there except himself, so I went to the
Manufacturers Bank and they cashed
it for me, got back to the shop at 2 o'clock.
This evening the Drum Band met at my
place and practiced. Those of the boys
that were present that went to Litchfield
were paid 2.00 the amount due them.
The weather was very cold.

11\14\{1899} Tuesday
Worked as usual to day. It began
snowing about 5 o'clock this evening
and now at 9:30 there is about 1 1/2 inches
on the ground.

11\15\{1899} Wednesday
This morning the snow lay on the ground
two inches deep, the weather changed
to fog this afternoon and part of the
snow melted. The grange fair opened
this evening. Mary, Clyde, and Margaret
have gone.

11\16\1899 Thursday
I worked as usual to day in the factory.
Pierpoul and Irving drove the horse. When I went to
work, we went in on the old Cheshire road
till we got a little West of the new City
line which crosses the road just East
of my shop and there turned South
to the Plank road and West along
Plank road to a pair of bars beyond
the residence of Fred Tompkins where
I got out and walked across the new
park property to the shop.
The first work I did was to oil all of
the main shafts in the shop, then
pointed up a brick furnice {furnace??} that I
built in the yard yesterday, then
worked at blacksmithing a spell,
then set windowglass till noon,
\and then shortened a large belt
and axled up the countershafts for
the rools {??} then ate dinner.
After which I helped rig up a heat-
guage{gauge??} on the muffle {??} and then
forged a large leaver {lever??} for a power
press, then repaired a driving
belt for a large drop, after which I
put in a window glass, and it was
time to stop work 5:30.
Mary, Clyde, and Keith, and Pierpoul
went to the grange fair tonight.

11\17\1899 Friday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening I went to Mr. Adelbert
Nortons in Woodealt {??} and paid him
the 2.00 due him from the Mattatuck
Drum Band. I also engaged a hog of
his to be butchered at about Christ-
mas time, came home very fast
as I was {on??} horseback.
St. Joseph's Roman Catholic cemetery
on Dublin Street was dedicated in
Oct. 1858. The first person buried
there was a young man named
Pierce Rice, who lived on Williams Street.
The first burial in the Calvary K.C.{??}
Cemetery was a child of P.J. Bolans who
was buried in July 1892. The first
person buried in the new St. Joseph's
Cemetery on Dublin Street was
the wife of John J. McDonald who
was buried 1898.
A remarkable fact is that Mr. Patric
Boylan dug the first Graves in each
of the Dublin Street Cemetary's.

11\18\1899 Saturday
Worked as usual to day. When I came
home from the shop tonight, stopped
at my shop and got some coats, vests
hats and other things that belonged
to the Drum Band. We, Irving, Pierpont{??}
and I went to town and bought 1gt{??} of
oysters and 2 lbs of crackers for .50 cts.
We also bought a small blank book for .05 cts.
and a pound of butter for .20 cts.

11\19\{1899} Sunday
Went to Father's this forenoon to
see him about getting the City to
put a fire hydrant near my
shop. Went to the Chapel this
afternoon, Rev. Mr. Hannon preached.
Also went to Father's this evening.
Brother Frank and his wife were
there, also Will Gillette and Ira.

11\20\1899 Monday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met
at my place this evening for practice.
Miles Booth, who is a trolley car
conductor, came and invited the
members to play next Friday
evening to advertise a socible {sociable??}
that is to be given by the Motor-
Men and Conductors. Quite a
number of the boys are going.

11\21\{1899} Tuesday
Worked to day as usual.
Morris Alcott showed me to day a written
invitation which he had received to the
wedding of Charles Monroe and Mrs.
George Downs, which is to take place
in Bristol Dec. 8th.

11\22\1899 Wednesday
Worked as usual. Received my last
weeks pay 13.50.
Hear to day that Arthur Blewett who
works for David J. Porter was taken to
the hospital yesterday sick with the
typhoid fever. He is a nice young man
and his home is in Vermont.
Sixteen years ago at seven o'clock in
the morning on Nov 22nd 1883 Mary A.
Pierpont and I were married in Mill
Plain Chapel by the Rev. Mr. Micon
who was then pastor of Trinity Church.
We went to Boston on our wedding trip
where we staid {stayed??} several days, and returning
set up housekeeping in the chambers of
mother Pierpont's house at East Farms.
This evening my whole family
except Clyde went to the supper
at the Mill Plain Chapel, given
by the Ladies Union, they cleared
about $11.00.

11\23\1899 Thursday
Worked to day repairing the governor on
the waterwheel at the factory.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange. The Lecturers' hour was in
charge of the Watertown grange, and
there were present about 70 visitors.
Mrs. John McCoy who lives in the
next house East became the mother
of a child this noon.
A family named Lawton has moved
into the new house next South of Ervis
E. Wright's.

11\24\{1899} Friday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening most of the members of
the Mattatuck Drum Corps and several
of the old members turned out in the
center to advertise the dance which
was given by the Conductors and
Motormen of the trolley line. We here
at home could hear the drumming
very plain.

11\25\1899 Saturday
This day I worked as usual till 4:30 o'clock.
Clyde went to town this morning and
bought 13 bushels of charcoal for which he
paid 10 cts. per bushel, also 92 pounds of bailed {baled??}
hay for 90 cts. also 1 bag of oats for 1.15.

11\26\{1899} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
rev. Dr. Davenport preached.
This evening I wrode {rode??} horseback up
to the Red Bridges and across the mad
river and down the Woodtick and
Meriden road to Father's, there I met
Miss May Goldsmith and Mira Somers.
William Gillette and Brother Frank
was there also, his wife and her sister
Mrs. Fanny Rumans from British
Columbia. Soon I came home.
A man by the name of Michael
Murphy was found dead this
morning in the old clay hole South
of the Plank Road, west of the
Brass Mill road. He had a bottle
with him and to appearances had
been drinking. He lived in Brooklin.

11\27\{1899} Monday
Worked as usual to day. The Matta-
tuck Drum Band met for practice this
evening.
Harry Kilbourn called and said that
he could not act as janitor for Thanks-
giving at the Grange Hall only to
open and close it.

11\28\{1899} Tuesday
Worked as usual.
Mary went to see Mother about
getting someone to wash dishes
Thanksgiving. They talked of Mrs.
Hesphelt and Mary stayed to
see her. She said that she thought
that she could. I drove down
horseback and told Mother, at
which she seemed much pleased.

11\29\{1899} Wednesday
Worked as usual to day.

11\30\1899 Thursday
To day is Thanksgiving. This morning
I took a load of water in milk cans
to the Grange Hall, got there before
nine o'clock. I then took two loads
of water, vituals {victuals??} and crockery, and
got the hall ready. The Summers
family met there to the number
of fifty, had a very nice dinner
also a very good literary entertain-
ment and in the evening ice cream.
All seemed to enjoy it very much and
we left for home about 9:30.

12\01\{1899} Friday
Worked as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to
the grange.

12\02\{1899} Saturday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
After work Irving came to the shop
with the big wagon and I sent him
home, and then I went to Laurence
Tobins and got an organ which I
had agreed to buy and started home.
At the New St. Joseph's Cemetery
I met Clyde who was coming to meet
me. We drove home and left the organ
on the wagon which we ran down in
the swamp. We then ate supper, after
which Clyde and I went to the factory
and we shortened the main belt on the
little engine which was 18 inches wide.
It took 1 1/2 hours, then we went to town
and purchased some groceries after which
we came home. We then unloaded the
organ as all of the little ones were in bed
and put it in the front room, where
we intend to keep it till Christmas
and then give it to the girls.

12\03\1899 Sunday
This forenoon I stayed about home.
Went to the Chapel the afternoon and
heard Mr. Parry of the Grand Street
Baptist Church preach an excellent sermon.
Came home and took a horse back ride
to see Daniel Squires but he was not
home. The fire alarm gong has sounded
twice to day, this forenoon for a fire
near the corner of Bank and Grand Street
and this afternoon for a fire near the corner
of Franklin and Union Square.

12\04\{1899} Monday
Worked to day in the factory.
It is now half past ten o'clock and
I am tired, but it seems as if I had
left undone something if I go to sleep
and do not write in this book, this
is I suppose owing to habit.
The fire gong blew an alarm at 5:30
this afternoon for Exchange Place.
Mr. Byars who has charge of the
burnising {??} machine department saw
me to day and wanted to see Clara
French about giving her a job at
work. I told him where he could
find her at Scovills factory, and he
went to see her. She called this
evening and told me to tell him
that she would go to work Wednesday.
The drum Corps met for practice
this evening. Henry Buckingham was
44 years old to day.

12\05\1899 Tuesday
Worked to day as usual.
The Boers of South Africa are supris-
ing the whole world by their deeds.
They have driven the British into
the Orange free Stautes {??} and into
Natal{??}, notwithstanding that the
British have an army of 100,000 men
at Mooder river. 4,000 Boers were
met by 10,000 British which they
held in check for 10 hours killing
1,000 of their number.
This evening I went to see Daniel
Squares about going to the grange
next Thursday evening, and
from there to the shop where I
worked 1 hour laising{??} a heavy
belt.

12\06\{1899} Wednesday
2nd Snow
Worked as usual to day.
Received my last weeks pay 11.59.
The snow fell deep enough to cover
the ground.
There was a supper at the Chapel
this evening.

12\07\{1899} Thursday
Worked as usual.
The grange met to night. They took
no nitice of my appeal to the grange
in regard to paying the 5.00 which\
I paid last Saturday for the use
of the hall Thanksgiving day.

12\08\1899 Friday
3rd Snow
Worked as usual to day.
Snow which had fallen during
the night lay on the ground this
morning to the depth of 1 1/2 inches.
It had nearly all gone this evening.

12\09\1899 Saturday.
Worked as usual to day in the
factory.
Mr. Charles Monroe and Mrs. Emma
Downes were married in Bristol last
Wednesday evening.

12\10\1899 Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Rev. Mr. Rafter of the Waterville
Episcopal Church preached.

12\11{1899} Monday
Worked as usual to day in the factory
of Rogers & Brother.

12\12\{1899} Tuesday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to
visit Mr. Robert Worden at East Farms.

12\13\1899 Wednesday
Worked as usual to day.
It rained nearly all day yesterday,
which is the first rain we have had in
weeks, nearly all of the wells in this
section are very low or dry,
and the streams are lower than they
have been known to be in years.

12\14\{1899} Thursday
Worked as usual in the factory to
day. This evening Mary and I
went to the Grange. It was the elec-
tion of officers and B.F. Hoggett was
elected, Master; Harry Coe, Overseer;
Mrs. Warren B. Hitchcock, Lecturer;
Warren B. Hitchcock, Steward;
the meeting then closed at 10:30.
J.J. Byam died last night at 11:30
o'clock of Brights disease after an illness
of many months, he lived on Cherry
Farm south of the Meriden road
opposite Shelton Hitchcock's.

12\15\1899 Friday
Worked as usual to day. The weather
to day has been wet especially this
forenoon. Saw Morris Alcott about
getting an entertainment for the
Chapel supper next Wednesday
night. he was about to give it up
when I encouraged him a little
and did a little planning by which
we soon had quite a programme
planned and he is going to Water-
ville to night to see about it.
This evening I went to see Robert
Worden about entertainment at
the Chapel, went horse-back and
got home about 7:30 o'clock.

12\16\1899 Saturday
Worked as usual to day. The factory
is going to shut down to night till
after January 1st. Morris Alcott
went to Waterville las night and
saw Mr. Rafter about the entertainment
at the Chapel. He will come and read
and recite, also he will bring a piano
player and another talented young
lady. There are 13 young ladies
who are practiced in a broom drill,
who Mr. Rafter thinks will come
and he was to let Morris know to
day but he did not, so I went to
Waterville to night to see about it.
I wrode {rode??} my horse, after work found
Harry West who had charge of the
drill and he saw some of the young
ladies and they were all anxious
to come, so I came home stopping
at Morris Alcott's house and letting
him {know??} that they were coming and
also at Warren Hitchcock's, but he
was not at home.
News has been received to day of a
great battle that was fought a few
days ago between the Boers of South
Africa and the Brotish army of
60,000 men under General Briller in
which the latter army was routed
with great loss which included 11
cannons. The Boers are surprising
the world by their acts and bravery.
They have not yet been beaten in
a battle in this war.

12\17\1899 Sunday
The weather to day has been cold
and stormy.
Mr. J.J. Byam was buried from
the Mill Plain Chapel this
afternoon, there were present about
250 persons, a number of which were
of the order of Woodmen, and many
Grangers also were present, the
Rev. Mr. Waters of Woolcott{??} officiated
and also the Grange buryal{burial??} service
was used.
After the funeral I saw Warren
Hitchcock about the entertainment
at the Chapel next Wednesday evening
when I got home Irving gave me a dollar
which Mr. Worden had left to have an
advertisdement put in the newspaper
tomorrow, but as Warren Hitchcock
had already said that he was going
to attend to it, I carried the money
and gave it to Mrs. Munson. I then
wrode {rode??} out the Meriden road to
East Farms to see Mr. Worden, staid {stayed??}
there about 1 1/2 hours then came
home and ate supper of baked spair {spare??}
rib.

12\18\1899 Monday
Worked to day as usual in Rogers
Brothers factory.
The drum corps had a meeting this
evening.
Old Robert Hotchkiss, a veteran of
the 20th Comm.{??} in the war of the
Rebellion was there and he told of
some of his experiences as a soldier
at the battles of Chanslorville,
Bullrun, Gettysburg, Chatanooga,
Peach-tree Creek, Atlanta, Savannah,
and other places, which very much
interested the boys.

12\19\1899 Tuesday
Worked as usual to day.

12\20\{1899} Wednesday
Worked as usual to day.
The Ladies Union had a supper and
entertainment at the Chapel this
evening, the supper was furnished by
Mrs. Elmer Hitchcock, Mrs. Worden,
Mrs. Milan Northrop, my wife and
I think Mrs. Annie Munson.
The entertainment consisted of
a piano solo by Inez Bethweth,
a drill by thirteen young ladies of
Waterville who represented different
nations by their flags and dress,
a violin solo by Miss Dechand of
Cherry Street, a piano solo by
Miss Barker of Waterville, and
readings by Rev. Mr. Rafter of
Watervilee, the supper realized 7.00.

12\21\{1899} Thursday
Worked as usual. This evening
Robert Worden and I went to see
Mr. Davenport about a letter he
sent me about the old trouble at
the Mill Plain Chapel being re-
vived in regard to the piano which
was bought two years ago.
I have heard nothing about it
except that Warren Hitchcock
told Mr. Worden that Mr. Tucker
showed him a lot of papers, and
told him that I was to blame for
the whold thing.

12\22\1899 Friday
Worked as usual. This is the short-
est day of the year.
To day I went to town and had the
check of 15.00 cashed at the Fourth
National Bank, and this evening
paid it to Mrs. Hine.

12\23\{1899} Saturday
Worked as usual to day, the weather
for the last week has been very warm,
the ground has hardly been frozen
more than two days at a time so far.
This evening I went to the Chapel and
helped trim it up for Christmas. There
were but few people present, got home at
about 10 o'clock. Rob Hotchkiss came to
day and salted down the pork.

12\24\1899 Sunday
A snow storm set in from the North
East this morning which turned into
rain, and has continued to rain hard
all day, but has now at 9 o'clock cleared
up. Ruth and I went to the Chapel this
afternoon, there were but few there as it
rained hard and they had no service.
We walked home in the rain, accompany-
ing Miss Agness Able as far as her
home.

12\25\{1899} Monday
This day is Christmas and we were up
before six o'clock, and the children were
at their stockings which were filled with
little presents. Margaret and Ruth together
had the organ which I bought of Laurel
Tobin. They seemed to enjoy it very
much, after breakfast Clyde went to
East Farms to Grandma Pierpont's
with some little presents, and she sent
over some sheets and holders that
she had made herself, only Clyde
lost the holders. I jumped upon the
horse's back and wrode {rode??} back and found
the holders in front of the place where
the old Baxter barn used to stand
beyond the horse brook.
After coming back I rode to Father's
and carried down a bag of apples
after which I went over to George
Casses {Cass'??} where I stayed a while.
At noon we went to Father's where
all of our family were present except
Brother Fred and his wife who are
in Detroit, Mich. We had dinner at
about 1:30 after which we went upon
Crow Mountain where there is a
lot of valuable wood land which is
about to be cut off as many of
the brass mills are about to give
up burning oil and are going to
burn wood again for annealing.
In the evening we had a Christmas
tree which was enjoyed by the little
children as well as by the old folks.
at about 9 o'clock we left for our several
homes.
Mr. Stephen Harrison died this morn-
ing of heart disease, his wife is first
cousin to my mother.

12\26\{1899} Tuesday
Worked as usual. This evening
Mary and I and the children went
to the Chapel to the Sunday school
Christmas entertainment, there was
a good attendence {attendance??} the Chapel was well
filled.

12\27\1899 Wednesday
Worked in the factory as usual putting
up timber-work for a new shaft.
Received my last week's pay 13.50.
Mr. Byers also gave me Clara French's
pay, which I carried up to her this evening.

12\28\1899 Thursday
Worked as usual in the factory to day.
Mary and I went to the Grange this
evening, there was a small attendence{attendance??}
present, about 28.

12\29\{1899} Friday
Worked as usual. The weather to day
has been very cold, below the freezing
poing, skating is very nice, and the
boys enjoy it very much up on
Frost's pond.

12\30\1899 Saturday
Worked as usual to day.
The weather has been cold all
day.

12\31\{1899} Sunday
Very cold weather to day.
Miss Sophia Johnson was buried
from the Chapel at one o'clock to
day, she was a Swede{??} girl 28 years old
who worked at one time for David
G. Porter.
Dr. Davenport preached at the Chapel this
afternoon.


[[to be continued]]

The Journals of Charles Somers Miller [file #2]

Transcribed and edited under the direction of Robert A. Kraft, his great grandson;
Copyright 1995 [latest modifications and corrections, 01ap2004]

1900

1\01\1900 {Monday}
This is the first day of the
New Year and is the beginning
of another century.
In years gone by I have known
several persons who was {were??} born
during the year 1800 and I used
to wonder if they would any of
them live to see 1900 they are
all dead. John Abix who was the
oldest died in 1893.
I have known many persons who
were born previous to 1800 and
17 years ago at a forth {fourth??} of July
celebration in New York I met
a man 103 years old who had
seen and talked with General
George Washington.
I have spent all of this day about
home, the weather has been
cold and it snowed till about
two o'clock, and there is about
5 inches now on the ground
which has fallen to day.

1\02\1900 {Tuesday}
Worked to day as usual in Rogers
& Brother spoon factory at Mill
Wright work.
This day has been rather cold.
I walked to the shop this morning
as the horse was very smooth and
I was afraid that it would slip
on the snow.
But to night Irving came after me
as he had had the horse shod at
my shop for which they charged
1.25.

1\03\{1900} Wednesday
Worked as usual to day.
This evening we, Mary, Clyde,
Irving and myself went to the
Chapel to the supper and entertain-
ment. There was a good attendence {attendance??}
and the entertainment was very
good. When we came home the
thermometer was six degrees below
zero.

1\04\1900 Thursday
Worked as usual to day.
This has been the coldest day of the
season so far, the thermometer stood
at ten degrees below zero.

1\05\{1900} Friday
Worked as usual. The streams are
very low and wells are now dry
that have stood the drouth {drought??} of the
fall.
This evening Mr. and Mrs. Able,
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Spender, Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Alcott, Mr. and
Mrs. Warren Hitchcock, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Worden, and two of
the Worden boys met at our house
to make arrangements for the coming
fair which is to be given at the
Chapel next month.

1\06\1900 Saturday
Worked as usual.
Got out of the shop at 4:30 and came
home and set two large window
glass{glasses??} and also one glass in the door
of the big clock.

1\07\1900 Sunday
The weather to day has been very
nice and not very cold.
This afternoon we went to the Chapel
the Rev. Mr. Buckley preached, after
Chapel I went horseback out to
Arthur Pierpont's and ordered a load
of wood for the Chapel, after return-
ing ate supper of roast spairrib{spare rib??}
after which Mary and I went down
to Father's and stayed till eleven
o'clock when we came home it
was raining and the road was
rather slippery.

1\08\{1900} Monday
Worked to day as usual.
This morning it rained quite
hard and was very slippery,
but to night it had come off
cold and it froze quite hard.
We had a drum band meeting
this evening which was well attended.

1\09\1900 Tuesday
Worked in the factory as usual.
We drew the water out of the ditch to day
at the shop to repair the gates and con-
denser strainer, and the boys caught
a number of pickeral {??}.
The ice men are getting in their ice
at the Brass Mill Pond Hall and Upson
are operating. Th City Ice Company
are filling their houses at Wedges pond.
Ed Pritchard is filling his houses at
the upper pond at Wedges place, and
the Mill Plain Ice Company are filling
their houses.
This evening sister Iva and William
Gillette called and made us a visit.

1\10\{1900} Wednesday
Worked in the factory as usual to
day. I am not feeling well as I
have a cold coming on, as has
many others. It seems as if
everybody had colds now.

1\11\1900 Thursday
Worked in the factory putting
a new main shaft and friction
clutch so as to connect the small
engine and waterwheel together
without stopping the power.
Weather has been cold to day
and it began hailing at 5:30
o'clock, when I went to bed at 10
it was about 3 inches deep on
the ground.
We have received news that the
town of Ladysmith in South
Africa which is beseiged by the
Boers cannot hold out much
longer and that General White
and his 10,000 British troops will
have to surrender.
General Roberts who the British
Government has appointed com-
mander-in-chief of the forces
in South Africa has landed at
Cape-Town last Tuesday and
a reenforcement {reinforcement??} of 50,000 troops
are on their way to join him,
which all togather {together??} will make a
British force of 225,000 men sent
to South Africa, which is the bigest {biggest??}
army which the British have ever
put in the field.
Great things are expected of General
Roberts, as were of General White
and General Buller, both of which
have been defeated.

1\12\1900 Friday
Worked to day as usual in
the factory.
This evening I went to see the
Rev. Mr. Davenport about Chapel
matters, he was very plesant {pleasant??}, but
somewhat in a hurry as there
was going to be a business meeting
on his church at 8 o'clock.
At 7:30 I went and called on Captain
James Croft who is staying with
his brother Fred at No. 48 Holmes
avenue, he has been with the
army in the Phillapine {Philipine??} Islands
for the past year, and has
taken part in all of the principle
battles. He showed me many {refecks??}
in the shape of Japanese and Spanish
swords, canes, ctc. also many pictures
of places where he had been. He expects
to start for Montania {Montana??} on the 22nd of
this month. I had a nice visit and
enjoyed it very much, as I had not
seen him in 13 years.

1\13\1900 Saturday
Worked as usual in the factory.
This evening Irving, who came
with the team after me to the
shop, and I went to town to have
an advertisement put in the
American, for the supper and
entertainment to be given at
the Mill Plain Chapel next
Wednesday evening, we also
went to Mark's store on south
Main st. and bought a pain {pane??} of
glass 11x24 for which we paid
22 cts.

1\14\1900 Sunday
Got up this morning at 8:30 built the
kitchen fire, by first laying in a hod
of charcoal then wet it with kersene
oil and lit it after which I put on the
hard coal then I went to riddlering{??}
the ashes, after which breakfast was
ready, which was stewed oysters, after
eating we went to the barn and did
the chores, after which Irving and I
repaired the dam which was leaking.
We then sat in the house until it was
time to get ready for the Chapel which
we attended there was a goodly number
present, Rev. D. Parry preached.
After we got home from the Chapel
Clyde and I hitched the horse into the
sleigh and drove to Woodtick to Cousil
David Frisbie to see him about smok-
ing some hams, it snowed hard
while we were going but stopped
while we were there, while there
Frank and Burt came with the
school teacher, a Miss Britter who
they were fooling with.
We then went to Mr. John Todd's
to see if Mrs. Todd would read at the
Chapel next Wednesday night at the
entertainment, she said that she
would, we staid {stayed??} there till after nine
o'clock when we came home where we
arrived at 10:30.

1\15\1900 Monday
Worked as usual to day in the
factory. Sleighing very good, bus
is getting thin.
Hod drum corps meeting tonight.
Weather has been very nice and
not very cold.

1\16\1900 Tuesday
Worked to day in the factory.
This evening Mary and I went
to Mr. John Todd's and carried
five reading books which we left
for Mrs. Todd to look over, we also
went to Mr. J.H. Garrigus and
I had Willie cut my hair and
Mary sold Bessie a cupon {coupon??} for a
silk skirt.

1\17\1900 Wednesday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening we went to the Chapel
to the supper and entertainment
there were about 95 present and
the entertainment was good, it
consisted of a Recitation by Ruth
Todd, a Duett {Duet??} by Inez Beckwith
and Miss Wheeler, a violin solo by
Master Tompkins who is 11 years old,
reading by Mrs. J.R.S. Tood {??}, violin
duett {duet??} by the Master's Thompkins,
Piano and Mandolin by Miss
Edith Burrell and her brother.

1\18\{1900} Thursday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went
to the Grange. They installed the
new Officers and had a supper
but as it was late we came home.

1\19\{1900} Friday
Worked as usual. This morning
it was very foggy so much so
that when I went to work we
could not see one telephone pole
from the other and it has remain-
ed foggy nearly all day.
In the fog this morning two
electric cars on the Naugatuck
line crashed into each other below
Hopeville, both cars were badly
smashed and one man badly
injured as were several passenger
more or less injured one of the
cars was in charge of William
Kilbourn conductor.

1\20\1900 Saturday
Worked as usual in the factory,
got out at 4:30 and came home and
cut wood till dark.

1\21\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Rev. Mr. Hannon preached there was
a large attendence {attendance??}.
Mr. Agustus Mashier is very sick.

1\22\1900 Monday
Worked in the factory to day, stoped {stopped??}
at five o'clock and went to the American
Office and had the following advertisement
put in the paper for tomorrow evening
Mill Plain Chapel, Lecture, given by
Rev. Dr. F.J. Parry. Subject, The Mirthful
Side of Life. Wednesday evening
Jan 24th 1900. admission 15 cts. children .10
Rogers and Brother factory resumed
work to day after a shut down of
about 4 weeks, starting on 8 hours
time.
Had a drum corps meeting this
evening.

1\23\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day as usual. The weather
to day has been warm and nice.
Mr. Nelson Ovaitt [Oviatt] of Portland
Orogon {Oregon??} visited the factory to day
he was until 8 years ago bookeeper
there, also he was a member of the
Mattatuck Drum Band.

1\24\1900 Wednesday
Worked a {as??} usual.
Mr. Frank Allen's wife died yesterday
aged 43 years. They live on East Moun-
tain, over the line in Prospect.
News has been received to day that
General Buller with a force of 50,000
British has been defeated near the
Tuglla {??} river in South Africa
by the Boers. He was on the way
to release General White at Lady-
smith who is beseaged {besieged??}. This defeat
will I think be the turning point
of the war.
There was a Lecture this evening
at the Mill Plain Chapel, by the
Rev. Dr. T.J. Parry Subject, "The
Mirthful Side of Life." The chapel
was well filled and the lecture
good. Received 13.08 and there is
more yet to come.

1\25\{1900} Thursday
Worked in the factory to day.
Weather wet and cold, to night it
was very foggy. Mary and I went to
wrode {rode??} up to the hall with Wilson
L. Pierpont, it was very dark.

1\26\{1900} Friday
Worked in the factory to day.
The weather is very cold and windy.
The papers to day says there is great
rejoicing in England because General
Warren who commands the leftof
General Buller's army has captured
"Spion Nop" {??} a hill that commands
the reagon {region??} all about.

1\27\1900 Saturday
Worked in the factory to day.
Last night was very windy and
cold, as has been today.
News has come to day that when
General Warren captured Spion
Nop {??} with a force of 4,000 men he
found that it had only been
defended by 100 Bore riflemen not
one of which was to be found, and
no sooner had he established him-
self there than batteries 3 miles
to the Northwest and Northeast opened
on him a tremendous shell fire which
no human power could stand as the
Boers had previously got the exact
range. The British tried to sent up[
artilery {artillery??} but the Boers changed the
range so as to rake the south solope,
and it was impossible to get the
guns up the hill, at night General
Warren retired leaving the hill covered
with dead and wounded.

1\28\1900 Sunday
Mr. Agustus Mashier died last
night at 11:30 of Brights disease.
We attended the Chapel this after-
noon Rev. Dr. John G. Davenport preached
there was a good attendence {attendance??} although
the weather was threatening at the
time meeting opened, and it began
snowing before meeting was out.
Wrote a letter to Fred who is in Detroit
this evening.

1\29\1900 Monday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Band met and practiced.

1\30\{1900} Tuesday
Worked in the factory to day.
Mr. Agustus Mashier was buried
to day with Masonic honors in
the Pine Grove Cemetery {Cemetary??}. He was
never a church-man since I knew
him, they had used the Episcopal
service and Dr. Rooland{??} officiated.
He was 89{??} years old.
Elton Edwards told Mary as she
was going to the funeral that
Harice{??} Tucker and him had been
into the old tannery building
and broke out several of the
windows.

1\31\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day as usual.
The ladies union held a supper and
entertainment at the Chapel this
evening, there was not a large attendence {attendance??}
present, the night was very cold,
but the entertainment was good it
consisted of recitations and music
by Mr. Bacon and the Misses Barkers
of Waterville, playing on the piano by
Ray Worden etc.

2\01\1900 Thursday
Worked in the factory to day as
usual. This has been the coldest morn-
ing thus far this winter. The ther-
mometer stood at 5 about zero.
This evening Mary went to the
Grange, but I stayed home and
worked whitewashing the cellear {cellar??}
till 9:30 when I went to bed, the
weather is very cold.

2\02\{1900} Friday
Worked as usual in the factory.
The weather has been very cold.

2\03\1900 Saturday
Worked as usual to day, this morn-
ing was very cold the thermometer
standing at 4 degrees below zero.

2\04\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon
the Rev. Mr. Parry preached.
After Chapel Mr. Beckley who was
killed at the Waterbury Manufacturing
Co. last Friday was buried in the
Pine Grove Cemetery {Cemetary??}. Many of the
people stayed to the funeral, we saw
the procession coming in the distance.
First about 50 Free Masons marching
with their white aprons on, next came
the minister in a carriage, then a bus
filled with "Red Men" of the Indipendent {Independant??}
Order, the{then??} the hears{hearse??} containing the
corps {corpse??}, then hacks and carriages.
The services at the grave were conducted
by the Masons first, who used their
usual form and droped {dropped??} into the grave
a sprig of Green. The{then??} the "Red Men"
who went through their ceremony
which included the letting go of
a white dove, which seemed at first
bewildered but flew and alighted on
the ridge of the Chapel where it remained
till after we had departed. Around the
Masons who droped {dropped??} a sprig of green into
the grove was Mr. Gaylord Alcott who
is sexton of the Pine Grove Cemetery {Cemetary??} and
is the oldest Mason in Waterbury having
joined the Order 52 years ago.

2\05\1900 Monday
Worked as usual in the factory.
It rained very hard all night
and this morning, the Mad river
was higher than I have seen it
in a long time.

2\06\{1900} Tuesday
Worked as usual to day.
Mrs. Able and Mary went this
afternoon soliciting for the
Chapel Fair which is to be given
next week, they went up the
Doolittle and Woodtick roads
also in the Meriden road from
Mrs. Anna Halls.
This evening Mr. Worden and I
went to the Parish house of St.
John's Church where the "Boy Choir"
was rehearsing and say Mr. Minor
the leader about getting them to
go the {to??} the Chapel and sing at the
Fair, they are to let us know
next Friday evening.

2\07\1900 Wednesday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
Received my pay for last weeks work
$13.50. This evening Mary and I went
up to Thoedore{??} Manson's and with others
made up crash{??} enough to cover the
Chapel floor, and also the dining
room, we brought home the dining
room crash{??} and Mary and I stitched
it up on our sewing machine, and
got through at eleven o'clock.
After which I copied about 20 verses
of Olliver Wendel Holmes' poem
"Grandmothers Story" which took\
till half past one o'clock.

2\08\1900 Thursday
Worked as usual to day.
It has rained nearly all the time
to day. This evening Mary and I
went to the Grange. I staid {stayed??} til nine
o'clock and walked home, the roads were
so muddy that my rubbers kept pulling
off. Mary staid {stayed??} and is going to ride
home with her brother Wilson L.
Pierpont.

2\09\{1900} Friday
Worked to day as usual.
Nelson Ovaitt [Oviatt] of Portland, Oregon
called at the shop to day and I had
a long talk with him, was glad he
called.
This evening Mr. Worden called and
he and I went to the Parish house
and saw Mr. Minor the Leader of the
Boy Choir and he told us that he
and 14 of the boys would come out to
the Chapel and sing at the first
night of the Fair, we then went to P.B.
Norton's stable and enganged{engaged??} a bus to run
use for 1.00 per night, we then stoped {stopped??} at Mr.
Duzenbury's market and he told us that
the Y.M.C.A. Orchestra would be at
their building ready to come out at
7:30 o'clock Thursday evening.

2\10\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day as usual. To night
after work Irving and I worked white-
washing in the cellar.

2\11\1900 Sunday
Got up at 7:30 and had breakfast
of stewed oysters, stayed about home
and read till noon when I got ready
and went with Robert Worden to
the trolley cars at Silver street
top meet Dr. Rooland{??} who preached
at the Chapel.
Nelson Ovaitt [Oviatt] of Portland
Oregon, who is here on a visit was
at the Chapel, he expects to leave
for the West tomorrow. This evening
I went to St. John's Church to see Mr.
Minor the leader of the Boy Choir about
singing at the Chapel Wednesday night,
as I was watching at one door to see him
when he came out, he passed out an other
and ran and jumped on a trolley car
and started for Naugatuck where he
lives. I went to Smith's Livery
stable and got my horse and wrode {rode??}
him home, stopping at Father's on
the way.

2\12\1900 Monday
Worked as usual in the factory
to day, it has rained more or
less all day and travelling is very
muddy.
This noon I went to the American
office and had an advertisement
put in the paper advertising the
Chapel Fair for which I paid $2.00
for an inch of column space three
days.
This evening Mary and I went
to the Chapel and with Hiram
Able and Morris Alcott put the crash{??}
on the floor and got the chairs put
away and one booth erected.

2\13\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day as usual. Went to the
Chapel this evening and helped get it
ready for the Fair.
Has rained very hard all day and the
water in the river is higher than it
has been before in years, and the shop
had to shut down at half past two o'clock.

2\14\1900 Wednesday
Worked to day as usual.
It has cleared up and the weather is
good. Went to the Chapel Fair this
evening, there was a large crowd
there.

2\15\{1900} Thursday
Worked to day in the shop.
Mr. Henry Carter of Wolcott died
to day in the livery stable of
Philo B. Norton on Phoenix Alley.
He was sitting in a chair when he ex-
claimed to Lyman Norton Lyme "I'm
sick" and then fell over dead, he is
aged 61 years.
I have known him ever since I was
a small boy, he was a good man, a leader
in all Church matters, and a deacon.
Has represented the town in the Legislator {Legislature??}
several times, been Selectman many
years was on the town school board, President
of the Wolcott Agricultural Society.
Master of Mad River Grange, and was
chosen juror for many years in suc-
cession, and was respected by all men.
This evening all of my family except
Margaret and Pierpont went to the
Fair at Mill Plain Chapel, there was
a large attendence {attendance??}. The Young Men's
Christian Association's Orchestra
furnished entertainment, and was fine.
Uncle A.W. Goldsmith came out to the
Chapel to see about repairing the brick
work around the furnace in the cellar
so as to keep the water out, he thought
it would cost from 10 to 20 dollars.

2\16\1900 Friday
Worked in the factory to day as
usual. The weather to day has been
clear and cool.
the ladies of the neighborhood who are
interested in Chapel work went to
the Chapel to day and took down
the trimmings and cleaned it out
so that the men can go tonight
and take the booths down.
Mr. and Mrs. Thoedore {Theodore??} Munson
had a new son born to them at
noon to day.
Mrs. McCouley who lives in
a house that stands midway between
the Wolcott and Woodtick roads
and South of the Stilson road died
last Munday {Monday??}, she was an old lady.

2\17\{1900} Saturday
Worked in the factory, got through
at 4:30 as usual saturday {Saturday??}.
It has snowed hard since 9 o'clock
this morning and there is about
8 inches of snow on the ground to-
night. This evening Clyde, Irving
and myself went to the Chapel and
built a fire in the furnace in the
cellar, the pit of which was nearly full
of water and we had to bail it out
before we could make the fire burn.
Soon Hiram Able and Warren Hitch-
cock came and we took down the booths
and tables used at the fair, and took
up the crash {??} that covered the carpet,
also we swept it out and put things
in order for the meeting tomorrow,
we got through at nine o'clock and
came home in the big farm wagon
the weather was very stormy and
the wind blew the snow with such
force that it was hard to breath {breathe??}.

2\18\1900 Sunday
To day the snow lies piled in drifts
and the wind has blown hard all
the time.
Irving and I started at eleven for
Woolcott to attend the funeral of
Mr. Henry B. Carter we went by
way of Mill Plain and the West Wolcott
road as that way we caught less wind.
The road for the most part was covered
with snow but in places was bare
and nearly all of the way the sleigh cut
through to the ground.
We reached the Church a little before
one o'clock and after hitching the horse
under the sheds and covering him well
with blankets, went inside to get out
of the wind and cold, soon the pro-
cession arrived and the corps {corpse??} was
borne into the Church and placed
before the alter {altar??} by Mr. Austin B.
Pierpont, Mr. William Fabor, Mr. Evelin
Upson and Mr. Frederick Higgins
who acted as pall carriers. The
funereal discours {discourse??} was preached by
the Rev. Mr. Waters. The Church
was well filled, which was remarkable
as the snow and wind togather {together??}
with the cold was almost unbearable.
After the sermon the Grange com-
mitment service was used in
the Church as the weather was
so severe that it could not be used
at the grave, after which the remains
were placed in the ambulance which
was used as a hearse and borne to the
grave yard a {at??} the foot of the hill, the
men only going to the grave, except
the hack which contained the near
relatives of the deceased, i.e. Mr. Carter
wife Frederick Carter, brother Mable,
adopted daughter and her husband.
After the funeral we started home
and in coming down the steep hill\
near the Nenry Carter place broke
one of the shafts of the sleigh. I tied
it up however and came along
and we encountered big drifts
of snow this side of Woodtick
but managed to get along till we
got this wside of Lilley Brook when
we got into one so deep that the
snow was coming over the dash board
and the trace broke, I had a cold time
fixing it and with a shovel which
I carried dug a way through the
rest of the way, only to find an-
other drift farther on blocking the
road up entirely fully six feet deep and
five rods long this I dug through
and found the rest of the way fairly
easy.

2\19\{1900} Monday
Worked as usual to day. This has
been a very disagreeable day as the
wind and snow blew hard and it
has been very cold.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met
for practice this evening.

2\20\1900 Tuesday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to
Mrs. Able to see about arranging
for the next supper at the Chapel
which takes place one week from
tomorrow night.
Mrs. Able seemed rather stubborn
and cared not wheather {whether??} the
Chapel went ahead or not, she
seemed rather tired.

2\21\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day in the factory.
Last evening Murry Beebe family
of Vermont and Miss Bessid Miles
and a Mr. Pulver and Miss Cheffield
were married at the house of Mr.
David Shannon near the Grange
hall. Murry is about 22 years of
age and Bessie 19.
The insurance on my shop
of $1000.00 came due to day, on
which there is a premium
of 27.50, this evening I sent
Clyde and Irving to Mr. John
G. Jones with 20.00 and will
pay the balance next week.
This evening Bertha and Clara
French and Olive Able came to
our house to make arrangements
for the married men's supper at
the Chapel, also to talk over the
young ladies' and single men's
supper.

2\22\1900 Thursday
This is Washington's Birth-day
and the Factories are generally
shut down as it is a legal holoday {holiday??}.
I stay home and white washed the
inside of the hen-coop this fore
noon, as it was very stormy
it having rained hard all night
and today the mad River was
highter than it has been before
this year.
This evening I went horse-back
out to harry Laughton's just
over the Cheshire line to get the
money for Chapel fair tickets
he had sold also stopped at Mr.
Worden's, then came home ate
supper and went to the Grange.

2\23\{1900} Friday
Worked to day in the factory.
The weather has been warm and damp.

2\24\1900 Saturday
Worked to day as usual.
Henry and Harry Buckingham
came this evening and we practiced
drumming and fifing sacred music,
untill {until??} about 10 o'clock.
Wrote a letter to Ridaback{??} & Co. of 141
Grand Street N.Y. about Military
goods.

2\25\{1900} Sunday
The weather to day has been cold
and windy, a little snow fell this
morning.
Mr. Able called and told us that
there would be no service in the
Chapel on account of the cellar being
flooded. I immediately went and
saw James Porter about the drain
as I never knew just how it was
laid. I then went to East Farms
and saw Mr. Worden and we went
to the Chapel taking a lot of tools
and Clyde, Irving and Pierpont.
We found about a foot of water in
the cellar. I found a bank of dirt
in front of the drain pipe which I dug
away. I then ran in a 16 ft. stick and by
nailing on continuous poles punched
a way clear through the pipe, which was
about 50 ft. long, the water then ran out
in about 1/2 hour, we then came home
it being very cold.
This evening we Mary and I went to
Hiram Able's and paid to Mrs. Able
$22.55 which I had got from the sale
of tickets for the Chapel fair.
Charles Cass and wife had a
10 pound baby girl bourn {born??} to them
yesterday.

2\26\1900 Monday
The weather to day has been very
cold, to night the thermometer
stood 4 above zero at 10 o'clock.
The Mattatuck Drum Band
met for practice in my house
to night as it was to {too??} cold for
them to meet in the new build-
ing and also Clyde painted the
stovepipe and stove with black
japan last Saturday which made
such a smell that one could not stay
in the building.

2\27\{1900} Tuesday
To day has been very cold 2 below
zero this morning.
News has come to day that Gen.
Cronje of the Bore {??} army in South
Africa has surrendered with 4,000
men yesterday morning to Lord
Roberts who had him encompassed
with an army of 50,000 English
who have been bombarding him
since a week ago Sunday morning.
After work, i went out to Mr.
Robert D. Barrett's with Mr. Byers
who wished to see Mr. Barrett in
the interests of the Royal {Cleanrun??}
lodge of which Mr. Barrett is a
member. Mr. Barrett is very sick.

2\28\1900 Wednesday
The weather to day is not so cold.
Worked in the factory as usual.
This evening all of my family
went to the Chapel to the supper and
entertainment. The supper was a very
good one and the entertainment
interesting. It was furnished by the
teachers of the school, Miss May
Tatem and Miss Height, they had
the children sing, recite, and march
which was very interesting.
The water in the Chapel cellar is
making lots of trouble, the furnace
which heats the building was put
in new last summer and in order
to have it heat proper the {they??} dug a
pit two feet deep and bricked up
the sides and placed the furnace
in it, not the water comes in and
fills it up so the fire will not
burn, the Chapel committee had
uncle Goldsmith lay the brickwork
over again but still the water
comes in, and he says that he
cannot fix it till dry weather.
I told them that I thought that I
could fix it, and they told me to
do so if I can.

3\01\1900 Thursday
Worked as usual in the factory.
This morning when I got up it was
raining and so icy that I could
not drive the horse to the shop so
I had to walk. The rain kept coming
harder and faster till night when
the river was a foot higher than
I have seen it for several years.
The shop had to stop work at four
o'clock because the water set back
through the raice {race??} way into the
wheel pit of the big engine.

3\02\{1900} Friday
Worked to day as usual in the
factory. The weather has been quite
cold to day and a little snow fell.
This evening Clyde, Irving, Hiram
Able and myself went to the
Chapel and partly made a
wooden pump to pump out the
furnace pit, came home at nine
o'clock and went to bed.

3\03\1900 Saturday
Worked in the shop as usual
except that tonight we had to draw
the water out of the ditch and get
into the water wheel and get out a
stick that had cloged {clogged??} the gate.
The weather is quite cold.

3\04\{1900} Sunday
The weather has been very nice
and warm to day. This morning
Irving, Clyde and myself went to the
Mill Plain Chapel and put in a copper
dam pump to pump the water out
of the pit that the furnace is in, it
worked good.
In the afternoon we attended worship,
the Rev. Mr. Parry of the Grand Street
Baptice {Baptist??} church preached.

3\05\1900 Monday
Worked in the factory to day as usual.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met for
practice this evening, we took a short
march up to Mainson's corner.
The French girls (Bertha and Clara)
had a kitchen dance at thir {their??} house this
evening.

3\06\{1900} Tuesday
Worked in the factory. Mr. James
Tobin the superintendent has been
home sick yesterday and to day.
This evening Irving and I went
to the Chapel and worked repairing
the furnace pit in the cellar.
The young people of the neighbor-
hood met in the Chapel to practice
a drill that they expect to give some
time in the future.

3\07\{1900} Wednesday
Worked in the factory 9 hours this
noon I went up on east mountain
to see Miles Payne and was gone
one hour, this evening Irving
and I went to the Chapel and
I worked on the furnace pit in
the cellar. About 8 o'clock the young
people came and the rehursed {rehearsed??} a
fancy drill that is to be given in
the Chapel two weeks from next
Thursday evening. Morris Alcott
also came and helped me on the
furnace pit till 10 o'clock.
To day Mary, Mrs. Able and my
Mother went to the Chapel and
worked quilting a bed quilt.
When Pierpont was carrying Mother
home in the team they met Clyde
with Father's horse and buggy who
waid that Sister Cara had been
taken sick with a fit.

3\08\1900 Thursday
Worked to day in the factory.
This evening Irving and I went
to the Chapel and worked on the
furnace pit till 10:30 o'clock.
Mary went to the grange.

3\09\1900 Friday
Worked to day as usual in the fac-
tory. Last night Michael Dunn
died very sudden of heart disease
he worked yesterday as usual in
the shop and we were talking as
we did almost every day he was
45 years old and had worked at
Rogers and Brother's factory many
years.
The Connecticut Light and Power
Company have today put up sever-
al new electric arc lights one
on the South side of East Main
Street west of my shop, one near
the Mattatuck factory, one on
the Meriden road North of
Carrington's brook and one at
the fork of the Woodtick and
Meriden roads, near the Mill
Plain Chapel.
The Mill Plain School closed to
day for two weeks on account of
many of the pupels {pupils??} being home
sick with the measels {measles??}.
This evening Irving and I went to
the Chapel and worked a little while.

3\10\1900 Saturday
Worked to day as usual in the shop.
This evening after work I went horse
back out on Southington mountain
to see Sam Samuelson about mixing
Carlsen's Portland cement.
A family has moved to day into
the Thomas Melbourne place, which
is now owned by A.B. Pierpont.
A Mr. Brewey of Watervill {??} has
rented the Byam farm.

3\11\1900 Sunday
The weather to day is rather cool.
This morning I saddled the horse
and went over to George Casses and
then he and Charlie Hotchkiss and
myself went horseback over to George
Hines and he saddled his horse
and we then rode to my house
where we watered the horses and
then went to Mr. Robert Hotchkiss
then up to Mr. Thomas Fairclough's
house in Wolcott where we got warm
and he gave us plenty of apples to eat
and cider to drink after which we
went to Mr. William Prichard's and
he gave me {the??} address of Earnest Nichols
No. 78 Maple Street Bristol Conn. which
I wanted.
We then came home stopping on the
way at Adelbert Norton's.
This afternoon I went to the Chapel
the Rev. Mr. Brickley of Trinity church
preached.

3\12\{1900} Monday
Worked to day in the factory.
The weather has been very cold and
windy. Mr. Michael Dunn who died
Thursday night of a paraletic stroke
had a very large funeral yesterday.
It was from the Church of the Sacred
heart (Roman Catholic) and was atten-
ded by many carriages and over
200 people on foot, he was buried in
the new Saint Joseph cemetery.
The Mattatuck Drum Band had
a meeting to night, the minutes of
several meetings past were read
by the Secretary as was the Consti-
tution and By Laws.

3\13\1900 Tuesday
Worked as usual to day.
The weather was very cold this morn-
ing but is warmer to night.
Irving and I went to the Chapel
this evening and repaired the
pump that pumps out the furnace
pit.

3\14\{1900} Wednesday
Worked in the factory to day.
The weather has been very nice and
clear.
This evening, the married men
furnished the supper at the
Chapel, they cleared 19.00.

3\15\1900 Thursday
Worked 10 hours to day as usual.
It began snowing this morning at
nine o'clock and has snowed all day
at night it is about 4 inches deep
and still snowing.
Am going to bed at 9:30 as I am tired
and lame.

3\16\{1900} Friday
Worked to day as usual.
This morning the ground was cov-
ered in many places with slush knee
deep and it was hard traveling {travelling??}
especially for the girls that worked
in the factory.
Clara French began working in
the machine burnishing room at
Rogers & Brothers factory, she left
her home in time but before she
reached the shop she was wet through
and late so she turned back and
went home.
This evening the young folks and
myself went to the Chapel, I tried
a new barrell {barrel??} of Royal Crass{??} cement
on the furnace pit, and found
that it worked much better than
the Alson's which we have had.
There has been a great ice storm
to day and the trees and building
are covered with ice.

3\17\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day as usual in the factory.
This is Saint Patrick's day and is
observed by the Irish by wearing
green ribbons and other emblems.
This day is remarkable from the
fact that the British Government
have given her Irish soldiers liberty
to wear their national plant the
Shamrock and the green and all
of the high government officers are
wearing, in years past it has been
scrictly {strictly??} forbidden.
Clyde and Bertha French went with
my team to day canvassing for
the Young Ladies supper for the
Chapel which is to be given one
week from next Wednesday evening.
Clyde, Irving and myself went to
the Chapel and worked on the furnace
pit a while this evening.
It has been very cold all day and
the boys have had great sport skating
on the frozen snow in the lots.

3\1\1900 Sunday
Stayed about home all day except
that I went to the service at the Chapel.
The Rev. Mr. Trinkans of Waterville
preached.

3\19\1800 {1900??} Monday
Worked as usual.
It has rained all day and much
of the snow has disapeared {disappeared??}|.
Stoped {stopped??} at my shop and looked at
platform which needs repairing.
Told Peter that I would see about Mr.
Clark's wagon which he had run out.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met for
practice to night.

3\20\{1900} Tuesday
Worked as usual. This is the first
day of spring, and is warm and
spring like.
This evening I went and saw Sam
Squires and George Cass and Chas
Hotchkiss to see if they will come
and practice at my house tomorrow
night.
The man who has moved into the
Thomas Melbourn place is Mr.
Smithfield and he works at the
clock shop gets 2.75 per day.

3\21\1900 Wednesday
Worked in the factory to day as
usual.
This evening Charles Hotchkiss, George
Case, Clyde, Irving, Henry Bucking-
ham, Harry Buckingham, Sam
Squares and myself practiced
drumming and fifing by the
new method at my house.

3\22\{1900} Thursday
Worked to day as usual.
Henry Buckingham got through
working at Rogers & Brothers this
morning after working there 17 years.

3\23\1900 Friday
Worked to day as usual in the
factory. This evening the boys
met for practice at my house.

3\24\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day in the factory .
This evening Clyde, Irving and
I went to the Chapel and worked
on the furnace pit.

3\25\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this after-
noon, Rev. Dr. Davenport preached.

3\26\{1900} Monday
Worked in the factory to day
as usual.
This evening the Mattatuck
Drum Band held a meeting
to practice. We also went up to
Charlie Casse's where we bid him
good bye as he is about to move
away to Southington.
Every member of the Band was
present.

3\27\1900 Tuesday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening the young people
went to the Chapel to rehearse {reherse??} for
the entertainment to be given
at the Chapel tomorrow evening.
Irving has been home from school
sick. Henry Buckingham went to
work at Seaville Mfg. Co's to day.

3\28\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day as usual.
To day in the factory the boys
that work in the making room
struck for more pay.
To day was pay day and this
afternoon after they had received
their pay they marched in
a line about twelve in number
to Mr. Tobin's office and asked for
more pay. He told them to go back
to work but they took their coats
and went home.
This evening the Ladies Union had
a supper and entertainment at
the Chapel. The young ladies furnish-
ed the supper was fine and the
entertainment was excellent.

3\29\1900 Thursday
Worked as usual in the
factory. This evening Charles
Cass, Henry and Harry Buck-
ingham, George Cass, Charles
Hotchkiss and Irving and I
met and practiced playing
sacred music.
General Hubert who was Commander-in-Chief
of the Boer forces in South Africa was buried
to day.

3\30\{1900} Friday
Worked as usual in the factory
to day.
Mr. Byers who is a foreman
of the Machine Burnishing room
of Rogers & Brothers moved to day
into Mr. Carlson's house on the
Southnayd road.

3\31\1900 Saturday
Worked this day as usual,
although the factory did not run
for want of work (or orders).
Received {recived??} a letter from Mrs. John
J. Able No. 1604 Bolton Street Baltimore
Md., enclosing two letters which
Mr. James M. Somers of 158 Park
St. Bridgeport sent her, giving
much information regarding the
Geneology of the Somer's family.

4\01\{1900} Sunday
The weather to day has been clear
and cool, there has been many forest
fires.
This forenoon Charlie Cass, Charlie
Hotchkiss, Henry and Harry
Buckingham, George Cass,
Sam Squares, Clyde, Irving and
myself met and rehearsed fifing and
drumming sacred music, we got through
at about 11:30 o'clock.
This afternoon Mary and I went to
Motehr Pierpont's at East Farms and
there met Wilson and Charlie Pierpont
and we went to the South Woods
and found that Sidney Bronson
had chopped over a piece of land
that belonged to Mother Pierpont
the bounds of which are not to be
found. They agreed that I should
trace the records and find the bounds
if possible and then have Sid pay
the price that the wood was worth
standing.
The Children went to the Mill
Plain Chapel, the Rev. Dr. Parry
preached.
The Rev. Dr. Rooland of St. John's
Church, handed in his resignation
to take effect July 1st he has preached
there 16 years.

4\02\1900 {Monday}
Worked to day as usual in the
factory.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met
for practice at eight o'clock this
evening after practicing a while
we went up to John French's and
drummed in the house to drive
the rats away, after playing
several tunes, the girls brought
out cakes, fruit, coffeee etc. all
of which was very good, at ten
o'clock we came home, and I
went to bed at 10:30.
Charlie Cass moved to day
from the Doolittle place to the
Dick Frisbie place in Marion.

4\03\{1900} Tuesday
Worked in the factory,
the Connecticut Light and
Power Company are surveying
for a trolley line to connect
the Waterbury line at Silver
Street with the Bristol line
at Compound Pond. They have
surveyed up East Main Street to
the Meriden Road and out the Mer-
iden Road to Frank Lockhart's
where they leave the road and
run NorthWest back of Lock-
hart's house and on up the run
to Kilbourn's swamp and across
the West Wolcott Road south of
George Prichard's house and
then North across Long HIll
Road then East crossing the
Wolcott Road again and then
to the vicinity {vacinity??} of the Mad
River which they follow to
Woodtick.

4\04\1900 Wednesday
Worked as usual in the factory.
This evening I worked repairing my
harness.

4\05\1900 Thursday
Worked in the factory.
This evening George Cass, Charlie
Hotchkiss, Charlie Cass, Harry
Buckingham, Clyde, Irving, and
myself practiced drumming and
fifing the following tunes which
we intend to play at the Chapel
next Wednesday. Coronation,
Portuguese Humn, Onward
Christian Soldiers, and Auld Lansyne.
Mary went to the Grange,
I went to Mr. Carlson's and measured
the distance from the house to
the well for a pipe to connect
the tank in house with the
pump.

4\06\{1900} Friday
This morning I wrote a letter
to Montgomery Ward & Co. of Chicago
about boot tops, also a letter to the
M. Richardson Co. of New York, in
which I sent 1.00 to pay last year's
subscription of the "Blacksmith
and Wheelwright" and a letter
to Mr. Buell of Moodres{??} Conn.
Worked in the factory ten hours.
This evening I repaired the horse
saddle, and then practiced drum-
ming with Irving while Clyde
played the fife.

4\07\1900 Saturday
Worked in the factory nine hours
although they pay for ten hours
work Saturdays. The shop was shut
down to day, but the machinists and
several others worked. I worked rep-
airing the main shaft where one of
the pillow blacks had been burned
out and was loose.
The Waterbury Republican Publish-
ing Co. offered to pay the expenses
of ten School teachers of the town
and city who obtained the largest
number of votes of the people who
buy the Republican News paper.
Each paper entitled the purchaser
to 5 votes. Yesterday evening the
voting ended, and announced {??} the
ten who are going is Cousin
Jennie Phillips, she received
about 70,000 votes.
This evening Sam Squares,
George Cass, Harry and Henry
Buckingham, Clyde, Irving,
and myself met and rehearsed
drumming and fifing. We prac-
tised till 10 o'clock.
I sold to Miles Payne one planing {plaining??}
machine for planing {plaining??} wood for
which he paid me $10.00 he also paid
me 1.00 for a saw arbour. He bought
too a length of shaft two hangers
and three belt pulleys, weight 300 lbs
for which he is to pay $9.00.

4\08\1900 Sunday
Got up at six this morning and
white washed my little-room,
after which I did the barn chores,
then Pierpont and Raymond who
were up called the boys and
girls, and we had breakfast
after which, Harry and Henry
Buckingham, George Cass, Charlie
Hotchkiss came and we practiced
drumming and fifing sacred music
till near noon after which George Cass
and Henry Buckingham went to
Marion to see Charlie Cass, and
Harry Buckingham stayed and
copied {copyed??} music.
I got washed and saddled the horse
and went to Dan Square's to see
if Sam would get Sidney Risland's
drum tomorrow. I then came home
and got ready for the Chapel service
which I attended. The Rev. Mr. Rafter of
Waterville preached, the service was
fairly well attended, Mary and I
came home together {togather??} crossing the
lots, as we came home we saw away
to the South, east and west
great forest fires burning.
After we had ate supper of baked
potatoes, baked beef, escollaped oysters,
pudding, etc., I went out to see
Mr. Harry Garrigus about doing
some joiner work at my shop,
came home at eight o'clock.
While I was there Henry Cass came to
see Bessie.
While we were eating supper George
Cass and Charlie Hotchkiss came to
see Clyde about making arrangements
for the poverty supper to be given
at the Chapel next Wednesday evening.

4\09\1900 Monday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Band met for practice, it was voted
to go to Marion and drum three
weeks from to night.
At 4 o'clock I left the shop and Clyde
and I went to Mr. Carlson's and
laid a water-pipe from the pump
to the house, the well is a drilled well
6 in. in diameter and 66 ft. deep, the
first 30 ft. is through earth and the
remainder rock, they drilled 62 ft.
before striking water and then it
filled up to within 15 ft. of the
top, I did not have pipe enough
into six inches so I could not
finish the job.

4\10\1900 Tuesday
Worked as usual in the factory.
Went to night after work to Mr.
Carlson's and put in the re-
mainder of the pipe, then came
home had supper of roast beef
of which I am fond, then went
to the Chapel and rehearsed
martial music for the enter-
tainment next Wednesday
evening, it was cold when we
came home.

4\11\{1900} Wednesday
Worked as usual in the factory.
This evening, the young met of
the neighborhood gave a poverty
supper at the Chapel.
The supper was the same as usual
but they fined everybody a small
fee that wore any jewelry {juelery??} white
collars, cuffs, shirts, or ribbons {ribbens??},
neckties, etc. etc.
For entertainment a few of the
members of the Mattatuck Drum
Corps played sacred music, it
did not seem to take very well.
Then we played the Russian march
to the old style and time and that
brought great applause.
They took in 14.22.

4\12\1900 Thursday
Worked in the factory to day as
usual.
To day is my Father's birthday and
he is 70 years old, this evening all
of the children and their wives {wives??} and all
the grandchildren had supper at Father's
in honor of the event, there were 21
present including Mr. William Gillette
and Hattie Burgher of Prospect,
Frank, who is a rooler{??} at Benedict &
Burnham's had to work till 10 o'clock
and could not be there and Fred
and his wife who live in Detroit
were absent.

4\13\1900 Friday
This is Fast day and the factory
is closed.
This morning Clyde mounted on
Father's horse and I and old Jack started
for Woodbury. Went in East Main
Street to Silver, then over new Washing-
ton Street to the old Lawn Plot Road
on Highland Avenue as it is now
called then across Tamrack Swamp
to the Middlebury Road which we
follwoed to Middlebury then on
past the lower end of Luassapough{??}
Pond and over the hills to Wood-
bury which we reached at noon.
We went to Mr. Shelley's blacksmith
shop and saw him, and told him that we were looking for some grand army
men who knew about the exercises
that were to be held on Decoration
Day, he referred me to a Mr. Strong,
and Mr. David L. Somers, who
were members of the "Order of American
Mechanics," who have charge of the
exercises, we then went and had
our horses put out at the Central
Hotel and had dinner our selves
for which we paid .50 cts. each for
the dinner and .25 cts. each for the
horses' feed.
We then called on Mr. Strong at
his Drug Store and gave him our
terms which were $12.00 and expenses.
He seemed pleased, and will let us
know next week whether they will
need us or not.
We then went to the house of
David L. Somers, which was situated
off the road from Woodbury to
Watertown. He too seemed pleased
as it relieved him of a load, he had
to look up a Drum Corps.
We then came home via the
Watertown and Bunker Hill roads where
we turned South and came out
onto the Middlebury road at
Tamrack Swamp.
We then stopped at Mr. George Connor's
for a few minutes and then came
home which we reached at about 6:30
o'clock.

4\1\1900 Saturday
No work in the factory to day.
Did not get up till 6:30 o'clock,
had breakfast late and went to
my shop with Clyde and loaded
a lot of plant on the wagon for
him to take to the shop of
C.E. Smith on Benedict Street
to have edged up, went with
him the first load and he kept
on drawing all day, I went to
a barber's shop and had my
hair cut and also got shaved, for
which I paid 35 cts. I then went to
the town clerk's office and looked
over the land records to find
out about the property of Austin
Pierpont 1850, stayed there till noon,
came home, got dinner, and went
back again taking Irving with
me, worked copying till 5 o'clock
when we came home.

4\15\1900 Sunday
Stayed about home till Chapel time
when I went to the Service. This is Easter
Sunday and the Chapel was filled
nearly every seat being taken.
Rev. Dr. Davenport preached.
After service we came home, and I
ground up some horse radish after
which we ate supper of roast beef, after
supper I jumped on the horse's back
and went to Adelbert Norton's in
Wolcott and got a uniform that he
had that belonged to the Mattatuck
Drum Corps.
Ted Hine got shot in the leg last
Friday by an Italian who was try-
ing to sell him a revolver, and not
knowing that it was loaded, it
went off while he was showing
him how it worked.

4\16\1900 Monday
Worked in the shop to day as
usual.
Clyde worked drawing plank
from my shop to Mr. Smith's
mill and had them edged up and
then drew them back again.
The Mattatuck Drum Band
had a meeting this evening
and they voted to appoint
Howard Neal, Herman Gessert
and George Somers a committee
to act with the Leader to see
about repairing the uniforms,
also voted to have each member
buy a pair of indigo blue pants
to use with uniforms.

4\17\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at Rogers & Brothers'
factory.
Charlie Trepanier commenced
working at my shop putting down
a new floor and the west staging.

4\18\{1900} Wednesday
Worked in the factory as usual.
Received my pay at the shop
which amounted to 9.00.
Wrote three postal cards to Concrete
side-walk contractors this morning
for Morris Alcott.
Charlie Trepanier worked for me a spell to
day.

4\19\1900 Thursday
Worked to day as usual for Rogers
& Brothers.
This evening I went to the Grange
and heard Dr. Munn lecture on
the Mound builders of North
America.

4\20\{1900} Friday
Worked as usual to day.
The weather has been wet and warm.
We ploughed the garden this evening.

4\21\{1900} Saturday
The factory shut down to day, but
I had work. This evening I worked
papering my room.

4\22\1900 Sunday
Went to the Chapel to day, the Rev.
Dr. Harman preached the attendance
was not as large as it is sometimes.
This evening I went out and saw
Nelson Todd about land bounds.

4\23\1900 Monday
Worked as usual to day. The weather
has been fine.
A family of Italians (I think) has
moved into the Doolittle place to
day. The Mattatuck Drum Band
met for practice this evening and
after transacting the usual business
we went out and marched down the
Cheshire Road, up the Southayd Road
to the Meriden Road out the Meriden
and down the Doolittle Road to
John French's where we stopped and
had a drink of water and after play-
ing several pieces, and getting Clara
and John who had gone to bed up
we marched home. This morning
Clyde, Irving and I got up at 3:30
this morning and went to the
Doolittle place and got a load of
hay.

4\24\1900 Tuesday
Worked as usual to day. This noon
as the children were eating dinner
Margaret had a sort of spasm,
and Mary sent for the doctor who
did notning for her and could not
account for it. This evening I went
to see Edwin Welton on Linden
Street but he was not at home.

4\25\[1900} Wednesday
Worked to day as usual at Rogers &
Brothers Factory.
This evening I went to the supper
and entertainment at Mill Plain
Chapel. This is the last regular
supper to be given this season.
The supper was a success about 10.00
was realized.
The entertainment consisted of
a selection on the piano, a
reading by Mrs. Eddy, recitation
by Lena Hurlburt, reading by
a watch-shop girl, flute solo by Rev.
Mr. Pinkus, bass solo by Mr. Buck
of Waterville, reading by Mr. Rafter
of Waterville etc.

4\26\{1900} Thursday
Worked in the factory to day.
The weather was very cold last
night.
This evening I received a uniform
coat from Major Charles B. Andrus
of the Putnam Phalanx of Hartford
and Irving and I went to town with
it and saw Mr. Gessert about having
our coats made over similar to
it.

4\27\{1900} Friday
Worked in the factory to day
as usual. The factory did not run
to day.

4\28\{1900} Saturday
Worked in the factory.
This evening Irving and I went
to town and saw Mr. Gessert and
he said that the uniforms for the
Mattatuck Drum Corps were not
worth making over.
We then went to Mr. Davenport's
and borrowed the history of Fairfield
County and also the history of Conn.
by Barber.
Irving then went to Mr. Gessert's tailor
shop and got the coat that belonged to
the Putnam Planx of Hartford
and then both of us went to Goldstine's
on South Main Street to see about having
boot-tops made for the drum corps.

4\29\1900 Sunday
This morning Irving, Pierpont
and myself, and Clyde on his
Bicycle went up to the North West
part of Wolcott and got a lot of trailing
arbutus.
John Cunningham of the 9th Regt.
United States Volunteers who died
while in service in the Phillipine Islands
last January was buried in Calvary
Cemetary this afternoon with military
honours, C.J.C.D.G.{??} attending in
a body, and fired three volleys over
the grave.
The Rev. Dr. Anderson preached at
the Chapel this afternoon.

4\30\1900 Monday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening it was very cloudy
and dark, we had a slight thunder
shower about six o'clock. About 7
Herman Gessert, George Somers,
Burt Haskins, and Howard Neal
came in a double team, and George
Cass and Harry Buckingham
were in George Cass' team, Fred
Somers and George Atkinson were
in George's team, Charlie Hotchkiss
and Sam Squires were in Charlie
Hotchkiss' team, and I had Clyde,
Irving, Henry Buckingham and
myself in my own team, and we
went to Marion where we drummed
from Mr. Neal's to Charlie Cass'
house where we had cake, lemonade,
cider etc. after which we marched to
Mrs. Neal's and had more refresh-
ments, and then came home where we
arrived at about 2 o'clock.
As we went through East Farms
the Southwoods were all on fire
and a great amount of wood that
was cut and piled ready for market
was burning in amount I should
judge about 200 cords, it belongs
to Sidney Bronson and Benedict
& Burnham.

5\01\{1900} Tuesday
Ringland Brothers' Circus is
in town to day and nearly all
of the factories are closed.
I worked planting in the garden
till 9 o'clock when I hitched up
and took the children down to
see the street parade, which was the
largest I ever saw. I stood near the
Soldier's monument and by the
clock in St. John's Church tower. It
was 1/2 hour in passing. There
were four bands of music, many
open cages containing Lions,
Hoppopotomas', Leopards, Tigers,
etc. etc., also about 10 Elephants, one
of which was drawing a heavy
cannon, and many horse back
riders etc., we came home after
the parade, and worked in the garden
till about 5 o'clock, when I rode to
David Frisbie's at Woodtick, came
home at dark, am not feeling well to
day as I caught a bad cold yesterday
and last night and have the grippe
or influenza, which almost everyone
is suffering with.

5\02\1900 Wednesday
Worked as usual in the factory to day.
Received my pay 13.50 for last week's
work.

5\03\1900 Thursday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
We had a thunder shower at six this
evening and it is still raining.

5\04\{1900} Friday
Worked in the factory today as usual.
The weather is very cold. Quite a little
snow fell this forenoon so the ground
was covered, but it soon melted.

5\05\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day. This evening Irving
and I went to town. It was so cold
that we wore our overcoats. We
went first to Jones and Margan's
Clothing Store where I bought a pair
of blue pants for $3.50, a hat for .98 and
they threw in a pair of webbing sus-
penders. We then went to P.J. Boylan's
hardware store and bought a lot of
seed and a belt punch for .50 cts.,
we then went to Hemingway's fish
market and bought 1/2 pk. of clams
for .30 cts. We then went to City
Corners to Brother Frank's and
he gave me a lot of garden seed. We
then came home which we reached
about 9 o'clock.

5\06\1900 Sunday
This morning Clyde took the horse and
buggy and with a party of young
folks went to Meriden Mountain. They
were to be back before Chapel time but
George Hine's horse had the colic and they
thought it would die, so they were late
about getting home.
This afternoon I attended meeting at the
Chapel, the Rev. Mr. Parry preached, the
Chapel was well filled.

5\07\{1900} Monday
Worked to day as usual.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met this
evening and elected officers as follows:
C.S. Miller Leader, Charles Cass Assistant
Leader, George Cass Secretary,
Charles Hotchkiss Treasurer, Howard
Neal Property Manager.

5\08\1900 Tuesday
Worked to day.
This evening I rode horse-back to
Cheshire center and saw Rev. Mr.
Nichols about turning out in
Cheshire Decoration Day. He thinks
that they will have no exercises there.

{5\9\1900} Wednesday
Worked as usual today.
The Ladies of Mill Plain gave
a stocking sociable this evening
in the Chapel, i.e. the ladies
sent out a large number of very
small stockings to the people, and
they brought them to the door and
each contained double the number
of cents that the size of the stocking
was that they wore. This was taken
from the stocking and the
stocking was returned, and they
received a check which entitled
each to ice cream and cake.
They took in $41.00.

5\10\1900 Thursday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.
I also went to Simonsville and saw
Brother Frank. He was to find out from
Jim Walker how the Second Reg't used
to whiten their cross belts, but Jim
had forgotton and Frank told me to
see Major Spenser.

5\11\{1900} Friday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening planted potatoes, and
worked about the garden. There was
a severe frost this morning as there
has been for several mornings.

{5\12\1900} Saturday
Worked as usual to day.
There was a frost this morning.
This evening I got through work at
4:30 o'clock came home in the
spindle buggy which Irving drove
down after me, had supper of
codfish and potatoes, after which I
and Clyde went to the Mill Plain
Chapel and helped Morris Alcott lift
up the platform so as to get the
crash from under it. I then went\
to see Mark Pond but he was not
home. We then drove to town, and
went and saw Mr. Minar about
making some boottops for the
Mattatuck Drum Band. I also
bought a pair of shoes for 2.50, we
then went to No. 61 Church Street
and saw Major Spenser about whiting
leather belts. He said use pulverized chalk,
gum arabic and glycerine. We then
went to the store of P.J. Baylor and
bought a hoe for which I paid 45 cts.
We then went to Hemingway's
fish market and bought 1/2 peck of
long clams for which I paid .30 cts.,
we then came home and then Clyde
and I finished a grape arbor which
we started this morning.

5\13\1900 Sunday
This morning I arose at about 6:30,
called Clyde and we ran the grape vines
upon the arbor, after which we ate break-
fast of boiled long clams. I then rode
over to George Cass' to see if he would
like to go to Cornwall Hollow Decoration
Day, provided the drum band did not
turn out, then came home and got
ready for the Chapel which I attended
at three o'clock. The Rev. Mr. hannon
preached. When we were coming home
Mrs. Cora Broadbent who has been
doing house-work for Major Tucker
told Mary that she is to get through
at Mr. Tucker's tomorrow or next day
as Mr. Charles Horn has rented Mr.
Tucker's house and is going to move
in Tuesday.
While I was waiting for supper,
Mary's brother Charlie Pierpont came
and wanted me to go out to the
South Woods and look at some land
bounds with him and John and
Elmer Pierpont. I ate a little supper
of pork and cowslips, and started
horseback and went out the plank
road and got there before they did,
found John Pierpont already there
and in a hurry to get away. John had
already been over the ground with Sid
Bronson yesterday and Uncle Joe Somers
this morning and found nearly all
of the bounds. They decided to have
Mr. Patten survey the land and make
a map of it. John borrowed some maps
from Jennie Bronson, and after we
had finished I carried them home
to her, I then went up and in the
Meriden Road home, and then listened
to Mary while she read to the children.
Robert D. Barrett who lives in the
old John Mix place, died at 11 o'clock last
night of a tumor inside of the lower
stomach.

5\14\{1900} Monday
Worked to day in the factory.
Mr. Charles Horne moved into
Mr. George W. Tucker's house to
day, the family consists of Mr.
and Mrs. Horne, Mrs. Horne's mother,
and a young man boarder.
Mr. Horne is a superintendant at
the Seaville Mfg. Co.

5\15\1900 Tuesday
Worked in the factory this forenoon.
This afternoon I went to Mr. Robert
Barrett's funeral, it was held in the
Mill Plain Chapel and the Rev. Mr.
Hanman of the First Methodist
Church officiated. He was buried
on the South slope of the hill in
the Mill Plain on Pine Grove Cemetary.
This afternoon I went after the funeral
to see Nelson Todd about the bounds
in the South woods of East Farms.

5\16\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day as usual. Received
my pay for last week's work.
After I got home Irving, Pierpont,
Raymond, Margaret, and Ruth
went out to the South Woods
at East Farms and gathered 1/2 bushel{??} of cowslips.

5\17\{1900} Thursday
Mary and
I went to the Grange this evening.
The factory did not run to day on
account of Forepough's Circus being
in town. I spent the greater part
of the day in working about home.
this afternoon Wilson Pierpont and
I went out to the South woods and
looked over the bounds of Mother
Pierpont's piece of woods that Sid
Bronson had cut off. We found
three of them, but the North West
bound we could not find.

5\18\1900 Friday
Worked as usual to day.

5\19\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day, but the shop did
not run.

5\20\1900 Sunday
The sun shone bright this morning. I got
up about seven o'clock, had breakfast
of codfish potatoes oatmeal etc. after reading
a spell in the History of Fairfield County,
Irving, Pierpont, and I went out to see
Nelson Todd and have him show us the
bounds in the South woods, but he
was not at home. We then went over
to the old William Munson place
and to an old Saw Mill site. This mill
was built by Warren Austin and Charles
Hall in company, when it was finished
they got mad at each other and neither
dared use the mill, so it ratted down
not a vestige of it remains except
some of the stone work on which it
stood.
This afternoon we went to the
Chapel. Rev. Mr. Hannon preached.
After Chapel Mary and I went to see
Mother who has been very sick.

5\21\1900 Monday
Worked to day in the factory.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps held its regular meeting for
practice.

5\22\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day for Rogers & Brother's
as usual. The factory ran 10 hours for
the first time since last December.

5\23\{1900} Wednesday
Worked as usual to day in the factory.
This evening Mary and I went to the
annual meeting of the Mill Plain
Chapel Society. The following
officers were elected:
Morris Alcott for the Episcopal Committee,
Charles Schiller " Congregational Committee,
Willie Garrigus " Methodist Committee,
Robert Worden " Baptist Committee,
Arthur J. Pierpont, Secretary,
H.J. Able, Treasurer,
Inez Beckwith, Organist,
Mr. Garrigus, Sunday School Superintendant,
Henry Cook, Asst. Superintendant.
The treasurer reported 47.04 in Chapel
treasury, and Mrs. Munson reported
199.44 in the treasury of the Ladies
Union. Mr. Garrigus reported 42.08
in the Sunday School treasury.
making a total of 288.56 in all.

5\24\1900 Thursday
Worked to day as usual.
The weather to day has been fine.
Mary and I went this evening to
the Grange.

5\25\{1900} Friday
Worked to day as usual.

5\26\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day moving the fence
on the North side of Rogers & Brothers
shop to the new line adjoining
the park.
This evening Irving, Pierpont, and
I went to town, and saw the new
10 inch morters and piles of bomb
shells that were placed about the
Soldier's monument yesterday.
I then went and saw major Spenser
about the program of exercises at the
dedication of the Sedwick memorial at
Cornwall Hollow. He sent me to Mr.
Melton who is in the Waterbury shoe
store, who had a program which was
sent him by the Honorable Thoedore{??}
Sedwick Gold of cornwall. I then went
to H.W. Lakes drug store and bought
1 lb. of ground chalk, a small bottle of
glycerine, and 1/4 lb of gum arabic.
We then came home and I then
drove to Arthur Pierpont's at East
Farms, after Mary. The Storrs
Agricultural College extension circle
held their last meeting and a prize
was to be awarded the one who had
the best paper and Mary and Rev. Mr.
Waters of Wolcott were the judges.

5\27\{1900} Sunday
Stayed about home a good share of
the day except that I went to the
trolley car and met Mr. Davenport
and carried him to the Chapel where
he preached. There was a good attendence.
I carried him back to the cars and then
took Father's team which I had home.
Clyde met me there with my own
team, and we went and saw Charlie
Hotchkiss about going to Cornwall
Holloy{??} next Wednesday. We then
came home and ate supper of boiled
chicken. This evening Agness and
Olive Able came and brought their
little baby and played on the organ
several pieces, they then were weighed
and Agness weighed 121 lbs, Olive 122 1/4
lbs and the baby 26 lbs.

5\28\1900 Monday
Worked all day as usual in Rogers & Brother's
factory.
The weather has been very cool to day.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met this
evening for practice, Herman Gessert
presented a bill from his father Herbert
Gessert for cleaning and repairing the
Drum Corps coats and vests which amount-
ed to 14.00 which was approved and ordered
paid.

5\29\1900 Tuesday
Worked this forenoon in the factory.
Came home at noon and got ready to
go to North Goshen, ate my dinner.
Soon Charlie Hotchkiss came and
said that Henry Cook was not going,
so we made arrangement for Clyde
to ride in the two seated canopy top
wagon with George Cass, Rob, and Charlie
Hotchkiss, while Irving rode with me.
We started at two o'clock and went
through Waterbury Center, to Watertown,
then over newly worked roads, which
were soft and dusty to East Morris,
then through Litchfield center to
Goshen East Street which we travelled
to North Goshen, which we reached at
8 o'clock. We soon had our horses put
out in comfortable barn stables, and
Cousin Malachi, and Lillie and Marion
had supper ready, which we ate with a
relish, after which we fed the horses, and
then thought of retiring for the night
as we were quite tired, but Marion
suggested that we sing which we did
till near midnight while she played
on the organ. In the meantime Cousin
Lillie and Mal had got a great supply
of bedding and blankets in the room
which was their parlor and after we had
done singing, at Cousin Lillie's request
I told all the rest to leave the room, while
she and I spread two beds on the floor.
We then retired, Charles Hotchkiss and
Clyde in a bed in an adjoining room
and Rob Hotchkiss, George Cass,
Irving and myself in the beds on the
floor. It mattered not whether we
had a high bed or a bed on the floor
for we all slept sound.

5\30\{1900} Wednesday
This morning we got up at quarter to
four and after folding up the quilts
and blankets we went to the barn
and looked after the stock or rather
the horses. We then went up to
Mr. Thoeren Luddington's and got
permission to use his boats on the
north Pond and also the key to
the little building where they store
the oars {ores??}. We then went to the
pond and took two boats and rowed
to the North end and then started
for the tipping rock about 1/4 mile
distant. We picked some large winter-
green berries, and young wintergreen
on the way. The rock sets on the top
of a large flat ledge, and it is said
to weight 80 tons. It is somewhat the
shape of an egg lying on its side.
By lifting on the long end a little
while it will tip to the East, the
top moving about three inches, and
then by using a very little power
it will continue to rock back and
forth. Robert Hotchkiss had his camera
with him and took a picture of the
rock and all of us on it. We then went
back to cousin Mal's and had breakfast
of fried ham and canned salmon {caned samon??} after
which the boys went out on Beaver Pond
in a boat fishing. Cousin Mall caught
three pickeral that would weigh 3/4 of a
pound each and Rob Hotchkiss caught
one about the same size and another
that weighed 2 3/4 lbs.
We then got ready, and while we
were hitching up to go to Cornwall
Hollow there passed a number of
teams all going too, each of which
was decorated with flags and many
contained an old veteran, dressed in
blue with the cross of the Sixth Army
Corps on his breast. The distance is
four miles, and as we went down
the mountain into the hollow
we could look across the valley
and see long lines of teams
coming from every direction.
We found a place to put our horses
in the yard of a farmer just
North of the Cemetary and then we took
a look at the Memorial, which
consisted of a base of cut granite
about 12 ft. wide by 20 ft. long on
the North end of which stands a mon-
ument about 18 ft. in height and 2 1/2 ft.
thick by 5 ft. at the base.
On the front of the monument is the follow-
ing inscription composed by Dr. William
Welch of John Hopkin's University.
This memorial including ordnance.
Used in the Mexican and Civil wars
And given by the government of the
United States in honor of
Maj. John Sedwick,
Commander of the Sixth Corps,
Army of the Potomac,
Who gave his life for the
Preservation of the Union.
"A skillful soldier, a brave leader, a
beloved commander, and loyal gentle-
man. The fittest place where man
can die, is where man died for man."
On the North side is inscribed a list
of the battles in which General Sedwick
participated,
Vera Cruz,
Cerro Gordo,
Peribla {??}
Cherribusco,
Il Molino del Ray,
Mexico.
Fair Oaks.
Antietam.
Fredericksburg.
Gettysburg.
The Wilderness,
Spottsylvania.
At Spottsylvania May 1 1864 Gen.
Sedwick was killed.
In front of the monument and mounted
upon a large block of granite is a large
howitzer which I should think is 10 ft.
long and would fire a 10 in. shell, while
on each side of the base stands three
piles of bomb shells 10 in. in diameter.
We then went into the little Baptist
Church, and also into the Cemetary
where we spent some time looking about.
Soon we heard the music of a brass band
in the distance and saw a cloud of dust
which told that the procession from the
Rail Road Station at Cornwall Bridge
six miles away was approaching.
A procession was immediately formd
consisting of the Governor and his Staff
officers, veterans of the war of the rebellion,
and citizens headed by the Winsted Band
which marched to General Sedwick's monument
in the Cemetery, where the exercises opened
by a prayer by Rev. W.C. Ferris. The next
was the placing of a garland of leaves
at the foot of the monument by the
Admiral Foot Posts of New Haven,
then General Laurence laid at the foot
of the monument a Rebel battle blag which
was captured at Spottsylvania Court House
by the Sixth Corps, he tore off a strip and
presented it to Hon. J.S. Gold, who was
chairman of the Committee of Arrangements
and is 82 years old.
Then came the decorating of the soldiers
graves by the veterans, while the assembly
moved to the memorial which stands in
the street in front of the Cemetary.
Then came an address by J.S. Gold and
he also presented the memorial to the
town of Cornwall, next Miss Clara
B. Sedwick unveiled the monument
and the Hon. David L. Smith, Chairman
of the Board of Selectment, accepted it in
behalf of the town.
Then the assembly adjourned to a
large two center pole tent where dinner
was served to all.
It is estimated that there were present
about 7,000 people. Free lemonade was
also served throughout the day.
After dinner the speakers assembled
on the platform which had been
erected in front of the Church.
J.S. Gold read a poem which was
written by Mrs. Elizabeth John Vail.
There was also a poem read that was
written by the Rev. Samuel J. Andrews.
J.S. Gold had several letters of regret
from gentlemen of high standing
among which was one from President
McKinley.
Next came an address by his
Excellency George E. Lansbury.
Then followed a speech by Hon.
E.J. Hill, ex-United States Senator.
Also, the reading of letters of regret
from Gen. Miles, USA., Gen. Wilson,
and several other Generals of the
U.S. Army.
Then an address by Dr. Welch.
Next came Governor Pingeree of Vermont
who had come 400 miles to attend
this dedication, he had served under
General Sedgwick in the war.
He was followed by the Rev. Samuel
Seaville of Cornwall, who mad a
spicy address.
Then followed remarks by General
Kent who was an officer under
Gen. Sedgwick in the war.
The exercises were then concluded
by the Band playing several patriotic
selections.
We then went to the Barn and
hitched up our horses and started
for Waterbury 30 miles distant, it
was then about 3:30 o'clock.
We travelled from Cornwall
Hollow up the mountain to Goshen
Center, thence to Litchfield Center, then
down South Street to the Thomaston
Road which we took and came to
Renold's Bridge, then through Waterville
to Waterbury and home, which we
reached at 9:30 o'clock.

5\31\{1900} Thursday
Worked 10 hours in the factory to day.
Mary and I went to the Grange this
evening, it was Chaplin's night and
he, Mr. Garrigus, wished me to read
a poem but the print was so fine I
could not see to read it and I got
Mary to do it for me, and I came
home as I was very sleepy.

6\01\1900 Friday
Worked in the factory to day.

6\02\1900 Saturday
Worked as usual to day, but the factory
did not run.
This evening I went to town to see Mr.
Wallace Camp, about the mortgage on my house.

6\03\1900 Sunday
I did not get up very early this morning,
but when I did, I cut Pierpont's and Raymond's
hair and ate breakfast of boild canned salmon,
after which I helped Irving write an article
on the Rev. John Read who preached in Waterbury
in 1699.
This afternoon my whole family went to
the Chapel to hear the Rev. Mr. Buckley
preach and also to hear his Choir sing.
There were 24 singers in the Choir and
such good singing was never heard in the
Chapel before. After Chapel Clyde went and
carried Mr. and Mrs. Porter home after which
he came back to the Chapel and Mary, Ruth
and Margaret rode home.

6\04\{1900} Monday
Worked to day as usual in the fac-
tory, I went out and worked out
the fence that we are building
between Rogers & Brother's property
and Hamilton Park, after I had
oiled up the shafting.

6\05\{1900} Tuesday
Worked in the factory to day. This
forenoon I went to the Waterbury
Lumber Co. and bought a lot of lumber
for Rogers & Brother's. I also called on
Mr. Wallace Camp to see about paying
him the interest money I owe Mrs.
Catherine Munger on a mortgage
note she holds against me.
Also I called on Mr. Porter Wood to
see about the tuition money that
the State pays for the education
of children in High schools in every
town except Waterbury.
This evening I went to the Chapel
and helped get ready for the straw-
berry festival to be given tomorrow
evening.

6\06\1900 Wednesday
Worked painting roofs at the shop
to day.
This evening I drove my team t o
carry passengers from the trolley
cars to the Chapel, made nine
trips altogether. The festival was a {success??}.
The Chapel cleared about $38.00. Mary
sold ice cream. Mr. John Lines' orchestra
furnished the entertainment which was
of a musical nature and was excellent.
Came home and retired at eleven o'clock.

6\07\1900 Thursday
Working painting the roof's of the
Office and Packing Buildings. It
began to rain at three o'clock and
continued till the present time. It
has washed much of the paint off the
roofs.

6\08\{1900} Friday
Worked painting roofs at the shop
today. The lumber came that I
ordered last Tuesday.

6\09\{1900} Saturday
Worked in the factory to day.
Got through at 4:30 and went to the
Chapel and worked grading and
repairing walk.

6\10\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Rev. Mr. Parry of the Grand Street
Baptist Church preached.

6\11\{1900} Monday
Went to the factory this morning but
Mr. Tobin sent me up to the Brass
Mill to repair the waterwheel so we could
run water over it to help us out.
The wheel is a 34 ft. overshot with 10 ft.
buckets, and was made in 1845, has run
ever since till about 4 weeks ago when
it got clogged.

6\12\1900 Tuesday
Worked to day at the factory paint-
ing the roof over the buffing and
burnishing rooms.

6\13\{1900} Wednesday
Worked in the factory to day.
There is great excitement in this neigh-
borhood tonight over a rape that
has been committed at East Farms.
About 2 o'clock Windola Northrop who
attends school there went out to the
watercloset and after she had entered
a man rushed in and grabbed her and
held his hand over her mouth and
threatened to kill her with a big knife
he had in his hand if she made any
noise. He then raped her and told
her that if she told he would kill
her.
I heard of it at about 8 o'clock and
immediately put the saddle on Jack's
back and in a short time was at
Charlie Browne's house. He told me
about it and soon Mr. Northrop
came. They were going to town to
see Sheriff Rigney. They had all-
ready been to Cheshire, but could
get no trace of the man, who Mrs.
Northrop, who met him on the road
described as rather short and stout
somewhat, with a smooth dark face,
wore a brown hat, and brown coat
and dark pants. When Milan Northrop
and Charlie Brown started for town
I started for Cheshire to see John
Mass who lives at Gilletts Corner
on the Plank Road. I stopped at Ed
Welton's but they had seen nothing
of him. I went on and soon reached
John Masse's, they were in bed but I got
him up and we found that a man
answering that description had been
there at about three o'clock and she
had given him something to eat, and
that he stopped at Mrs. Water's about
one mile East nearly an hour later.
John masse's boy also met him this
side of Cheshire before five o'clock.
Ed Bronson and George Benham
had already been to Cheshire and
they learned that a man of that
description had been at Dunworth's
Hotel and bought a glass of beer
and then went on. They also learned
that there is a bald spot on the top
of his head, as he was passing a
ball that chanced to play from
some boys that were playing
struck his hat and knocked it
off. When I got back I stopped at
Mother Pierpont's and telephoned
to the police headquarters and let
them know that the man had gone
to Cheshire. I then went to Sid
Bronson's and talked with them a
spell, then went to Chas Brown's and
left word for them to tell Milan
and then started for home. I met
Charlie Brown and Milan Northrop
near Wedge's house. They had seen
Sheriff Rigney and he is coming
out in the morning. I then came home.

6\14\1900 Thursday
Worked to day in the factory.

6\15\{1900} Friday
Worked in the factory to day.

6\16\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory this forenoon.
The factory shut down at noon, i.e.
those that were working which in-
cluded the machinists and several
others, the rest of the hands did not
work at all to day.
This afternoon Clyde, Irving and I
went to the Mill Plain Chapel and
worked grading around it and
mowed the grass.
This evening Clyde and I went to
town to see about having boot tops
made for the Mattatuck Drum Band.
We could not find anyone who would
make them.

6\17\{1900} Sunday
Mrs. Thatcher who lives with her
family which includes her husband
and four children in the old Levinas
Warner place on the West Wolcott
Road died last night.
The death was caused as follows.
Several days ago she with her son
had been away with a new horse
and on their return home the boy
threw the reins on the horse's back
as he had been in the habit of doing
with the old horse when he started
and ran away. Mrs. Thatcher attempted
to jump from the wagon and caught
her leg in the wheel which broke it.
It was set about five hours after
but not properly and Friday
night lockjaw set in which caused
her death. She was a splendid woman
and loved by all who knew her.
She is to be buried at Pine Grove
Cemetary tomorrow afternoon.
We all went to the Chapel this after-
noon and heard the Rev. Mr. Bassett
preach.
After Chapel Clyde and I went to
David Henderson's on the West Wolcott
Road and saw Archie about learning
the boys to fife.
We then came home and had supper
and I then went out to Robert Worden's
and then to Charlie Cass' at Marion
where I stayed till 10 o'clock got home
at eleven.

6\18\{1900} Monday
Worked to day in the factory.
This evening I went to see Luther
Bradley about doing some carpenter work
about the Chapel. He was so busy that
he could not do it. While I was riding
out I met Edie Pierpont and she told
me that Sheriff Rigney had caught
the man who assaulted Windola
Northrop last Wednesday.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met
for practice this evening. We marched
to George Cass' and he gave some
lemonade and bananas.
Mrs. John Thatcher was buried in
the Pine Grove Cemetary this
afternoon, the funeral service was
held in the Mill Plain Chapel and
the Rev. Mr. Waters of Wolcott officiated.
The Chapel was well filled, the pall-
bearers were John Gallagher, Arden H.
Cae, George W. Tucker and Wilson Pierpont.
Mrs. Thatcher was 43 years old.

6\19\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

6\20\{1900} Wednesday
Worked in the factory to day.
This evening Clyde and I went to
town and saw Mr. Mellon at the
Waterbury Shoe Store about getting
boot tops for the Mattatuck Drum
Band. He thought he could furnish them
for 1.74 per pair. I also bought a pair
of everyday shoes for $1.50.
We then went to Hotchkiss and
Templeton's and bought two scythes
for 1.50, one scythe for .60, five
lbs. spikes .25, 2 screw hooks .10 and
one emery scythe sharpener .15 cts.
We went to see Mr. Davenport about
coming to Mill Plain Chapel to
preach Sunday, but he was not at
home.
Irving graduated from the eighth
grade int he Crosby grammar school
to day.

6\21\1900 Thursday
Worked to day as usual.
The National Republican Convention
at Philadelphia have to day
nominated President McKinley
and Governor Roosevelt of New York
candidates for President and Vice
President of the United States.
Mary and I went to the Grange this
evening.
Mr. James Porter was taken sick this
forenoon with chills and shakes, they
called Dr. Axtelle.
Irv's 14th birthday.

6\22\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mr. Martelle came to work at
Rogers & Brother's painting.

6\23\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory this
forenoon, shut down at noon.
this afternoon I went to Waterville
to see John Chatfield who is a school
visitor about the tuition fee we
have to pay the city high school.
He was not at home. Then went
and saw Dr. Cook at Waterbury
Center, after supper went and
saw Mr. Chatfield, Mr. Martelle worked
puttying.

6\24\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Rev. Mr. Davenport preached, there
was a large attendance it being
Children's Day.

6\25\{1900} Monday
Worked in the factory to day, unload-
ing a car load of box-stuff that came
from Maine.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met for
practice this evening.
Chas Hotchkiss reported 19.30 in the
treasury. Mr. Martelle worked puttying
and painting.

6\26\{1900} Tuesday
Worked in the factory today.
Mr. Austin B. Pierpont stopped
peddling meat to day, he has
peddled continuously for 31 years to
my knowledge.
Mr. Martelle worked puttying.

6\27\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day turning
posts.
Mr. Martelle worked puttying windows.

7\28\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory painting the
roof on the burnishing shop.
The weather has been very hot and I
suffered from the heat on my head
and considerable from the heat that
came through the soles of the rubbers
that I wore.
About 4 o'clock Irving came and
called me down, and said that the
horse was in the Brass Mill Pond
and drowning, we went there as
fast as we could and found that
they had driven in from the
Brass Mill Road along the North
side of the pond to a place that we used
to call deep-hole and left the horse
by the water where the bank was
very steep while they undressed
to go in swimming, he soon stepped
in and the wagon pushed him
farther out so that he was soon
beyond his depth and the buggy
kept him from turning toward
the shore and he soon drowned.
In his death struggle, he freed
himself from the buggy and
Clyde towed him ashore where
he laid when I got there. I tied
the lines together, and Clyde hitched
the end to the shafts and we pulled
the buggy out. I then sent him to
get Wilson Pierpont to come with his
pair of horses to pull Jack out of the
water, and sent Irving home after
tools to bury him with. Soon Irving
returned and after a while Clyde
andWilson came and we pulled the
horse up on the side hill and dug a
grave, while we were digging it
thundered and lightened, and as
we were turning the horse into
the hole the rain began to fall
in torrents, we partly filled the
grave up and then went home as
we were all wet through. Clyde will
finish filling the grave tomorrow.

6\29\1900 Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
The shop shut down for the usual
summer vacation to night.
Austin B. Pierpont has assigned
Liabilities over $29,000 assets over $15.000
so last night's paper stated.
Austin Pierpont let me take his
drivin horse to use.
Clyde went to work for Arthur
Pierpont to night.

6\30\{1900} Saturday
Worked till noon to day, this
afternoon Irving and I went
to Tracy's lumberyard and
I paid a bill that they sent
for work and lumber bought in
1897 that amounted to $1.53.
I then got some lumber for the
Mill Plain Chapel for the steps
and other repairing.
We did a little work about the
Chapel and then came home.
This evening Irving went to
James Stouells and paid
my school tax which amounted
to $7.00.
They had the annual School meeting
of the Mill Plain District last night
and elected the following officers:
Warren Hitchcock, Committee
B. Frank Hoggett, Clerk.
Mark Pond, Treasurer.
James Stovelle, Collector.

7\01\1900 Sunday
Got up at 8 o'clock this morning, had
breakfast of baked beans, after which
Margaret and I went to Cheshire and
saw Elliott Doolittle about buying
his grass that is standing in his
lots on the Doolittle road. He is to
let me know Wednesday whether
I can have it or not, I offered hhim
$8.00 for it.
He told me that the Doolittle homestead
is to be sold this week. It consists of
the House and barn and 115 acres of
land, except what he owns which is
about 15 acres. From Mr. Doolittle's
we went to Charlie Cass' in Marion
and then home.
This afternoon we went to the Chapel
and heard Rev. Mr. Parry preach,
then went and saw Thoedore{??} Munson
about his grass which he wants to
sell, offered him $10.00 for it.
The weather to day has been nice
and clear.

7\02\1900 Monday
Worked to day at the factory painting
the edges of the roofs.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps met for practice.

7\03\1900 Tuesday
Worked in the factory to day.
The weather was very hot.
Went and saw Theodore Munson
this morning about his grass, but
he had sold it.
To night I saw Thomas Mills and
engaged to buy the grass on the
two lots west of his house for
$10.00.

7\04\1900 Wednesday
This is the One Hundrethand
Twenty-fourth anniversary of the
Independance of the United States,
and should be observed with Thanks-
givings, with bonfires, and with
illuminations.
One cannot help thinkint of the
two little Republicks in South Africa,
i.e. the Transvaalt, and Orange Free
State, who are now at war with
England under circumstances
similar to those of our own Country
in 1776. They with an army of 50,000
men are fighting the force of 250,000
trained soldiers that Great Britain
has sent to conquer them.
But the Boers are perservering
and in the end I hope will be
successful.
Clyde came home last night
from Arthur Pierpont's and early this
morning we started and mowed at
Fourmills, and we mowed most of
the day, till we had the two lots down.
irving mowed some too, the first
he ever did, and towards the last he
kept up and did it well for a new
beginner.
This evening all of us except
Clyde, who went to Naugatuck to
see the fireworks, went out to Robert
Worden's and saw their fireworks,
stayed till about 10 o'clock.

7\05\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to
day painting.
To night after work we got in
two loads of hay and heaped up
the rest, as fast as we could as it
began to rain. Clyde and Irving
set up the posts and made the floor
for a hay stack to day.

7\06\1900 Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
Had charge of a gang of painters and
another gang that were removing the
fence on the North side of the shop
yard.
The boys drew up all the hay to day
from Thomas Mills'.

7\07\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Irving and I went to
town and left an order with Mr.
Melton of the Waterbury shoe store
for 15 pairs of leggins for the Mattatuck
Drum Band.
I then went to Mr. Bottel's store and
bought two scythe whet stones for
.08 cts. and several papers of 8 oz. tacks.
Irving bought some butter and
mustard.
We stopped on the way home and
I paid Henry Byrnes $7.00 towards
a horse I am to buy of him.

7\08\1900 Sunday
Irving and I made a cover for the
hay stack this morning.
This afternoon we all went to the
Chapel. Dr. Rooland who was to
preach did not come, so Morris
Alcott read the Episcopal service.
He made it very interesting.
This evening Mary and I drove over
to her brother Elmer's on Hospital
Avenue, but they had gone away
so we went up to her sister's Mrs.
George Connors at the top of West
side Hill, stayed {staid??} there till after
nine o'clock. Mr. William Ackerman
and his daughter of Jersey City
were there visiting.
Mrs. Eliza Clark Davis was buried
from Mill Plain Chapel last Friday,
she was aged 54 years.

7\09\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory. Had charge
of a gang of painters, and a gang
of men digging post holes and setting
posts. This noon I went to the Fourth
National Bank and had a Check
for $25.00 that Peter Larague gave
me yesterday for a lot of lumber.
\this evening I paid Thomas Mills
$10.00 for the hay I bought of him.
\the Mattatuck Drum Band had
a meeting to night. They voted
to adjourn the meetings till the
15th of August.

7\10\1900 Tuesday
To day the weather has been very
cool for this time of year.
Worked at the factory looking
after many men.
I learned to night that the
Doolittle place has been sold
to Mr. Knapp the Livery
Stable keeper.
This evening Irving and I began
cutting grass on the lot opposite
the Mattatuck which I bought of
James Porter for three dollars.

7\11\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Received my pay for last week's work.

7\12\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day, build-
ing a new fence in front of the Com-
pany's houses that Martain Cunning-
ham and Henry Buckingham live
in.
This afternoon at about 4 o'clock there came
up a sever thunderstorm, the lightning
flashed and the thunder roared as loud
as I ever heard it before, and a good
shower of rain fell, which was much
needed as we have had no rain before
in several weeks.
Irving brought home the horse
that I bought of Henry Byrnes
tonight, I paid $15.00 for it, it
looks poor and thin.
Mary and I went to the Grange
to night.

7\13\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory building the
fence in front of the Company's houses.

7\14\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory painting the
Burnishing and Buffing shop.
After I got home we brought up what hay
we had mowed and put it on the stack.

7\15\{1900} Sunday
Tis hard for me to set myself to
writing my entry in this book to
night, although I am not as tired and
weary as I am many other nights,
but it is hard to begin, I suppose it
is my weakness that prompts me
to feel that it is easier to let it go
undone than to do it.
What I write amounts to but little,
but as I have acquired the habit of
writing every night, and have done it
several years, I feel that I have not
fully completed my day's labor if
I go to bed without writing.
I have fallen fall short of the
object I sought to attain when I first
began to write every evening.
When I was a schoolboy I was consider-
ed an extra good writer, and I now
have a gold pen and holder that I took
as a prize for the best writing in the
school of 60 scholars.
Miss Manervy Webb was the teacher
and the school was in the present
primary school building near the corner of
Cole and South Elm streets the first
year school was ever kept there, 1873
I think.
Hard work, carelessness, and lack of
practice, made me so poor at writing
that I could hardly read my own
letters, so I resolved to write some
every day expecting at the time to
soon regain my lost art, but I
find it has gone forever, for after
two years I cannot wsee very much
improvement.
However I find some of my records
very convenient to refer to, in
regard to facts, dates, etc. etc.
so considering all I think I will
continue to scribble on for the sake
of writing something every day.
This afternoon I hitched my horse into
the two-seated canopy top carriage and
went to Father's and left my horse and
took his and went to the trolley car
at Silver Street and met Mr. Trinkus
of Waterville and a quartette of four
and took them all but two to the
Chapel and they sang at the service.
There was a large attendence, after
the service I carried three of them back
and Willey Garrigus carried the other
two back.

7\16\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day, this forenoon
painting the burnishing building and
this afternoon helping to lay floor in
the machine burnishing room.

7\17\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day laying
floor in the machine burnishing room.
\the floor stuff was 2" wide matched board
maple and matched at the ends, the
first I ever saw that way. It has
been one of the hottest days I ever
saw and I worked tso hard that the
floor was wet with drops of sweat
that ran off from us.
This evening I and Irving mowed
a little while as James Porter's
swamp. He came down and among
other things he told {tole??} me that the
first brass caster at Benedict and
Burnham's was an Englishman
by the name of Green. The first
at Scovill's that he remembers was
a Mr. Benham and later Cealy
Doolittle, the first at Holmes and
Hotchkiss & Brown & Elton's was
Preserved Carter.

7\18\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory at various
jobs. This evening Mary and I
went to town.

7\19\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.

7\20\1900 Friday
Worked at the factory to day paint-
ing Martin Cunningham's house.

7\21\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day
painting the inside of the machine
burnishing room this forenoon,
and getting the mill ready to
start up this afternoon for
Monday.

7\22\{1900} Sunday
The Rev. Mr. Holden preached at
Mill Plain Chapel this after-
noon.

7\23\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day,
caring for the belts, shafting, pipes,
etc. which kept me very busy as
the Mill started up this morning
after a shutdown of three weeks.
This evening we raked up hay and
got in one load.
Mary said that Mr. McKoy who
digs the graves in Calvary Cemetary
told her that he had buried thirty-
six children from the first to the
19th of this month.

7\24\1900 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day getting
Hugh Byrnes' room ready to start
up; this is the plating room.
This evening Irving and I and Mary
got in two loads of hay.

7\25\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day paint-
ing the windows in Mr. Byers' room
which is the machine burnishing room.
Yesterday's paper stated that Henry
Hall, son of the late Nelson Hall,
who is with the Regular U.S. Army
in the Phillipine Islands is dead.
Painters have finished working on
the Mill Plain Chapel and it looks
very good, the colors are gray trim-
med with dark gray.

7\26\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day painting
window sashes in the machine burnish-
ing room.
Irving went to work at Rogers & Broth-
er's to day wiping blanks for John
Rearden at the big drop.
Nellie Connor had a tumor removed
at the Hospital to day by Dr. Axtella
and Dr. Anderson.

7\27\1900 Friday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual, first oiled the shaft bearings
all through the shop and looked the
power over, which I do every morning
to see that all is right, repaired {??} some stream
pipes next, then painted windows
in Mr. Byers' room.
This evening I attended the school
meeting at the Mill Plain School
House. It was called to hear the
report of a committee which was
appointed at the annual meeting to
ascertain the price of putting in a
furnace and making a cellar under
the schoolhouse for the same,
also to lay a tax on the list of
1900,.
The Committee reported that
Wm. Knibbs would build the cellar
for $235.00 i ft. deep.
Gaffeney & Cronan would did
it $287.00 10 ft. deep.
Sam Samuelson $280.00 10 ft. deep
and 250.00 7' deep.
Mr. Disley will put in a furnace
for $220.00 and Barlow Brothers
will put it in for $250.00.
Motion made by Mr. Truiss
that the present Committee
be instructed to put in suitable
heating arrangements as soon as
possible. Amended by Mr.
Atkinson that the expense
not exceed $600.00. "Carried."
it was then voted to recind the
vote passed at the annual meeting to
lay a 10 mills tax, as some thought it
illegal.
Mr. Hoggett then made motion to lay
10 mills tax of list of 1900. Amended
by Mr. Atkinson to 15 Mills. "Carried."
8 voted yes and 5 no, for the amendment
on the original motion 8 voted no and 5 yes.
the District Committee reported
that there is $93,000 worth of taxable
property in the district.
Meeting adjourned.

7\28\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
As Irving and I were leaving the
shop at 5 o'clock this afternoon, Pierpont
who came after wus with the team told
us that there was a man drowned
in the Brass Mill Pond and had
been in the water since 4 o'clock.
We drove up to the ice-houses by
the pond and found that he was
in the water about half way between
the overflow and the mouth of the
ditch. Dr. Axtelle was there and
offered $10.00 to anyone who would
get him out, several boys and
men undressed and dove after
him and finally one found
him in about 8 feet of water about
25 feet from the shore, but they
could not get him to the shore.
Finally a large strong man dove
and got him by one leg and got
him to the edge of the water.
His name was John Ring or Ring-
wood and he was about 85 years of
age I should think.

7\29\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel this afternoon.
Rev. Mr. Hannon of the First M.E.
Church preached.
After Church Ruth and I went in
the buggy out on Southington moun-
tain and up around through Wood-
tick for a ride.

7\30\1900 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
Two men painted the smoke-stack
to day, which is of iron and 90 feet
high, 4 ft. diameter and round.
They first placed a 30 ft. ladder
at the botton of it and then they
had a pole with an S hook tied on
the upper end of it with a cotton
string that they pushed up care-
fully against the side of the
stack and by nailing lengths
on the bottom they made the
pole long enough to reach the
top, the man on the top kept
pushing it up while the man
at the bottom held in his hand
a line the size of a clothes line
which was hung double over the
S hook at the top but he stood
a distance from the stack which
pulled the top out a little from
the top and when the hook was
within about 8 inches of the top
the pole leaned over and the
wind blew it still more and
it fell and broke into several pieces.
They got another pole and tried again
and hooked the hook over the top rim
of the chimney, they then spliced
the end of the line onto a 3/4 inch
rope and drew that up over the S hook
and on the end of this rope they
tied a light pair of tackles which
they drew to the top, on the bottom
end they hooked a seat board on
which one man sat and the other
drew him up and he painted the
stack with a white wash brush
on a handle about 6 feet long.

7\31\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
A strange accident happened last
night, on Doublin Street.
Mr McManus, a contractor, is building
a sewer along the street and they were
blasting with dynamite during the
day, some of the cfharges in the holes
failed to explode, but later blasts blew
the rock to pieces, the stone was given
to Patrick Phalen the police-man and left
in his yard.
About quarter to seven last night Joe,
the son of Patrick, was wheeling dirt and as
he finished, he said to a boy named
Kenneydy, "this is my last load. Come down
to the barn while I put up the wheel barrow."
The Kenndy boy aged 6 years followed
him to the barn having in his hand at
the time a hatchet, and as he went he
picked up a railroad spike which he tried
to drive into a post. Soon the Phalen boy aged
14 years came and looked at the rocks
near by that had been drawn in, and
noticing a hole in one asked young
Kennedy to let him take the spike
and hatchet. He placed the spike in the
hole and struck it about four blows
and then looked at it, while he was
doing this the Kennedy boy stepped
back and turned round. The Phalen
boy struck the spike once or twice
more and there was a terrific explosion
which blew the boy about
thirty feet away but did not hurt
him very much. It knocked the
Phalen boy over back and killed him
almost instantly. It seems that
the hole into which Phalen drove
the spike contained a charge of
unexploded dynamite which he set
off.

8\01\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Irving and I mowed grass near
the pump station to night.
The family of Knopfs who have bought
80 acres of the Doolittle place have been
moving in to day.

8\02\1900 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.

8\03\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory.

8\04\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory.

8\05\{1900} Sunday
Went to the Chapel, Rev. Mr. Faster of
N.Y. preached. Margaret and I went to
Chestnut Hill Reservoir.

8\06\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day. This forenoon
at blacksmith work and flashing up the
roof around the new skylights over the
back passage from the boiler room.
This has been the hottest day of the
year so far.

8\07\1900 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day. This
evening I went to John French's to
see about Bertha going to work in the
spoon shop.

8\08\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Miss Gertrude U. Bradley left to day
for New York to sail for Paris to attend
the great exposition.

8\09\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been very hot.

9\10\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
The casting shop of the Cheshire
Brass Company burned last night,
also the barn at the Benedict & Burn-
ham's Co.

8\11\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day
as usual. The weather has been
very hot, the thermometer standing
at 100 above zero in many of the
rooms. Stayed at the shop till
half past six o'clock shortening the
engine belt, which is twenty-four
inches wide.
Then Irving, Pierpont and I went to
town, and bought one half pk. of clams
a lobster and watermelon.
When we came home we stopped at
Father's and found him a little better.
Frank was there with his new
graphaphone and played several
pieces which I enjoyed.

8\12\1900 Sunday
At about eight o'clock this morn-
ing the weather changed from
hot to cool weather.
I stayed about home all day till
about 5 o'clock when Mary and I
went over to Southington and saw
Charlie Cass. We stayed till after
nine o'clock.
Rev. Dr. Rooland preached at the Chapel
to day.

8\13\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been much cooler.

8\14\1900 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
A bad accident occurred on East Moun-
tain this morning a little before 7 o'clock.
The wife of Mr. Rudolph who lives in
the Thomas Payne place, and her sister,
a German woman about thirty years
of age started for town and soon
the horse started on a mad run.
Mrs. Rudolph was thrown out of
the wagon above the watering trough
and had her arm broken, her sister
clung to the wagon till the foot of
the mountain was reached when
she was thrown out and the back
of her head was stove in, her wrist
was broken as was her middle
finger on the same hand, and
her leg was broken in two places.
The buggy was smashed into kind-
ling wood (it was bought new last
week) and the horse ran to Simons-
ville where it was caught.
Dr. anderson attended the women
and thought they would come
out all right.
Father seemed to be a very little
better to day.
This evening I rode up to John
French's to see about Bertha going
to work at the spoon shop.

8\15\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.
This evening I rode horse-back up
the Doolittle road to the Red Bridges
and back by the Woodtick and
Southmaid roads. I did not enjoy
it very much on account of my
shoes. The style now is to
have the toes of the shoes run to
a point and in order to let a
person's foot in it is necessary to
have the shoes much longer than
they would otherwise have to be.
My toes do not come wihtin
two inches of the toe end {??} of my
shoe, and as the stirrups on
my saddle are of the Mexican
pattern with guards so that
one's foot cannot enter, only
about three inches, the soles
of my shoes bend up and it
is hard to keep my feet in
the stirrups so that riding
is not very comfortable.
I will not buy any more
of those kind of shoes {and he
never did-M. Hall, August 14, 1943.}

8\16\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day and
tonight till 8 o'clock.

8\17\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory till 5:30 o'clock.

8\18\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory till 8 o'clock.
After the power stopped Laurence Tabin
and I put a strainer over a five inch
pipe that takes the water from the
wheel case and distributes it to the
wash tubs about the shop.

8\19\{1900} Sunday
Stayed about home till Brother
Frank came to see me, when we
hitched up and we drove to Mix-ville
and saw where the fire burned the
casting shop, we also went into
the mill, from there we went to
Prospect center, and from there
out the Union City road to Simons-
ville and left frank at Glenn
Street where he lives, and then came
home.

8\20\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
Morris Alcott told me to day that
Major Tucker had sold his place.

8\21\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

8\22\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Called at Father's and saw him, he is
but little better, it will be three weeks
tomorrow since he was taken sick
with the chills and fever, malaria.

8\23\{1900} Thursday
Worked as usual to day.
The weather has been clear and very pleas-
ant. The Connecticut Brigade are
in camp this week at Niantic, it
includes the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th
Regiments of infantry, the Gilford Battery
and I think the colored Battalian.
Mrs. Louise A. Upson, wife of the
late Lucian Upson, died this morning
at the home of her daughter, Miss J.
Henry Garrigus of the South end
of Wolcott, she was 83 years old, and
was remarkable in being a living
daughter of a Revolutionary Soldier,
her Father was Levi Johnson of
Wolcott and lived on the road that
runs East from the church, the cellar
can now be seen near where the
first road turns to the left.
I heard today that George W. Tucker
is going to Massachusetts to live.
Margaret was taken with a chill
this noon, Father is worse to day.

8\24\1900 Friday
Worked at the factory of Rogers &
Brothers to day.
When I came home to night I stopped
at Father's and found him sick with
a chill. In every house from Ashton's
Corner to East Farms people are
sick or have been so within one
month, the cause of this sickness
of chills and fever has yet to be
learned as it was never known
of before last year in this locality.

8\25\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day at the factory.
There was two large plating tubs
brought to our factory from the
factory of Rogers & Hamilton which
the Silver Trust is closing up.
This evening when I came home,
I stopped at Father's and found him
sick with a chill, Dr. Morgan
and Dr. Fitssimons was there
and I had quite a spirited talk
with the Doctor because he did
not do better, he got mad and so
did I so there were two mad ones.
Clyde, Pierpont, and I went to
the Chapel and clipped the grass
with a lawn mower and trimmed up
the edges of the walks and driveway.

8\26\1900 Sunday
Clyde came home from Arthur
Pierpont's where he has worked for
the past 4 weeks.
This afternoon I went to the trolley
car and met the Rev. Mr. Holden
and carried him to the Mill
Plain Chapel where he preached.
I then took the carriage which was
Father's home and was there when
he had another chill which lasted about
one half hour. Had a talk about
changing doctors, Mother is very
set on keeping Dr. Morgan, she said
that I made Father much worse
by talking to the Doctor yesterday
but Father said, when she was out,
that he thought the doctor had
gone to work in earnest, and that
I had made him get a move on
himself, and to let the matter
rest for a few days.
I then came home and had supper
of salmon salad and tomatoes after
which Clyde, Irving and I went
out to the South woods and looked
at some posts and rails that
Clyde cut for the Chapel sheds
to hitch horses to. We then went to
Arthur Pierpont's and looked at a stone
post that Clyde split out.
We then went to the house and
Lucy gave us each a plate of ice
cream, some peaches, etc.
We then came home over the Meriden
Road, which we reached a little before
the nine o'clock whistle blew.
The weather has been extremely hot
all day.

8\27\1900 Monday
Worked to day at the factory setting
plating tubs which were brought
from the Rogers and Hamilton shop.
When Pierpont came with my dinner
he said that Irving had had his
finger cut off. I have since learned
that he and Clyde were drilling a
rock, and Irving was holding the
drill when Clyde missed his blow
and struck Irving on the finger
which was close to the rock as the
drill was in nearly the whole
length and smashed. Mary and
Clyde drove to Dr. Barber's office
and he called in Dr. Castle and
they cut the finger off at the second
joint, it was the third finger on the
right hand.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met
this evening and practiced they
decided to go to Southington to drum
for a Fair to be held Sept. 2nd.

8\28\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day in the factory.
This evening I went to Simonsville
horse back to see brother Frank about
changing doctors for Father, but
he was not at home.

8\29\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the Factory to day.
This evening I went to see Mary
about Father.

8\30\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
The new boot-legs for the
Mattatuck Drum Band came
to day, and this evening Charlie
Hotchkiss, Henry Buckingham,
George Cass and several
others worked on them.

8\31\1900 Friday
Worked to day as usual in the
factory. Several of the drummers
came and worked on the bootlegs.

9\01\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory from 7
till 12:30 and from 1 till 5:30, met
Mary with the team at the Plank
Road where the path from the spoon
shop comes out and rode home
with her. This evening, Clyde, Irving,
Henry and Harry Buckingham
worked on the boot-letgs for the
Drum Corps, till we got them
about finished.

9\02\1900 Sunday
This morning we got up at 7:30
and did the chores, after which I
sent Pierpont down to Martain
Cunningham's with a note asking
him if he would like to go to
Wolcott to look at the Reservoirs that
empty the factories along the Mad River
with water so that we would know how
much more there was in them. He sent
word that he would be ready at noon.
When he came we started and went first
to Chestnut Hill reservoir and then over
Spindle Hill to Cedar Swamp. We found
that the water in Chestnut Hill reservoir
had been drawn down about 12 feet and
Cedar Swamp Pond was lowered about
6 feet.
There are a great abundance of apples
and grapes, but everything is suf-
fering from the dry weather.
The Rev. Mr. Davenport preached at
the Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.
Father slept through the time for
having a chill yesterday and did not
have any.

9\03\1900 Monday
This is Labor Day and is a
legal holiday in this state.
We got up at 5 o'clock and got the
horse and canopy top wagon
ready to go to Southington.
We ate breakfast after which several
members of the Drum Corps arrived
and we started for Charlie Cass'
in Marion, which we reached in due
time. We found that he had a
fine decorated wagon that he was
going to take to the Fair at South-
ington and which we were to
drum for. He hitched two pairs
of horses to it and we formed in
front. There were present Charles
Cass, Harry Buckingham, Roy
Burch, and Clyde Miller, (Fifers;)
Henry Buckingham, and Herman
Gessert, (Bass Drummers)
Irving Miller, Charles
Hotchkiss, George Cass, George
Atkinson, George Somers, Howard
Neal and myself (Snare Drummers)
We marched from Marion through
Mill Dale to the Fairground.
The road was very dusty and the
weather hot. We played nearly
all of the way. The ground is located
on the East side of the main road nearly
one mile North of the bridge over the
Quinnapiac River at Mill Dale.
We marched onto the Fairground
playing the "Russian March."
We seemed to attract a great deal of
attention, and after reaching our
place, were met by the officers of
the association who invited us
to refreshments, which proved to
be soda water, Chockolet, Black-
berry, Sweet Cider etc. etc. after
which we did as we pleased till
noon when we were given our
dinner, which consisted of boiled
oysters, roast beef, pork steak, etc.
They had fine exhibits of cattle, sheep,
swine, poultry, fruit, vegetables, etc.
also good horse racing and
cattle drawing.
We left the Fairground for home
after 4 o'clock and reached Marion
before 6 and left for home about
8 o'clock.

9\04\1900 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Laurence Tobin and
I worked till seven straightening up
a shaft cuplin {??} in Mr. Byers' room.

9\05\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Laurence Tobin,
James Byrnes, James Cahill, Fritz
Snoman, and I worked till eight
o'clock, raising up a spur gear on
the waterwheel shaft, which had
slipped down.

9\06\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Irving told me tonight that Father
is better and sat up to day, and
that Ervis Wright is sick with
the typhoid fever {feaver??}.
This evening Irving, Pierpont, and
I went to the Chapel and began
taking the furnace apart in order
to repair the pit that it sits in.

9\07\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. This evening Irving, Clyde,
and I went to the Chapel and worked
taking the furnace out of the pit
in the cellar.

9\08\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I stopped and saw
Father who is getting along much
better.

9\09\{1900} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Rooland preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel to day.

9\10\1900 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met
this evening and voted in Roy a member.

9\11\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory.

9\12\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the facotyr to day
painting skylights on the roof some
of the time.
At about 11 o'clock the wind began
to blow for the first time in many
days, and increased in violence until
it had blown off many of the leaves
as well as most of the apples, peaches,
and other fruit, it blew down a large
apple tree in Father's yard.
The Mill Plain Chapel gave a
peach festival this evening which
was well attended. The Orchestra
of the Second Church furnished
music which was much enjoyed.
Clyde and I went to see Mr. Kelsey
about Austin Pierpont's account.

9\13\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mary and I went to the Grange
to night.

9\14\{1900} Friday
I worked to day at the factory
of Rogers & Brothers till 5:30 o'clock
when I drove up to the Mill Plain
Chapel and put up a shutter that
the wind blew off from the Shannon
memorial window last Wednesday.
Sam Samuelson came and I made
arrangements with him to fix the
pit that the furnace sits in in
the cellar.
We then came home and ate supper of
succotash after which Clyde, Irving
and I worked on the new blacksmith
shop till near 9 o'clock.

9\15\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day at the factory, we
put in place a large plating tub that
was brought from Rogers & Hamilton's
factory.
When I came home I found Clyde
and brother Frank cutting up the
old apple tree that blew down at
Father's. I stopped and helped run the
crosscut saw to saw off the stump.
We then came home and after supper
worked on the blacksmith shop till
about 9 o'clock.

9\16\1900 Sunday
Got up at 6:30 o'clock and looked over
my old account against A.B. Pierpont,
which I have to make out for the receiver
Mr. Kellogg.
Then did the chores about the barn etc.
till breakfast time, ate breakfast which
consisted of stewed oysters, after which
I tinkered up a little wagon for
Pierpont and read till it was time
to get ready for the Chapel, when
Spenser Monroe called and wished I
would help him get work as he is out of
a job. I told him I would do what I could,
I then went to the Chapel, got there in
time to hear part of the sermon which
was preached by Mr. Bassett of the
Farm Street Methodist Church.
After we got home, Clyde, Irving,
Adolphus Grecter and myself started
out to look at the Southington reservoir.
We met Sidney Spender up by the
Doolittle place and he went with
us, we found the water very low
but everything in good order, we
also visited the old Upson burying
ground in the South East part of
the town of Woldcott, we then went
to Arthur Merriman's to get a drink
of sweet cider, but he had not made
any yet so we came home, from
the top of the mountain near Ed
Holmes' place we saw a building
burning on the hills far across
the valley to the North East.
I think near Kensington. It was
quite dark when we got home, the
boys rode their wheels and I went
Horse-back.

9\17\1900 Monday
I worked to day in the factory as
usual. The Mattatuck Drum Band
met and practiced to night.
The fire that we saw yesterday
from the Southington mountain
proved to be the barn at Miss
Porter's School for Young Ladies
in Farmington Center which was
burned together with 75 tons of hay
and farming tools. The barn was 40x80
feet with a cow shed 24x49 feet; it caught
fire by spontaneous combustion in
a large bin of oats.

9\18\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day at the factory moving
the acid house to make room for the new
addition which they began building
onto the machine burnishing room.

9\19\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Last night at about 9:30 the fire alarm
blew and this morning I learned that
two houses situated on the South corner
of South Main and West Clay streets
were burned.

9\20\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
The government census bureau announ-
ced that the population of the Town
and City of Waterbury is 51,142.

9\21\1900 Friday
Worked to day in the factory as usual.

9\22\{1900} Saturday
Worked to day at the factory.

9\23\{1900} Sunday
Stayed about home all day except
a while this afternoon. I went to the
Chapel and heard Mr. Parry preach.
This evening I wrote a letter to Fred
who is in Detroit.

9\24\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met
for practice this evening.

9\25\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Father went to work to day, but
came home at 4 o'clock and had a touch
of the chills and fever {feaver??}.
Clara French is home sick with the
chills and fever {feaver??}. Mary and Raymond
went to the City this afternoon and
paid to Mr. Camp who is agent for
Mrs. Munger 30.00 interest money.
She then went to Mr. Kelsey's and gave
the girl who was there her and my
accounts with Austin Pierpont.
She then went and saw her sister
Nellie who she found sick in bed
and very weak suffering from an
operatioon which was performed at
the Hospital several weeks ago.

9\26\1900 Wednesday
I worked to day at the factory
putting up a plank work to hold a
wall of earth under the acid houses.
To day is my birthday. I was born
in 1858 and am 42 years old.
I received my pay to day which
amounted to 13.50.
Mr. William Frey died at the Hospital
last night, he has lived in this neigh-
borhood all his life, he is I think about
42 years old.

9\27\1900 Thursday
Worked to day in the factory as usual.
The weather is very warm and the
streams are low and springs, wells, etc.
are drying up.
Henry Buckingham is moving from
the little house opposite the spoon shop
to the house on the East corner of East
Main and Niagra Streets.
This morning I took eighty dollars
which Mrs. Annie Munson sent to me
night before last to Morris Alcott
and he paid it to Mr. Woodruff for
painting the Chapel.

9\28\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
I find that I lost my reckoning for the
past five days by calling the 22nd the 23rd
but I have marked the figures over
which brings my birthday to the 26th
when it should have been the 27th.
Mother is down very sick again.
Father had a chill this afternoon
and came home from the shop at
4 o'clock. Cara is also sick. This
morning Mary and I were awaken-
ed by some one groaning and the voices
of men over on the Southmaid Road.
Today we learned that Mr. Hennisy
came home at about two o'clock, and
found an Italian in his house under
the table. He had a fight with him and
threw him out of the door, the dog
then tackelled {??} him and chewed him
considerable, then they dragged him down to
the Mattatuck Shop and threatened
to hang him to the beam over the gate
and one of them went in after a rope
but instead of getting it he telephoned
for the police, who soon came and
took him to the lockup. This morning
he was tried and sent to the New
Haven jail for 10 months.

9\29\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual, this evening we worked on the
blacksmith shop.

9\30\{1900} Sunday
The Rev. Dr. Anderson preached at
the Chapel this afternoon, after
Chapel Mary and Margaret went
over to West Side Hill and saw Mary's
sister Nellie Conner who is sick.
Pierpont, Raymond, and i went
out on Southington mountain and
saw Mr. Samuelson, we then went to
Mr. H.H. Garrigus' house and saw
him about putting a bill before
the next General Assembly so that
the inhabitants of the town of
Waterbury may have the same privileges
that the people of the rest of the state
enjoy.

10\01\1900 Monday
Worked in the factory to day.
This is town election, the candidates
for Selectmen are John B. Doherty
and George Boughton, Republican;
Mortimer Doran and Mr. Disley
Democrat; only a few from our shop
voted and I think the ballot will be light.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met for prac-
tice this evening, we marched around the
{Sentence left unfinished??}

10\02\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mortimer Doron, Democrat, was elected
First Selectman and Mr. Disley second,
nearly all of the town officers elected
were democrats.
Yesterday morning Hiram Able left
$45.00 when he went by to work for
me to take to the shop and give to
Morris Alcott to pay for the concrete
walk at the Chapel, I gave it to
Mr. Alcott as requested.

10\03\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

10\04\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Mary and I attended the
grange, it is a splendid moonlight evening.

10\05\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
Father did not work to day or yesterday
as he is feeling very weak.
Mother is quite sick with the chills
and fever {feaver??}.
Tonight when I came home from work
I stopped at Father's and he told me that
Mr. Upson saw him to day and told
him that he need not work any
more only to look after things
about the building and dam and
to stay about the factory holidays
and Sundays, and that the Waterbu-
ry Brass Company would pay
him $8.00 per week.

10\06\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Came home at 4:30.
Clyde helped Mary move from the
house corner of Cassett and Walnut Streets
to a house on Coe Street.
Mother is sick in bed to day with chills
and fever {feaver??}.

10\07\{1900} Sunday
This forenoon I went out to Sam
Samuelson's to see when he is coming
to do the work at the Chapel.
Came home and after getting some
lunch I went to the Chapel and
heard Rev. Mr. Perry preach, after
which I came home, and carried Mary
out to her Mother's at East Farms
and I went out to see Morris Bergher
at Prospect.

10\08\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
Ida Baxter died to day with the typhoid
fever {feaver??}, this has happened on her 17th
birthday.

10\09\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day as usual.
It has rained all day {rest of the sentence is illegible??}
have filled a little.
It is said that the Wolcott Fair which
was to have been held tomorrow is
to be postponed on account of the rain.
A Polander boy who worked at the shop
caught his hand in a pair of gears nad
had 4 fingers cut off.
Ida Baxter is to be buried from the
Chapel tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

10\10\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day, it has
rained more or less all day which has
filled the river up so we have all the
water we need to run with at the shop.
The Wolcott Fair was to have been held
to day but was put off on account of the
weather.
Ida Baxter was buried from the Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.
Clyde began his duties at the Chapel
as janitor this day by opening it for
the funeral.
I received my pay at the shop to day
for last week's work, it amounted to
13.50.

10\11\1900 Thursday
I worked to day as usual in the shop.
The weather has been fair and cool, and
the Wolcott Fair has been held, it is said
to have been the largest and best fair
ever held in Wolcott.
Of my family Pierpont and Irving
were all that attended.
Miss Gergrude U. Bradley returned from
Europe night before last.

10\12\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day. This fore-
noon I left the shop and went to town
at 10 o'clock, saw Dr. Danoline{??} about the MIll
Plain School, then went and saw attorney
James Russell chjairman of the town board
of education and left Irving's bill of tuition
then went and saw Porter Woods about
the consolidation of the town and
city government, also met Mr. Carnes,
the city engineer. He was surveying
at the corner of South Main and Grand
Streets where they are repairing the
stone culvert.

10\13\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory this day.
We had a car load of box stuff come
which took us all day to unload, and
we had to stay til near six o'clock to
night.

10\14\{1900} Sunday
Dr. Rooland preached at the Chapel
this afternoon.

10\15\1900 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mother has been up to day from her
bed, Father has been in bed all day
and is very weak.
This evening I went to the City Hall
and attended the joint meeting of the
Selectmen and the town board of school
visitors, among the business trans-
acted was the matter of tuition of scholars
in the high school, the board thought
it a great injustice, but claimed that
they could take no action in regard
to the matter.

10\16\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day as usual in the factory.
Sam Samuelson worked to day on
the pit at the Chapel, he began yesterday.

10\17\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This morning there was a severe frost,
the first we have had this fall.

10\18\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Mary and I attended the Grange this evening.
Mother Pierpont was elected Pomona{??} for the
remainder of the year to fill the vacancy
caused by the resignation fo Mrs. Eddy
who has moved to Greenfield, Ohio.

10\19\1900 Friday
Worked this day at the factory.

10\20\1900 Saturday
Worked to day at the factory.

10\21\{1900} Sunday
Worked to day at the factory from 9 to
2 o'clock. The cause of it was that we had
to change some pulleys on the shafts and
piece a large belt which we could not do
when the power was running.
Rev. Mr. Hannon preached at the Chapel.

10\22\{1900} Monday
Worked to day at the factory.

10\23\{1900} Tuesday
Worked in the factory to day.
The weather has been very warm.

10\24\1900 Wednesday
Worked at the factory, have been very
busy, on account of the big load that
has been added to the engines and water-
wheel, there is 175 horse power pulling
on the large engine, 35 horse power on the
waterwheel and 40 on the little engine
that runs the dynamos and this increased
load causes the belts to brake and
slip.
I learned to day that Austin B.
Pierpont has been discharged from
bankruptcy.

10\25\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
Heard to day that six writs of
attachment has been served on
Austin B. Pierpont, Arthur Pierpont
and Lucy Pierpont, in all amount-
ing to 22,000, by the creditors of
Austin.
Mary and I went to the Grange
this evening, the Grange voted
to have the executive committee
see Wme.{??} Faber who is Trustee and
have him make over the papers
and deeds to the Board of Trustees
which was appointed some time
ago.

10\26\{1900} Friday
Worked to day as usual in the
factory.
This evening I went to the City
Hall and attended the meeting of
the Town Board of School Visitors.
The people of the Oronoke school district
were there in two factions, those
from the "North end" and those
from the "South end," they have
failed to provide suitable accoma-
dations for the scholars, and the
Town Board has cut off their
appropriation of public money which
amounts to 20.00 a week.
I brought before the Board the
matter of having to pay $10,00 per term
for each of my boys in the high
school, and they assured me that
they would have the matter brought
before the Legislature.

10\31\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day as I have every working
day since last Friday, have been
very busy and at night tired and
sleepy, and up late together with poor
health have kept me from making
my usual entry in this book at night.
Rev. Mr. Davenport preached at Mill
Plain Chapel last Sunday.
Last night I went to a Republican
rally at Polis Theater, Mr. Bruce and
Samuel J. Fessenden spoke to a
large audience.

11\01\1900 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. I received a telephone message
from Rathbun of Hartford stating
that the sound foney association of
Hartford wished the Mattatuck Drum
Corps to play in the parade to be
given in that city next Saturday,
but as our letter heads read that we
had 21 men when in reality we only
have 16, he did not know about hiring
us until he had consulted the rest
of the Committee. He said he would
telephone later, as he did not telephone,
I went to the Mattatuck shop this
evening and called him up nad
he told me that he had written me
to the effect that we were engaged
at our own terms i.e. 18.00 and expenses
that we are to go on the train that
brings the Torrington League and pay
our own car fare which will be 1.08
and also pay for our own dinner which we are
to have in New Britain, we are to
play for the Harford Current
at the head of a procession of about
100 men, and the Honorable Joseph
Hawley will follow us in his automo-
bile, and to present them our bill
after the parade is over and they will
pay it. I immediatedly sent Clyde
down town to notify the boys
there, and George Cass and I went
to Marion to get a Bass Drum
and to notify Charley Cass that
there would be a meeting of the
Drum Band tomorrow night.
I am going to bed at 11:30.

11\02\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum Corps
met and made ready to go to Hartford
tomorrow. We had a lot of hard work to
keep everybody good-natured and make
the clothes fit. Herman Gessert did not bring
his pants and I had to go to his house and get
them which makes it 11:30 bed time.

11\03\{1900} Saturday
Got up this morning at 4 o'clock and Clyde
and I went to the spoon shop, and we oiled
up the shaft bearings which took over an
hour, we then came home and ate our
breakfast and got into our uniforms and
started for Spenser's Feed Store where we
were to meet at eight o'clock, all were on
time and we marched down East Main Street
through Bank and Grand Streets to the
depot, where we waited nearly an hour when
we were put into a passenger car which
was hitched onto the Torrington train when
it came and we started for Hartford with
13 cars, we did not stop till we reached New
Britain and there we waited quite a spell
and we got out and strode about the
place and looked at the new soldier's mon-
ument, after which we went back to our
trian where they brought us hot coffee and
sandwiches, at 11:45 we started for hartford,
we got out at the Asylum Street Station
and went immediately to the Current's
office on State Street where we were obliged
to wait about an hour and while we
waited we went and looked at the steam
fire propeller, and also at the Connecticut
River, we soon started and formed in
the line and marched I should judge about
7 miles, there were 16,000 men in the parade
and 50 bands and 50 Drum Corps.
After the parade we went to the train and
each had a bag of lunch given him and hot
coffee, we reached Waterbury at 6:30 and marched
to Henry Gessert's taylor rooms on Bank
Street where we broke ranks and payed
each of the boys their expenses, but kept
the remainder till Monday night.
The names of those who went were Charles
Cass, David Wall, Clifford Keaton, Clyde
Miller, harry Buckingham, and Roy Birch,
fifers, Bury Young, George Somers,
and Herman Gessert, Bass Drummers,
Irving Miller, George Atkinson, George Cass,
Howard Neal, Charles Hotchkiss, and
myself, Snare Drummers.

11\04\1900 Sunday
Stayed home till about 3 o'clock, Frank
came after me as Father's horse was sick. I
went down and found him all right, but
Mother is much worse and Father no better.
Ira wanted us to get together and decide
on some plan for to help the old folks along
so Will Gillette went and got Mary Jenner
and we decided to change doctors.
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel to day.

11\05\1900 Monday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps had a meeting at which David
Wall was voted in a member.

11\06\1900 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This has been Election day, the factory
shut down from 12 to 2 so as to give
the men a chance to go and vote.
I left the shop at 1 and got back at 2
o'clock, after I had voted for McKinley
for President of the United States
and McLean for Governor of Conn.
both candidates on the Republican
ticket.

11\07\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Dr. B. Art. Ward moved from his house
opposite M. Tuckers to town to day.
The returns fo yesterday's election show that
William McKinley is elected President and
Theodore Roosevelt Vice President of the
United States and that George P. McLean
of Simsbury is elected Governor of Conn.
Edward O. Keeler is elected Lieutenant Governor.
Willie Garrigus and Fannie Hitchcock are
married this evening at the bride's home
on the Meriden Road, I suppose, as they were
to be.

11\08\1900 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
There is a great scarcity of water I never
knew so little water in Mad River.
The City is repairing up the old pump
station on the Plank Road and expect
soon to pump the water from the
river into the City water pipes.

11\09\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
The first snow of the season fell to day.
it has fell at intervals during the
whole day and at times the ground
was covered so as to be all white.
Mary went to Ansonia to visit cous-
in Emma Drew.

11\10\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening the boys and I went to
the Chapel and put in the cold air
pipe to the furnace.

11\11\{1900} Sunday
This day has been rather cold and
damp. The Rev. {illegible??} preached
at the Chapel to day {illegible??}
minister from {illegible??}
church.
This evening Margaret and I went
to Bucks Hill and saw William Faber
and family.

11\12\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory.
there was a large parade in Bridgeport
to day 20,000 men in lne, it being the
100 anniversary of the organization of the
town, Mattatuck Drum Band met to
night for practice.

11\13\{1900} Tuesday
Worked to day at factory.
There was a school meeting at the Saw
Mill Plains school house this evening at
which I attended. They voted to have the
Committee Clerk, and Treasurer look up
the matter of consolidation with the
other committees of the town, Mr. Hitch-
cock resigned and wished me to act
for him.

11\14\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day as usual. This
evening we put down the oilcloth
in the sittingroom and put up the stove.

11\15\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening a party from Mill Plain
which included myself and wife went
to Waterville on the trolley cars and
attended the fair given by St. Paul's
Episcopal Church.
Miss Olive Able went to work at Scoville
last Monday

11\16\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factoyr to day as usual.
This evening Albert Spender and I
went to the Selectmen's office and saw
Mr. Doran about consolidation and
also about paying tuition matters, he said
he would be obliged to see the Town attorney.

11\17\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day, got
through work at 4:30 and came home
stopping on the way to see Father and
Mother who are sick with the malaria.
After I got home the boys and I worked
building a forge in the blacksmith shop
but did not complete it.

11\18\{1900} Sunday
This morning I got up at 7 o'clock and went
to work at the shop putting in an iron drip
tub in the plating room. Laurence Tobin
and I worked at it till 9 o'clock when we
had it finished, after which I came home
and rested till noon, after which I got ready
and went to the Chapel and heard Rev. Mr.
Hannon preach, theirewas a fair attendance.
The weather to day has been very nice, and
many people were out. Willie Garrigus and
his bride were to the Chapel, they returned
from their wedding trip to New Jersey last
Thursday.

11\19\{1900} Monday
Worked to day as usual.
Father had a severe chill yesterday and
Will Gillette went and told Frank and he and
Rolland Jenner got Dr. Rabbinis to attend him.
Father likes him very much.
The fifers of the Mattatuck Drum Corps
met here for practice this evening.
It is now raining and it is much needed
as the streams are very low.

11\20\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at factory to day.
Went to Brass Mill and got Father's
pay for him which I left with him
to night when I came home from shop.
He had a chill to day.
This evening I went to Mr. Mark Pond's
house and there met Mr. Frank Hoggett
and Warren Hitchcock, and arranged to
see the committee of the several school
districts of the town in regard to
consolidating the City and Town
Governments; came home and wrote
a letter to mr. William Milton and it
is now 12 o'clock.

11\21\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Dr. Parry of the Grand St.
Baptist Church gave a lecture in the Mill
Plain Chape, Subject the Laughable Side
of Life. I and every member of my
family attended.

11\22\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange, Mr. William Faber was there.

11\23\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Warren Hitchcock, B.F.
Hoggett and myself drove over to
Oronoke district to see Mr. William
Johnson the School Committee in regard
to consolidating the Town and City
governments. He was not at home but
his wife told me that we would find
him in Watts Saloon. We then went
and saw Mr. Rasmussin, Committee
of the Town Plot district but he was
in bed, we then came to the center
and found Mr. Johnson in Watts'
Saloon on South Main Street playing
cards. He told us that he would
call a meeting of the voters of the
district and would also make out
a list of the School expenses for the
last 5 years and give it to me.

11\24\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Clyde and I went and
saw Mr. Rassmussin at Town Plot.
He said his district is much opposed
to consolidation and he has called a
school meeting to be held next Satur-
day evening.

11\25\{1900} Sunday
The weather is cold and went, Pierpont and I
went to Marion this forenoon to tell Charlie
Cass that the Mattatuck Drum Corps was
to turn out tomorrow night, it was after
three o'clock when we got home so I did not
go to the Chapel, but the rest of the family
went.
Mary and I went down to sister Mary
Jenner's and there met Frank and Gussy,
his wife. We agreed to pay the hired woman
7.50 her wages due, and to divide the sum
among us, Frank, Fred, Mary, Iva, and
myself, to pay.
I wrote to Fred in Detroit and told him
of it.
Rev. Mr. Holden preached at Chapel.

11\26\{1900} Monday
Worked at factory to day.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum Corps
played for Wodham's Post G.A.R. to
advertise an entertainment that they
gave in the City Hall, it was a lecture "The Battle
of Gettysburgh" and was illustrated by maps
and views on canvas reflected by a calcium
light.
Bought 1 ton of coal to day of F.J. Wood
for which we paid 6.75.
Mary received a lot of stationary from
the Waturbury American and commenced
corresponding for the paper tonight
under the head of Mill Plain.

11\27\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory. Went to bed early.

11\28\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Warren Hitchcock and myself
drove to Waterville and saw Mr. Edward's
and Mr. Wolf who are Committees of the
Waterville School district about opposing
consolidation of the Waterbury town
and City governments. They said
that they would call a school meeting
and get the opinions of the people.

11\29\{1900} Thursday
This day is Thanksgiving and
there is no work.
This morning I was ready at 9 o'clock
when Warren Hitchcock came and we drove
to Simonsville to see Mr. Whightman the
Committee of the School there, but he was
not at home, we then went to South Brooklyn
and saw Mr. Green, the committee of that district,
he said that he would call a meeting, but
thought that they would favor consolidation.
We then went and saw Mr. Wills com-
mittee of Bunker Hill district, he too said
he would call a school meeting and that
they were very much opposed to
consolidation. We then drove to the
center where I left Warren and he came
home while I went to Uncle Joseph
Somers' house on East Clay Street
where were assembled Father, Mother,
Uncles, Aunts, and cousins, to
the number of fourty-nine and we ate
Thanksgiving dinner, after which I
walked to Simonsville and saw Mr.
Whightman and he told me that
he had a petition handed him this
morning to call a school meeting, and that
the people of Simonsville are much opposed to
consolidation. I then returned to Uncle Joe's
where we had ice cream in the evening,
and listened to brother Frank's gramophone.
We then went to Uncle Goldsmith's at the
East end of Clay Street and saw a lot of
Chinese and other foreign money, and
many curiosities from China, Japan, the
Phillipine Islands and other places that
he had sent home, he is at present in
the engine department of the United States
Transport Meade which left San Francisco
for China a short time ago, this will make
his second trip to China.
We then came home. Clyde and Irving walked
and the rest of us rode in the two-seated wagon.
Mrs. John Frey of Mill Plain died last
night aged 68 years.
This ends the entering of records in this book
which is the third one I have filled.

[[end of Journal Book]]

[[new journal starts here:
November 30, 1900 to April 21, 1902
Charles S. Miller
Waterbury, Conn.
Mill Plain District]]


11\30\1900 Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This morning Constible Rametti came to
the factory and sommonsed me to appear
at the court of Common pleas (criminal side)
to be held in New Haven next Monday {monday}
morning at 10 o'clock,
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange. Yesterday was Thanksgiving.

12\01\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I saw Town Clerk Brett about
drafting a bill to be brought before the
incoming Legislator {{illegible word}} Waterbury
on an equal footing with the other towns
of the state, He said that he would do
all that he could about the matter, and
soon he brought Mr. Gilfoil the newly
elected Democratic Representative, who
wishes me to call at his office,
I then went and saw George Driggs at
his home on West Main Street . He is
Secretary and Treasurer of the
American Pin Co. of Waterville and
he told me many things about con-
solidation that will be useful to me
before this campaign {campaigne} is over.
I then went to my team which was hitched
by the North side of the green and there met
Mary and Margaret who had been to hear
Pro Russell read at St. Margaret's school and
then we came home. I remember it, an
anniversary of something.-M.H.

12\02\1900 Sunday
We attended divine service at the Chapel
this afternoon which was well filled.
Rev. Mr. Perry preached, taking for his
subject "The girl in the home".
In the evening I called on William Purdy,
Miles Payne, and Gilbert Hatchkiss
on East Mountain.

12\03\{1900} Monday
This morning I got up at 4 o'clock and
Clyde and I went to Rogers and Brothers
factory and oiled up the shafting. We
then came home and I ate breakfast
and got ready and took the 8, 12 train
for New Haven where I arrived in due time
and reported at the Court {Cort} House where I
stood with the rest of the jurors but as
4 prisoners pleaded Guilty and another
was sick, and for other reasons still
other cases could not be heard Judge
Stdley excused us till 10 o'clock next
Monday morning.
I then took a walk out Orange street and
East Rock to the Soldiers Monument
which I ascended by 106 steps which
wound round a center column in a spiral form.
After I came down I took the trolley
cars back to the green after which I
ate dinner and then went to the
historical rooms at 144 Grove Street,
where I looked at the old curious things
after which I walked to the depot where
I took the cars home.

12\04\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

12\05\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day
This evening Warren Hitchcock, B. F.
Hoggett and myself went to Wolcott
and heard Sec. Hine of the state board
of education speak on public libraries.
The meeting was held in the church at
the center.

12\06\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went and saw Mr. Frank
Gilfoil the newly elected representative to
the General Court, and made arrangements
to have the law amended {amenden} regarding
the tuition of scholars in the outlying
districts who attend the high school in
the City of Waterbury. He seems very
glad to take the matter up.
I then attended the town meeting
at which it was voted to divide the
Oronoke school distrcit according
to the report of a committee which had been
appointed for that purpose.
They also voted to call the south end Oronoke
district and the North end Park Road district
Number 11. Meeting then ajourned.
I then went to Simonsville and saw Mr.
Webster who keeps a drug store there and
who I had heard was working against
paying his tuition for his boy, but
he was not as earnest as I had hoped.

12\07\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day, this evening
I attended the school meeting at the East Farm
school house where they appointed a
committee consisting of George Benham,
Sidney P. Bronson, and Arthur J. Pierpont,
to meet with the committe appointed
by the districts to oppose consolidation.
Mary went to the Grange fair
which was held last night and to
night.

12\08\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
The boys went and chopped wood at James
Porter's woods at East Farms for the first
time to day.

12\09\1900 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Lewis, assistant minister of St.
John's episcopal church preached at Mill
Plain Chapel to day. The boy choir of the
same church did the singing. The attendance
was the largest I ever saw at the Chapel at
a regular meeting.
The weather is very cold tonight.

12\10\{1900} Monday
The weather to day is cold, thermometer stood
3 degrees above zero this morning.
Clyde and I got up at 4 this morning and
we went down to the spoon shop and oiled
up the shafting after which we came home
and ate breakfast, and then I started for
New Haven. Pierpont carried me in the
spindle buggy to the trolley cars at
Silver street and then I rode to Nauga-
tuck on them for which I paid 10 cents
then I took the steam cars to New Haven for
which I paid 75 cents. I met on the cars Mr.
Samuel Wilson of Wolcott who was to serve
on the jury also. We went to the county
court house and had to wait till noon
when they called us up into the court
room and discharged us as there was no
case to be tried. Judge Studley of the
court sent us to the clerk and he paid
us off. I received 12.96 for mileage {milege} , and wages,
for two Mondays.
Mr. Wilson and I went to the First nations
Bank and got our checks cashed, and then
went to Childs restaurant {restaurent} and had dinner
for which I paid 25 cts. We then went to
the Conn experiment station where we
stayed till 4 o'clock when we took the
trolley cars back to the center and I
rode out to Brtanford on the new
trolley road which is just completed.
Came back on the next car and it was
dark and cold. Took the 7.50 train
home which I reached at 9.40 o'clock.

12\11\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather this morning was very cold.

12\12\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

12\13\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I attended the
Grange, it being the election of offciers
the following were elected.
Harry Coe Master, Warren Hitchcock
Overseer, Girtrude W Bradley Lecturer,
Adelbert Hitchcock Steward, Charles
Hotchkiss Assistant Steward, Wilson
L. Pierpont Chaplain {Chaplin}, John Todd Treasurer
Anna Hall Secretary, Lewis Hitchcock
Gatekeeper. Mrs. Mary Pierpont {{Pamona??}}
Mrs. John Todd {{Ceries??}}, Mrs. Thomas
Fairclough {{Flora??}}, Edith Pierpont Lady
assistant Steward. B. F. Hoggett executive
committee.

12\14\{1900} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening the boys and I made two
pots of saurkraut {saurcraut}, then the boys and
Margaret and Ruth went to Frosts pond
skating.

12\15\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

12\16\{1900} Sunday
This morning Pierpont and I drove
to Wolcott to Mr. H. A. {{Narton's??}} to see
if we could buy a hog, but he had none.
We then went to Charles {{Minars??}} one
mile North of the center but he had
none and did not know of any. Then
came home.
This afternoon went to the Chapel
which was largely attended. Rev. Mr.
Wrimner of Simonsville preached.

12\17\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The weather to day was has been very cold.

12\18\{1900} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Last Satursay yhe Mail carrier for the
first rural distrcit in this part of the
State began his duties. His route is
out the plank road to the pump station
then up the river road to the Southmaid
road by the Mattatuck shop then over
the Southmaid road to the Woodtick road
to the Stilson road which he travels to
the Pritchard road, then back to the
Mad River at the twin bridges and
up the Woodtick road to the Merritt
Seat place, back to twin bridges and
down the Doolittle road to our corner,
then out Cheshire road to East farms
schoolhouse, up to Meriden road, out
Meriden road to the road that goes to Woodtick
over which he passes, and at Woodtick
West to the West Wolcott road and
down to Mark {{Warriers??}} corner and
back up to Browns corner, west
over Chestnut hill to Bucks hill School
house and down through Piersollville
to the center of Woodbury.

12\19\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory.

12\20\{1900} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange.

12\21\{1900} Friday
Worked as usual.
This evening I went to the Chapel
and worked with others in trimming
it with evergreens for Christmas.

12\22\{1900} Saturday
Worked at the factory. This evening
I attended the meeting of the Committee of
the School districts of the town at the
City court room in the City hall to
take measures to oppose consolidation.

12\23\{1900} Sunday
Dr. Davenport preached at the Chapel
and the orchestra of the second church
Sunday School furnished the
music for the singing. The Chapel
had more people in it than ever before
at a preaching service; there were more
than 200 present.

12\24\{1900} Monday
Worked at the factory to day. The
making and polishing and trimming
rooms were shut down for their
vacation. They paid off this afternoon
and I received 13.50 for last week's work.
This evening the boys and I went
to the Chapel and prepared it for
Christmas.

12\25\1900 Tuesday
This day is Christmas. The first
thing the boys and I did after
they had enjoyed their presents
was to work shingling the
blacksmith shop partly after which
we went up in Mrs. Frost's lot
and got a Christmas tree and
took it to the Chapel and set it
up. We then came home and went to
Father's where all of my brothers and
sisters were met with their children to
eat Christmas dinner, after which in
the evening they had a Christmas
tree and many presents were given.
We also enjoyed some nice music and
Fred sang sveral selections. He and
Addie came from Detroit to spend
Christmas here.

12\26\{1900} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This afternoon I left the shop and
went to town and bought a present
after which I came home and went to
the Chapel and helped trim it up.
At 7:30 the Christmas exercises
opened with readings, recitations,
singing, etc., after which the presents
were given out to the scholars of the
Sunday School {sundayschool} by Santa Claus {cloths}
The Christmas tree looked very nice
when lit up with little wax candles
and trimmed with shiny balls and
{{brade??}}

12\27\1900 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. The Grange had a Christmas tree
this evening, and there was a large number
present. Mary and the children attended
but I stayed home and went to bed.

12\28\{1900} Friday
Worked to day as usual.
This evening I went to see Mr. Gilfoil
about bringing a bill regarding tuition
before the General assembly. He thought
that it was unnecessary as the revised
City charter would cover it. I then
went to Bunker Hill and saw Mr. Wells
about it; found him at the Chapel there
where they were having a Christmas tree
and exercises. He thinks consolidation
will be fought to the end. I then took
a trolley car home.

12\29\1900 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. This evening the Mattatuck
Drum Corps had a meeting and
brother Fred was present and gave
an exhibition of fire drumming.
He is the best drummer that I
know of.

12\30\{1900} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Anderson preached at
the Chapel to day.

12\31\{1900} Monday
This is the last day of the nineteenth
century. I worked at the factory as
usual.
This evening Clyde, Irving, Mary,
and I went out to Jacob Henry Garrigris'
and witnessed the marriage of their
daughter Bessie to Arthur Joseph
Pierpont. The ceremony was performed
in the parlor by the Rev. Dr. Davenport
of the second congregational church
at 8:30 o'clock. Mortimer Pierpont and
Jessie Garrigris acted as best man
and brides maid. There were about sixty
five guests present. They received many
presents which included 2 clocks, 2 stands,
an easy chair, spoons, ladles, trays, pictures,
pillows {pilows}, holders, and many other things.
Several who were there went to Waterbury
center to see this century out, and the new
one begin. There is to be lit on the green
36 electric arc lights, the band is to play
and also the chimes and other exercises are
to take place.
Arthur and Bessie are going to leave
at 11 o'clock for Meriden where they intend
to take the express train for Boston and
are to return Wednesday.
Mrs. John Alexander died yesterday
afternoon aged 84 years.

1901
Twentieth Century

01\01\{1901} {Tuesday}
This day was issued in by the ringing
of bells, the firing of cannon. displays
of fireworks, music, the shouting of
men, and a grand illumination of
the green by electricity.
There was watch meetings in
the Methodist and St. John's Episcopal
churches, which ended at 12 o'clock and
which was attended by an immense
throng of people. Service also opened
at midnight in the church of the
immaculate conception and other
catholic churches.
This has been a general holiday.
The stores, banks, and businesses
Generally has been suspended.
I did not work at factory.

01\02\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual; received my pay at the
usual time this afternoon.
Mrs. Jane Welton, half sister of
David Porter, died at Mr. Porter's
home yesterday afternoon at
6 o'clock, aged 82 years. The same
afternoon at about 7:30 Mr. Timothy
Porter of Stamford aged 75 died. He was
half brother of Mrs. Welton.
The Ladies union had a supper and
entertainment at the Chapel this evening.

01\03\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mr. Charles D. Hine,
secretary of the state board of Education,
gave a fine lecture which was illustrated
by {{calcicum??}} lights views. The subject
was cities of Northern Italy, principally
Venice.

01\04\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather is cold and clear, the
travelling excellent.
The ice men have cutting.

01\05\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory.
This evening the Mill Plain Choir
met at my house for practice. There
were present Morris Alcott, Harnald
Lanton, Charles Hotchkiss, Inez Beckswith,
George Cass, and Edward Hutchens.
The girls that sing did not come.

01\06\1901 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Buckley of the Trinity church
Preached at the Chapel to day.

01\07\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Yesterday there was a stabbing {{affray??}}
on the John D. Johnson's pond down on
East Main street. It seems that the boys
stole wood of some Italians who live
near the pond to build a fire on the ice.
The Italians remonstrated, but the boys
heeded them not, till the Italians, father
and son, tried to drive them away. When
the boys set upon the son with their
shiny sticks, skates, etc., the father
came to help him and a general fight
began and the boy drew his knife and
stabbed three of the boys and the rest
ran, but soon returned and the Italians
retired to their house opposite the new
Hendrican school. The police soon came
and arrested them and they are mow in
the lockup. The condition of the boys who
were stabbed is: two are in a critical condit-
ion and the other is able to be about.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met this evening.

01\08\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The school at Mill Plain opened this morn-
ing, with Miss F. May Fatem teacher in
the primary room, Miss Daisy Falmage
teacher in the middle room and Mrs.
Barlow in the highest room.
Yesterday Pierpont had a bad accident
happen his hand. He was on Frost's pond
and slipped and fell just as a boy named
{{Greeter??}} came along on a bicycle {bicicle} he put
out his hand to push away the wheel when
it caught between the chain and sprocket
wheel which nearly tore the index finger
apart at the first joint. He came home
and Mary took him down to Doctor Bartier
who did it up. He is now getting along
very nicely.
Cousin Marion Gillettte of North Goshen
was married New Years day to Mr.
Samuel Ovaitt [Oviatt] of Goshen center.

01\09\1901 Wednesday
Worked aat the factory to day as usual.
This evening I went to see Mr. Gilfoil
but he was in Hartford at the opening
of the Legislature {{Legislator}}. I then went to the
town clerk's office and saw Mr. Brett
about drafting a bill for Mr. Gilfoil
to present to the General Assembly.
Then I went to Porter Woods' office
and got there petitions against
consolidating the town and City
governments, and came home and
directed one send to Warren B. Hitchcock
of Mill Plain district, one to George
Benham of East Farms district, one
to Miles Payne of East Mountain
district.

01\10\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening it is very icy and
it still rains and freezes as it falls.
Mary went to the Grange.

01\11\1901 {Friday}
Worked to day as usual at the factory of
Rogers & Brother.
Everything is coated thick with ice and
a little snow fell which has made very
good sleighing.
Many of the old trees are broken down and
many of the small ones have broken
branches causes by the great weight
of ice.

01\12\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Irving and I went to
the Town Clerk's office and copied records
of the present Tucker place at Mill Plain.

01\13\{1901} Sunday
This morning I gor up at 8 o'clock and
cooked the breakfast of stewews oysters
after which Raymond and I drove to
William Pritchard's in wolcott. In
many places the trees were bent across
the road and in some cases it was hard
to get through.
This afternoon Dr. Parry preached at the
Chapel. There was a large attendance.

01\14\1901 Monday
Worked to day at the factory.
This evening I went and saw Representative {Representive}
Gilfoil about bringing the tuition bill
before the Legislature {Legislator}.
I then attended the meeting of the commit-
tees of the outlying districts held in
the city court room at City hall to
oppose consolidation. The special
committee appointed to procure attorneys
reported that they could not retain
{{Grager??}} of Durby or Warner of Woodbury
but that they could get Green Hendrick.
Some of the district committees could
not engage to vouch for the pay which
would amount to $300.00 until they
had reported back to their district
which would take till next week and
it looked as if the thing would fall
through till I and our committee,
Warren Hitchcock and B.F. Hoggett,
gave our personal security for out
districts share, and so reported
when several other committees agreed
to do the same and Mr. Hendrick was
engaged.

01\15\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Clyde, Irving, and I went
to Mrs. Theodore Munson's and got
her cook stove and carried it over
to the Chapel and set it up in the
place of the one already there.

01\16\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory as usual.
The Ladies Union of Mill Plain
gave a supper and entertainment
this evening which was in charge
of the young ladies. The supper was
good, and the entertainment fine.

01\17\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. This evening Mary and I
attended the Grange. The newly
elected officers were installed and
she is now {{Ceries??}}

01\18\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. This evening Harry {{Stilbourne??}}
called and we figured up our old
accounts and found that I owed
him 33.00. I payed him 7.00 leaving
a balance of 26.00 now due.
There are many cases of the Grippe or
influenza about here now as there are
all through the Eastern part of the country.
100,000 cases are reported in New York City.

01\19\{1901} Saturday
Worked to day in the factory as usual.
The weather has been very cold.
I went down town to night expecting to
attend to some business but it was
so cold and windy that I came home
as soon as I could. The thermometer stood at
2 degrees below zero when we got home and
the wind was blowing hard.

01\20\1901 Sunday
Mr. Garrison of the Farm Street church
preached at Mill Plain Chapel to day, he
is a local preacher.

01\21\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
Queen Victoria is very sick at Orsbourn
in the Island of Wight. Her death is
expected at any time.

01\22\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to the City
hall and saw Mr. Brett, the town
clerk, about the petition to be brought
before the General Assembly.

01\23\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day
as usual.
Queen Victoria died last night at
6:30 o'clock at the age of 82 years.
Her death was caused, it is thought
by many, to be due to worry over
the reverses and defeats of the
British army in South Africa which
the small army of the Boers seem
to be beating.
I was {{a boating??}} on
Jim Porter's swamp.
Louis Monroe & Frank
Wright & Lena Hespalt
ere there.

01\24\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.

01\25\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to Wolcott and saw
Evelyn Upson who is Representative from
that town to the General Assembly to
find out how much longer the Legislature
will receive new business, and also
to talk on consolidation matters.
He told me that the time expires the
15th of next month and gave me much
other information.

01\26\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening saw Town clerk Brett.
Selectman Doran and Representative
Frank P. Gilfoil about having a tuition
bill drafted.

01\27\{1901} Sunday
Henry Nalson Hall was buried to
day. He died June 17th at Manilla,
Philipine {Fillipine} Islands of malaria fever.
He belonged to Co. L. 21, United States
Infantry. Had previously served in
the 9th infantry against the Indians
in Calefornia, Arazona, and New-
Mexico; also in the late Spanish
war and was at the charge on San
Juan hill July 2nd, 1898.
When he died they buried him at
Manilla and since cold weather
the Government {{disintered??}} the
remains of three hundred soldiers
including Hall and brought them
to San Francisco on the transport
Grant, and Hall's remains were {was} sent home
which they reached last Wednesday
afternoon and were taken in charge
of by undertaker Wake.
The funeral was held from the under-
taking rooms of the Boston furniture
Company this afternoon and was
attended by Companies A and G,
C.N.G., and a great concourse of
people. They marched with the funeral
train to the Mill Plain Chapel
which was filled to overflowing and
many had to stand outside, while
the cemetary hill was covered with
people. Dr. Davenport preached the
funeral sermon and the choir sang
three very appropriate hymns. After
the service the funeral formed in
front of the Chapel. First a military
guard of 16 men commanded by a
Seargent bearing rifles on their shoul-
ders, then the hearse, and six infantry
men pall bearers. Three walked on
each side of the hearse, then came
the hacks and carriages carrying
relatives and friends and then
{{obay??}} 100 soldiers without arms
marched two and two. At the grave
the military men formed in a
circle enclosing the grave, the mourn-
ers standing within the circle.
After the remarks and prayers by
the minister, three {{vellies??}} were fixed
by the guard over the grave and
the bugler played the "taps" which
ended the funeral service.
The remains were enclosed in a heavy
oak casket which was in a heavy box
made of 1 1/2 " fine plank bound with
band iron.
On the end of the box was marked
Henry N. Hall. Co. L. 21st U.S.
Inf. on a card which was pasted
on was the following
Manilla P.I.
Nov. 19th, 1900
I certify that Henry N. Hall, Late.
Sergt. of Co. L. 21 Inf. U.S.A. died of
Malarial fever at Manilla on June
18th, 1900, and that his remains have
been placed in a proper hermetically
sealed casket, and that their removal
will not endanger public health.
Charles Syrech
Capt. Ass't. Surgeon U.S.A.
For Board of Health.
Henry N. Hall was son of the late
Nelson Hall.

01\28\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory.
This evening the pipes of the Mattatuck
Drum Corps met for practice.

01\29\1900 Tuesday
Worked to day. This evening I went
to town and saw Mr. Gilfoil about
presenting my tuition bill before
the Legislature. He says that he
will present it tomorroe.

01\30\{1900} Wednesday
Worked to day.

01\31\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. Saw by this evening's
paper that Mr. Gilfoil presented
my tuition bill before the General
Assembly.

02\01\{1901} Friday
Worked as usual to day.

02\02\{1901} Saturday
Worked as usual to day.
This evening Mary and I went
to town. I went to the town clerk's
office and looked up some old records
and then saw the Selectman.
Queen Victoria of England is buried
this day.

02\03\1901 Sunday
This forenoon Clyde Irving, Pierpont
and I went to the Chapel and swept
it out, built fire, and got it ready
for service this afternoon. Then
Pierpont and I went upon the
North end of Long hill to see
where the district line between the City
of Waterbury and the Bucks hill district
runs. When we got home it was too
late for Chapel service so I lay down
and had a nap.
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Chapel.

02\04\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
It has snowed most of the time to
day and there is now about 10 inches
on the ground and it is still snowing.
George Somers and Roy Birch came
to night to attend the Drum Corps
meeting but we had no meeting, so we
stayed and Clyde made an ax handle
and I a vice bench.

02\05\{1901} Tuesday
Worked in the factory to day as usual.
The weather has been Cold, windy and
the air full of snow.

02\06\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

02\07\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to the Grange.

02\08\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual. The
weather has been very cold for the
past three days.
Clyde worked this afternoon helping
Wilson Pierpont cut ice. It was
seventeen inches thick.

02\09\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day. The shop
closes at 5 o'clock Saturdays and as I
work 1/2 hour at noon. I get out at half
past four.
Irving met me at the shop with the
team and I rode home after which
we shod the horse. She kicked like
fun and Irving and Clyde held her
at the nose with a pair of tongs.
The choir of the Mill Plain Chapel
met here this evening to rehearse the
hymns they are to sing to morrow.
There were present Mr. Hutchens, Harold
Lanton, Charlie Hotchkiss, George Cass,
Morris Alcott, Hiram Able, and Frank
DeBisop, bass and tenor, Bertha French,
Ida Spender, Clara French, Cara Miller,
Agness Able, Annie Munson, alto and
soprano, and Inez Beckwith organist.

02\10\{1901} Sunday
Weather very cold and windy, but
the sleighing is good.
Rev. Mr. Holden preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel. There was a good attendance
considering the weather.
After supper Margaret and I drove
to George Sprague's on East Mountain
and saw Miss Jennie about playing
at the Chapel next Wednesday evening
at the Fair. She said she would come
if we sent after her.

02\11\1901 Monday
I worked in the spoon manufactory
of Rogers & Brothers, on Silver street,
to day.
This evening Mary, Clyde, Irving,
and I went to the Chapel and with
others who were there built the
booths that are to be used st the
fair for the sale of goods. We worked
there till ten o'clock.

02\12\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather to night is very cold.
Mary, Clyde, and Irving went to
the Chapel this evening to get it
ready for the fair tomorrow evening.
Mary and Clyde have now (9 o'clock)
got home, but Irving is yet there
waiting for Mr. Walker to tune
the piano.

02\13\1901 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This has been the coldest day of
the winter so far. The wind has
blown a gale and the thermometer has
stood about zero. This evening the
fair at the Mill Plain Chapel opened.
I went and got there a little after eight
and stayed till after nine when the
entertainment was over. When I came home
the entertainment consisted of
music on the piano by Miss Jennie
Sprague and Myrton Judd; Recitations
by Pearle Fairchild, a girl by the name
of Pullen and a little boy, a dialogue
by George Sills and My daughter
Margaret, and several songs.

02\14\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been windy and cold
though not so bad as yesterday.
This evening the orchestra of the Young
Men's Christian Association are to furnish
the entertainment and Clyde with
Father's two-seated wagon and Irving
with my two seated wagon and Mr.
Warden with his two seated wagon
have gone to the Y.M.C.A. building
to meet them and bring them out.
I intended to go to the fair, but I
now think that I will not.

02\15\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather is a little warmer, so that it
has thawed some.
The springs and streams are very low.
We have had no rain since christmas
and but little since the early part
of last summer.
This evening Clyde and I set three
window panes, one in my room,
14X28", and two in the North West
bed room, 14X26".

02\16\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening the boys and I chopped
wood till supper time, and after sup-
per we worked in the shop till nine
o'clock.

02\17\{1901} Sunday
The weather to day has been nice and
warm. The boys and I went to the
Chapel this forenoon and got it
ready for service.
When I was coming home I met
Miles Payne who had come to see me
about a wood saw arbor. I showed it to
him and he took 49 {{??}} of steel stake
holders. Father came to see me about
Fred and money matters pertaining
to his board which is long past due.
I got ready to go to the Chapel but it
was so late I backed out and stayed at
home. This afternoon Clyde, Irving,
Pierpont and I went up and looked
at the piece of woods that Mr. {{Knapp??}}
has beeen cutting off East of Frost's
pond, and east of Hiram Able's house.
Mary told me that Rev. Mr. Hannan
preached at the Mill Plain Chapel this
afternoon. This is his last Sunday there as
he is soon to move to Brooklyn, N.Y.
to take charge of a large church.

02\18\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The dust house got on fire this morning.

02\19\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Weather has been nice and warm.

02\20\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
There was a surprise party given by the
young people of Mill Plain on Arthur
Pierpont and his wife last evening.
There were about 40 present.

02\21\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mary went to town to day and
reinsured my shop for $1000.00 for
one year fpr the premium of 27.50
in the agency of J. G. Jones.
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange. {{Miles??}} Bradly was
installed Lecturer.

02\22\{1901} Friday
Worked at factory.
This is Washington's birthday and
is a holiday. The banks, schools, etc.,
are closed.
I raised the flag on the pole upon
Rogers and Brothers' office in honor
of the day.

02\23\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.

02\24\{1901} Sunday
This forenoon I went to the factory
and worked till 1 o'clock, refraining
a clutch and belt on the main
shaft.
The weather has been cold to day
so after I got home I staid there
except that Mr. Warden came
and got me to go up to Munson's
corner to look at his wagon which
broke down with him as he was
going to the Chapel.
Mr. Lewis of St. John's Church
preached at Mill Plain Chapel.

02\25\1901 Monday
Worked to day at the factory.
This evening I went out to get
signatures on a petition against
consolidation of the City and
Town governments.
Went first to Mr. Mcloy's, then
Thomas Mill's, thence to Mr. Andrew's,
then to James Porter, then Albert
Gillette, then Mr. Tyler, then Paul
Hesphelt, then Mr. Hennessey, then
Mr. Gillette, then Mr. Barbour, then
Mr. Beckwith, then Mr. Anderson,
then Lewis and Old John Frey,
then Hiram Able, and then home.

02\26\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the facrtory to day.
This evening Pierpont and I started out
with the petition against Consolidation of
the Town and City governments of
Waterbury. We went first to Mr.
Batchelor's on the plank road then to
Mr. Carlson's on the Southmaid road,
then to Mr. Atkinson's on the Wood-
tick road then to Mr. Sherman's and
Mr. W.H. Woodinge opposite the school house
then to M. F. Fairchild's, then to Frank
Welton's then to H. M. Judd's, then to
Edward Baldwin's, then to John
Thackerie's, then to H.H. Hulbert's
on the Frost road, then to Wm.
Atkinson's, then to Albert Spender's,
then to J. L. Jones, then to Frederick
Reel's and Thomas {{Holms'??}} on the
Meriden Road, then home.

02\27\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening is the supper and en-
tertainment at the Chapel. It is
in charge of the young men, all of
my family are there except me.

02\28\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange.
They had a debate; The subject of which
was, Is it right for the United States
to take from the Philipinos their
Islands. For the Affirmative were
Mr. Lewis Garrigus and Senator
Garrigus of Indiana, Negative, William
Lyler and myself. Time did not
permit of my speaking only for a
short time.

03\01\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory. At the time
of the fire someone did not shut off
the main valve of one of the four way
hydrants {hidrants} and it froze up. We had to
dig down by it and built a little {{fre??}}
and throw it out.

03\02\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

03\03\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Parry Preached at Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.
There was a good attendance.
Mr. Koot of Waterville drilled
the choir for the first time
last night at Inez Beckwith's.
This evening Margaret and I
went to Wolcott and saw Evelyn
Upson.

03\04\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
I wrote a letter to Attorney Porter
Wood, requesting an interview
some evening.
This day President McKinley
is to be inaugurated President of
the United States for the next
4 years.

03\05\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather this morning was very
cold and windy.

03\06\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening all of my family attended
the lecture given by Dr. Parry at the
Mill Plain Chapel. The subject was
Quo Vodis and it was illustrated by
{{sterioptican??}} views. The attendance
was small owing probably to the
cold weather.

03\07\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I attended the meeting
of the committees of the outside
school districts at the City hall
to prepare to oppose Consolidation of
the Town and City governments
of Waterbury.
The Town has engaged Joe Barbour of
Hartford to work in the Legislature.

03\08\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Clyde, Irving, and I
worked in the blacksmith shop till
after 9 o'clock.
The child of Theodore Munson was
buried this afternoon. Rev. Mr. Daven-
port officiated. He (the child) was one year old
the 16th of February.

03\09\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.

03\10\1901 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bentham of Waterville preached
at the Chapel this afternoon. His choir of
St. Paul's church came with him and
joined with the Mill Plain choir which
made the singing better than we ever
had at an Episcopal service before. They
numbered altogether about twenty six
singers.

03\11\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
It rained all night and the river
was quite high this morning.
There was a leak in the embank-
ment of the ditch at the shop and
Tom Keegan and I with sledge and
chistle cut through the frost and
repaired it which took till noon,
The river rose seven inches between
10 and 12 o'clock. When we returned
to the shop the high water had obliged
the engineer to take the main belt
off from the engine, so the people
were sent home. About two o'clock
the water began falling and I put
the belt back on again and got things
ready to start again in the morning.
This evening Irving, Clyde, and I made
a heavy pair of hinges for the black-
smith shop doors.

{03\12\1901 Tuesday [no entry]}

03\13\1901 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Our boy Pierpont was taken very sick
yesterday and last night he was very
sick. Mary staid up with him all
night and I was up a part of the time.
To day we had Dr. Barber call and see
him and he said he had a bad attack
of influenza but he thought that he
would come out all right. He is much
better now but still breathes very
hard.

03\14{1901} Thursdayt
Worked at the factory to day.
Ex President Benjamin Harrison
died at 4 o'clock this morning.
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.

03\15\1901 Friday
Worked to day at the factory to day.
Mr. George B. Cantor died yesterday
aged 54 years.

03\16\{1901} Saturday
Worked at factory to day.
This evening I went to the Town Clerk's
office with Michael Cass of Silver Street
to find out what we could about his
property. I then went and saw Mr.
Gilfoil, the representative to the Legisla-
ture regarding the tuition bill which
is now before the house.
It seems that the towns of Middle-
town and Wattingford are in the
same condition as Waterbury, and
have to pay a large tuition to the
highschool by the parents of the
children who attend. There has been
one hearing already, and there is
soon to be another.

03\17\{1901} Sunday
Mr. Waters of Wolcott preached
at the Mill Plain Chapel this
afternoon.

{03\18\1901 Monday [no entry]}

{03\19\1901 Tuesday [no entry]}

03\20\1901 Wednesday
Worked to day in the factory as
I did yesterday and the day before.
I have not made an entry in this book
since last Sunday night, which is due
to my not feeling well, and after my
day's work was over and opportunity
offered I went to bed sick and tired.
Monday evening Mary and
I went up to Mr. Able's and spent the
evening. The occasion was a gathering
of the neighbors which Mr. and Mrs.
Able had invited in honor of Miss
Agness 22nd birthday. There were about
thirty present and we had an enjoyable
time. Last night I went to bed early.
Mary and Irving went to a Lecture
down to the highschool.
News has come to day that the Boers
in South Africa have rejected the
terms of peace offered by the British
Government and they intend to
continue fighting. May they fight
until they conquer and gain their
liberty.

03\21\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.

03\22\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
There is a party and dance this
evening at John French's house
which Bertha and Clara have got up
as they are to move over into Charlie
Monroe's house next week.

03\23\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory till eight o'clock
this evening.
The Mill Plain Chapel choir met at
my house this evening to rehearse the
hymns they are to sing tomorrow.

03\24\{1901} Sunday
Although to day is Sunday I worked
in the factory from 9 o'clock toll one
refraining the main shaft, water wheel,
etc., work that could not be done when
the mill was running.
Rev. Dr. Davenport preached at the Chapel
this afternoon, and the Second Congregational
church. Sundayschool orchestra played for the
singing.

03\25\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory this day as
usual.

03\26\1901 Tuesday
Worked this day at the factory of Rogers
and Brother on Silver Street.
It has rained nearly all day.

03\27\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to the Town clerk's
office and copied titles to Michael Cass's
property on Silver Street. I then went
to Judge Camel's office and saw rep-
resentative Gilfoil who told me that
the bill making the amount of the
tuition fee that the state will pay
for educating town scholars in
highschools $30.00 instead of 20.00 as
here to before, per year, and that my
bill will not be brought up before
April 9th.
I then came out to Mill Plain
Chapel and brought home my
family. The supper was given
by the married men and they
cleared about $17.00.

03\28\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory this day.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange. In the early part of the evening
they had a debate on the Philipine question.
Those who spoke in favor of our government
were Lewis Garrigus and Professor Davis
G. Porter. Those in favor of the Philipine
people were David Hotchkiss of Prospect,
William Tyler of Bucks hill and myself.
Soon after nine o'clock the young people had
a masquerade dance.

03\29\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
School closed in the Mill Plain
School to day for one week's vacation.
Aquinaldo, President and leader of the
Philipine Government and forces,
was captured by General Frederick {{Funston??}}
last Saturday.

03\30\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory till half past four
when I came home and shod the horse and
repaired the shafts on the farm wagon.
School closed at Mill Plain yesterday for
one week's vacation. The teachers are
Miss May Fatern of Hartford in the
primary room, Miss Talmage of Prospect
in the intermediate room, and Miss
White of Middlebury in the highest
room.

03\31\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Fletcher of Oakville preached
at Mill Plain. Chapel was well-filled.

04\01\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
The wind blew very hard all last night
and has blown all day.
This evening several members of the
Mattatuck Drum Corps met for practice.
They were Roy Berch, Dave Waugh,
Harry Buckingham, Irving, and myself.
I received a card by mail to day an-
nouncing the wedding of Mrs. Anna
Hall and Wilson L. Pierpont, which
is to take place April ninth.

04\02\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to John Wokelie's
to see a horse that I am thinking of
buying. I did not see it as Harry
had it to the shop where he works.

04\03\1901 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
It has rained hard all day.
This evening the boys and I worked in the
blacksmith shop making a latch for the
door, after which I came in and worked
carving the seat of a chair.

04\04\{1901} Thursday
Worked at factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the Grange.

04\05\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This is Good Friday but I had to work
putting in a big gear.

04\06\1901 Saturday
Worked at factory to day.

04\07\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Parry preached at Mill Plain
Chapel. This is Easter Sunday and
the service was very interesting; it
included considerable singing.
This evening Margaret and I went to Evelyn
Upson's.

04\08\1901 Monday
Worked at factory to day.

04\09\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory.
This evening I attended a meeting of
the committee at City hall that are
opposed to consolidation and arranged
to go to Hartford and oppose it before
the committee on Citys and Boroughs
tomorrow. Nearly all of the committees
are going by way of the Highland
division of the Consolidates road
at a price of 100 up and return.

04\10\1901 Wednesday
This morning Irving and I went to
the shop and oiled up the shafting.
The weather was rather wet. We then
came home and ate breahfast, and
then with Clyde started for Hartford.
We drove to Marion and left our team
at Charlie Cass's and then took the
trolley cars al Mill Dale and rode
to Lazy Lane for which we paid
five cents. From thence we rode to
Plainville on the trolley cars of the Connecticut
Light and Power Co. (previously we had
been riding on the Southington and
Meriden Company's cars.) for which
we paid 20 cts. At Plainville we took
the cars on the new third rail system
of the Highland div. which are the
only third rail cars in the World
except one line in Mass. and Rhode Island.
They glided along very swiftly and we
were soon in Hartford. The fare was 20 cts.
We went first as we had plenty of
time to the Wadsworth Athneum and
looked at the fine paintings by Trumbell
and the other paintings and relics.
We then went and viewed the Conn-
ecticut river which was very high, the
water almost touching the East Hartford
bridge. In East Hartford many of
the houses were in water up to the
windows.
We then went to the Capitol where
the hearing on consolidation was to
take place in the Supreme Court room.
The city was represented by lawyers
Chas. Root and John {{Kellogg??}}, the town
by Lawyers Brackelsly of Hartford,
Carmody, Wood, Kendrick of Waterbury,
and Joe Barber of Hartford.
The City called Lawyer Terry, the
Mayor of Hartford, Mr. Jenks of
Waterville and one or two others,
to testify in favor of Consolidating the
Town and City governments.
The town called to the stand the committees
of the several school districts, namely
Thomas Miles Payne of East Mountain,
Mr. Edwards of Waterville, and several
others, when it was too late to call more.
I will say here that the hearing also took
place yesterday.
We left Hartford st 6 P.M. by third
rail and came home the same way that
we went.
The Ladies Union had a supper at Mill
Plain Chapel this evening.

04\11\1901 Thursday
This morning Irving and I went to
the shop and oiled the shafting.
After breakfast I started for Hartford,
drove to Marion, the walked to Mill Dale,
and then took trolley to plainville and
thence by trolley cars to New Britain
and Hartford, fare 33 cts to Hartford
from Mill Dale.
I went immediately to the Capitol and
at 2:30 the hearing began. There were
several called who spoke against consolidation,
including myself. I took the 6 o'clock
third rail car out of Hartford to Plainville
and came home.

04\12\1901 Friday
This morning Clyde, Irving, and I went
to the shop and oiled up.
I then came home and May and I
started for Hartford, driving to Mill Dale
and there took the trolley to Meriden
fare each 15 cts, then took the steam cars to
Hartford fare each 40 cts. We went immedi
ately to the Capitol and heard the lawyers'
pleas for and against Consolidation.
They were finished at nearly two o'clock.
We then went to the top of the dome
where we could see a great distance in
every direction. The Connecticut river
was high, the waters overflowing the
lowlands and down the valley.
After looking about the Capitol building
we went to Calinder's restaurant and had
dinner, after which we went to the {{Atheneran??}}
and from there we took the New Britain
trolley cars and came home by trolley to
Mill Dale and drove the rest of the way.

04\13\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

04\14\1901 Sunday
Rev Dr. John G. Davenport preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.

04\15\{1901} Monday
Worked at factory to day.
The weather has been cold and wet all day.
This evening several of the young men of the
neighborhood expected to give Wilson Pierpont
and his new wife a serenade.

04\16\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

04\17\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day. This
evening the boys and I worked making
a heavy latch for the blacksmith shop
and then whitewashed part of the West side
of the cellar.

04\18\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange this evening.

04\19\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
Thomas Hill's girl, aged twenty years, was buried from
the Chapel this afternoon.

04\20\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This afternoon after work, Clyde, Irving,
Frank, P and I went to the Chapel and
raked off the grass and trimmed about
the walks, also fertilized the grass and
rolled it down, after which we came
home and ate supper of beef soup and
Clyde went to the Chapel and opened it
for the choir rehearsal, but they had none
as it rained very hard. Mary and I went
to the City and bought a lot of groceries
and provisions. We returned home after nine.
It rained hard all the time we were gone.

04\21\{1901} Sunday
It rained hard all night and this morning
the river was very high. The brook in
the lower end of our lot was so high
that it flowed over much of the ground
in a great pond.
Clyde and Irving went to the Chapel
and pumped the water out of the furnace
pit and built a frire and had things ready
for sunday school and service, but it rained
so hard that no one came but Inez Beckwith
and Henry Cass. We, Clyde, Irving, Ruth,
Frank, Pierpont, and I stayed till after three
o'clock, when we came home and ate supper
of fried shod and scalloped{{escaloped}} oysters.
After supper Irving and I went to the
Spoon shop and saw that everything was
all right for running in the morning.
The water was the highest it has been in
years. We then drove to the Brass mill
and found the water ready to run over
the grovel dam. We drove and told Father
who has charge of the dam there, and he
gave us some shovels and a pick and we,
with Will Gillette, went there and raised
the bank about a foot higher. It was
quite dark when we were done.
We then came home.

04\22\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been wet and cold.

04\23\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather is cold snd rainy.
Fritz Hanson is moving from the
Ashton place to the Edward Scott farm
on the old Prospect Road.
Wilson Pierpont is also moving his new
wife's goods from her house, the one next to
Grange Hall, to his place at East Farms.

04\24\1901 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
It has rained all day.
This evening the Ladies gave a supper and
entertainment at the Chapel.

04\25\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to
the Grange.
This is the 29th day that it has rained
in succession.

04\26\{1901} Friday
I worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been cool and clear.
Wilson Pierpont has been moving his
wife's goods to his house to day and
Clyde has been helping him this afternoon.
Mary, Clyde, and Irving have gone to
a party at Albert Spender's this evening
to surprise Miss Ida this being her
twentieth birthday.
Irving and I plowed the East garden this
evening.

04\27\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

04\28\{1901) Sunday
Rev. Mr. Lewis preached at the Chapel to
day.

04\29\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day. The weather
has been rather warm.

04\30\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The bill consolidating the town and city
governments passed the house to day by
a large majority so the Waterbury American
says.
We had a little shower this afternoon.

05\01\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Planted onion seed to night, my first
planting.

05\02\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange. This is neighbor's night, and there
were present about 186 members present.
They came from Cheshire, Prospect,
Southington, one from Whigville, one from
Bristol, several from Plymouth, some from
Watertown, one from Middlebury, and
a large number from Beach Valley.
There was also present State master Patterson
of Hope Grange of Torrington, and State
Overseer of Weston.
The program was good but very loud and
the supper did not end till near one o'clock
this morning.

05\03\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\04\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\05\{1901} Sunday
This has been a nice warm day. The buds
on cherry and plum trees are about to
burst into blossom.
Rev. Mr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain Chapel
to day.
After chapel Margaret and I went for a ride
over the Long hill road and across the new
Pond at Lake-wood thence up Bucks Hill
and past Wm. Tyler's farm with its large
peach orchards to the highest point on
on the road where we turned East and went
to Mr. John Bishop's where there is a high tower
built for observation. This is the highest {{illegibleword}}
in Waterbury and from this point could be
seen Ivy mountain in Goshen, Mt. Tom in
Litchfield, Mokath mountain in Cornwall,
the Hanging mountain in Naugatuck, Middle-
bury center and many other places. There
were several fires in the woods in the distance,
the largest of which was to the Southward
and seemed to be in the neighborhood of
Mark Warmers. When we came home we
came across wincum bridge and past
Buckshill school house and down North
Main Street to Cherry to East Main and
home. At the corner of Dublin Street we
saw the fire that we had seen from the
tower and it seemed to be near the Brass
Mill. At Wolcott street it looked as if it
was North of East main St. At Ashton's
corner we thought that it was my shop
as it was directly back of Mr. Wright's house
but when we got to my sho we saw it was
in Cavalry Cemetary about a dozen rods
South of my house and there was a large number
of people at work putting it out.

05\06\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\07\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The Carpenters are out on a Strike for eight
hours work and two dollars and a half per day.
They have been out since the first of May. Several
of the contractors have given in to them, but
some say they will not.

{05\08\1901 Wednesday [no entry]}

{05\09\1901 Thursday [no entry]}

05\10{*08}\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
50 machinists struck at the Waterbury Clock
Co. to day because the company discharged
two men who belonged to the machinists
union.
The strike of the carpenters is ended,
The Master carpenters agreeing to give
them 8 hours after Nov. 1 at 10 hours' pay.

05\11\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Irving, Pierpont, and I went
to the Chapel and cut the grass with a lawn
mower and trimmed the edges of the drives
and walks.

05\12\1901 Sunday
This morning Laurence Tobin and I went
to the shop and repaired the governon and
gate to the waterwheel, which took us till
half past one o'clock.
I then came home and ate dinner and soon
Mr. Howard Wright, a medical student who
attends a college during its terms and works
in the vacation, at present at the factory,
came and we hitched up and we drove to Marion
where we looked over several ploughed pieces
of ground in search of Indian arrow points
we finally drove to compounce pond looking
all the way but failed to find any.
We drove partly around the lake and out
onto the road at the South end then taking
the road west we went up the mountain
to Wolcott and then home.
Mary told me that the Rev. C. E. Bentham
of Waterville preached at the Mill Plain Chapel
this afternoon.

05\13\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps met for practice. There were but
six members present, but there were a large
number of boys and visitors.

{05\14\1901 Tuesday [no entry]}

05\15\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory yesterday and
all night, 23 hours in all continuously.
Mr. Bloomfield's son-in-law died and
Mr. Bloomfield, who is the regular watch-
man, had to be out and I took his place
and got home at about half past seven
this morning.
Mrs. Ashton, widow of Richard, died
yesterday morning, aged 79 years. She
is to be buried in the Pine Grove
Cemetary. She lived in her own house
corner of the Meriden and Cheshire roads.

05\16\1901 Thursday
Watched at the factory last night.
At 6 o'clock I had to make a round of all
of the rooms and close the doors and
windows. In making a round I had
first to go into the pipe room and insert
a key in a circular lock which connected
two electric wires which were connected
with a clockwork in the main office
which punched a hole in a paper dile so
they could see that the watchman went
his beat all right. From the pipe room
I went to the men's burnishing room and
there turned the key then to the further
end of the firls burnishing room, then
through the stock room to the
North end of the shipping room, using the
key every time, then to the main office
then up the office stairs to the room over
the office, then to the east die sinkers room,
then to the packing room, then down stairs
and through the {{slackend making??} rooms to the west end
of the polishing room, then back and to
the girls inspecting room, then to the trimming
room then up stairs and through the long
room to the west stairs down and back
to the polishing room then through the muffle
rooms to the belt turning off room,
then back to the satin room the place of
beginning. I had also to keep steam up in
the boilers, had to make a round every
hour from six at night to five in the
morning.

05\17\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

05\18\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory.
It is expected that many of the machinists
of Waterbury will strike monday for nine
hours time and ten hours pay.

05\19\{1901} Sunday
There was no minister at the Chapel
to day. It was Methodist sunday but
William Garrigus's committee failed
to get one, so the service was led by
Hiram Able, and consisted of lesson reading,
singing and prayer.

05\20\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This is an eventful day for Waterbury.
There are over 800 machinists on strike
and nearly all of the machinists are out
from Holmes, Booth, & Hayden's; The Ring Co.,
Blume and Atwoods, The Farrell Foundry
and Machine Co., The Waterbury Machine Co.,
Manville Bros., The E. J. Manville Co.,
Randolph & Clows, Blake & Johnson's,
Steel & Johnson's, The Waterbury Clock Co.
and others.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met for
practice this evening.
Mary has gone to Prospect to a grange
meeting with Wilson Pierpont and his
wife.

05\21\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
There are about 500 of the 800 machinists
out on strike. It is estimated that
there 50,000 machinists in the United
States on strike.

05\22\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory.
This evening we had a meeting at the
Mill Plain Chapel of which I was chairman
and the following officers were elected for the
coming year. Morris Alcott, Episcopal
committee, Charles S. Miller, Congregational
committee, Hiram Able, Methodist
committee, and Robert Worden, Baptist
committee, Arthur Pierpont, Secretary,
Hiram Able, Treasurer,
Al Judd, Sunday School Superintendent,
Henry Cass, Librarian, and Inez
Beckwith, organist.

05\23\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
MAry and I attended the grange this
evening.
Mr. John Leines engaged the
Mattatuck Drum Band to play for
the Veterans of the Civil war next
Decoration day at 1:00 each man.

05\24\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\25\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
I received by Adams Express to day from
New York a set of nine volumes of
Redpaths history of the world, which I subscribed
for a week ago, the price of which is 35.00 to be
paid for in installments of 2.00 a month to
John Wanamaker of New York. I paid 1.00 when
I subscribed.

05\26\{1901} Sunday
I got up at 5 o'clock and fed the horse and
got ready and had Mary put up some lunch
after which I drove to the corner of Walnut and
Orange streets and met Howard Wright
and we drove to Pines Bridge. We were in
search of Indian history and Indian relics.
We went through the Cemetary at Pines
Bridge. The oldest grave stone bore the
date of 1797. We heard of an Indian burying
ground on the West side of the river.
We found it located on the West side
of the Rail Road about three-fourths
of a mile south of the main road that
crosses the river and upon a high bluff,
on the south side of which runs a little
brook. There were several stones,
some of brown stone and at least
one of blue stone. All were broken
not one standing. On one stone was
the name of Joseph Riggs, died 1791,
on another Mrs. Joseph Riggs, and
on another the name of Johnson.
From the burying which contained
about twenty graves many of which
were unmarked. We went up onto
the flats on the West side of the river
between Beacon Falls and Pines Bridge
and searched for Indian flint. Mr.
Wright found one fine arrow point
made of dark flint, but I found nothing
but quartz chips and other signs of
Indian occupation. We then drove
back to Pines then West to the edge
of Oxford and up on Riggs street to a
point on the highland where we turned
to the right and crosseed over a rough
mountain South of Andrews moun-
tain and came out at the south
end of Naugatuck village. We then came
home which we reached at about 7:30
o'clock. J. G. Davenport preached at Mill Plain.

05\27\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps met for
practice this evening. There were present
Clifford Heaton, Roy Birch, David Waugh,
Harry Buckinham, and Clyde Miller,
Fiffers, George Cass, Irving Miller,
and myself, Snare Drummers, and George
Somers Bass Drummer.

05\28\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps had a
special meeting to night to prepare
to turn out Decoration day.
There were present Clifford Heaton,
Clyde Miller, and Harry Buckinham,
Fiffers. Chas. Hotchkiss, George Atkinson,
Irving Miller, George Cass, and myself
Snare Drummers.

05\29\{1901} Wednesday
Today {{Forepaugh's??}} Circus is in
town and the Factory did not run,
so Irving and I papered the front
hall and stairway which took all day.

05\30\{1901} Thursday
This is Decoration day and the
Mattatuck Drum Corps assembled
at Grand Army Hall at 10 o'clock.
At 10:30 the parade formed in front
of the hall as follows, a firing
squad of Co. A. C. N. G., the veterans
of the civil war about 50 in number,
the sons of veterans, and a few
veterans of the late Spanish war.
We marched to the Soldier's mon-
ument where prayer was offered
by the Chaplain of the sons of vetera-
ns after which there was singing
by a quartette of Highschool boys
after which Rev. Dr. Davenport read
Lincoln's address at Gettysburgh
after which Rev. Mr. Grauger delivered
an address after which there was
more singing then the Drum band
played a durge, after which the firing
squad fired three volleys and then
we marched away to the first church
where the veterans were photographed.
We then went to the hall where dinner
was served. At 1:30 o'clock we marched to
Polis theater where Rev. Dr. Parry delivered
an illustrated lecture on the civil war
which was very instructive.
This forenoon delegations of the Wadhams
Post G. A. B. visited the several cemetaries
in the town and placed flowers and flags
on the graves of dead soldiers, and at
four in the afternoon the Warman's
relief corps and the sons of veterans
decorated the urn in the Riverside
Cemetary which was erected to the unknown
dead.
The members of the Mattatuck Drum
Corps that turned out were: Fred
Peltier (Drum Major), Chas. Cass,
Dave Waugh, Clif Heaton, Clyde Miller,
Roy Birch, and Harry Buckingham (fiffers),
myself, (Bass Drummer) Gardener Hall,
George Cass, Charles Hochkiss,
Irving Miller, and George Atkinson
(snare drummers).

05\31\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\01\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\02\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Parry preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel to day.

06\03\{1901} Monday
Worked at factory to day.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met
for practice this evening.
Mr. Baldwin of the Wolcott Road
came to hear us drum.

06\04\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.

06\05\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
After work F. Pierpont and I went
up to William Blewett's and bought
two dozen tomatoe plants for which
I paid 50 cts.

06\06\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\07\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\08\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\09\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bentham preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.
A meeting of the Chapel committee was
held this afternoon and I was appointed
chairman for one year.

06\10\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\11\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Clyde, Pierpont, Irving,
Margaret, and Ruth, and myself went
to the Chapel and put the crash over
the carpet and got things ready for
the festival tomorrow night.
I heard to day that the charter for the
Cheshire trolley road which has passed
the legislator provides that the road
shall run on or near the old Cheshire
road. This will bring it by my house.

06\12\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening the Ladies gave a straw-
berry festival at the Mill Plain Chapel
this evening which was well attended.
John Lines orchestra furnished music.

06\13\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mr. Wright, Irving and
I went up to Wilson Pierpont's,
Springfield meadow to look after
Indian arrow points. We found many
chips, but only found one quartz bird
arrow point.

06\14\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\15\1901 Saturday
I worked at the factory to day.
This afternoon Irving, Clyde, Pierpont, and
I worked at my shop repairing the runway
that goes to the storeroom over the back
shed.
After supper I went to town to attend
the meeting of the committees of the
various school districts of the town to
arrange to pay the lawyers for opposing
consolidation, but the meeting had been
put off till July 1st and Mr. Ferrell
did not notify us.
Pete Laroque paid me 25.00 rent for my
shop.

06\16\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bassett preached at Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon. This evening
Mary and I drove out to John Tood's and
then up through Woodtick to William
Prichard's but they were not at home
so we went up accross Wolcott hill and
then home. The new flag pole that is
to be raised at Wolcott center lay there
on three or four horses and we looked
at it. I should think it is 75 feet long.
They are to have a public flag raising
July 4th.

06\17\1901 Monday
I worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum Corps
met at our place for practice.

06\18\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening the boys and I planted
in the garden seeds in the places where
the ones formerly did not come up.

06\19\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

0620\{1901} Thursday
Worked at factory.

06\21\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\22\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\23\{1901} Sunday
This morning Howard Wright and I went
to Wolcott to look after Indian relics but
we found none. We got home at noon and ate
dinner after which I went to the Chapel which
was crowded as it was children's day. Mr. Daven-
port officiated or talked to the children.
After the service there was a funeral from the
Chapel Mrs. Woodhill being the person
buried.
George Benham's three children were baptized
as was one by the name of George Gale.

06\24\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Clyde, Irving, Pierpont, and
I worked at John Reid's getting hay from
his story meadow on the East side of
the road at the top of the hill near the
old Coles Graniss place I took the meadow
to cut on shares.

06\25\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening the boys and I worked at the
hay at Reid's. Mr. Howard Wright came
and helped us.

06\26\{1901} Wednesday
Worked this day at Rogers & Brothers
factory. The weather has been very
hot.

06\27\{1901} Thursday
I worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been very hot.
This evening Irving and I in one team
and Clyde and Olive Able in another,
went to Wolcott center and attended
an entertainment given by the
Wolcott Flag association in a tent
on the green.
The programs consisted of first,
Drum Major exercise by Major Fred Peltier.
Second a Duet by Miss Upson and Miss
Haugh. Third Songs by two minstrels.
4th Clog dance by Hogan Brothers,
5th Dialogue by some young people
of Wolcott, which was well rendered.
6th Song and remarks by Luke
Henderson, who was dressed as a
nigger minstrel.
7th Mr. J. B. Clark Song.
8th Slight of hand tricks by Mr.
Sting and Mr. Merrill.
9th {{illegible word??}} Quartette of Co. A.
2nd, Regt. C. N. G. sang several
slections, one of which was, "My
old Kentucky home."
10th Recitation by Mrs. J. R. S. Todd,
entitled "Our Flag".
10th William Gillette and Mr. Davis
who impersonated {personited} two old Rubins.
12th
Story by David B. Wilson.
The next as the drawing of
a parlor lamp, which each that paid
an entrance fee had a check that
entitled him to a chance.
No. 323 drew it and it was held by
a boy named Herbert A. Snow, who
lives in Woodtick.

06\28\1901 Friday
I worked this day at the factory, and
it has been very hot. The thermometer
stood at 100 degrees above zero in some of
the rooms.
This evening I attended the annual
School meeting at Saw Mill Plains
School house.
Meeting was called to order by the
Clerk Mr. Hoggett at 8:20 o'clock.
Mr. Theodore I. Munson was elected
chairman, minutes of the last
meetings were read and and accepted.
Report of the committee Warren B.
Hitchcock was read and accepted.
Treasurer Martin Pond reported
the district to be 2,050 dollars in dept
and $107.00 on hand.
Tax Collector James Strovelle's report
was accepted.
Next was the election of Officers for
the coming year, and Warren
Hitchcock was elected, Committee.
B. F. Hoggett, Clerk.
Martin Pond, Treasurer.
James Strovelle, Tax Collector.
It was then voted to lay a tax of 10
mills on the dollar on the list of 1901.
Voted to elect two additional committee
men, and William Atkinson and
Theodore Munson were elected.

06\29\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been hot.
This evening we got up two loads of
hay from Thomas Mills and then
I went to Oakville on the new trolley
road to see Mr. Fletcher about preaching
at the Chapel tomorrow. I did not see
him as he had gone to Bridgeport.

06\30\{1901} Sunday
This morning I went to Oakville
and saw Mr. Fletcher and he said
he would come to Mill Plain and
preach this afternoon, which he did
after I carried him to the trolley
car. I drove home and did not go
away again as it was too hot.

07\01\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. The weather is very hot. The
thermometer stands 100 in the shade.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps met for practice and made
arrangements to go to Wolcott July
4th to attend the flag raising.

07\02\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day till
4 o'clock when we shut down on
account of the heat. The thermometer
registered 103 in many of the
rooms.
Cousin Ann Frisbie who lives in
Woodtick had a slight shock yesterday
and it is reported that she is quite
sick to day.
We had a thunder shower this
evening that cooled off the air
some.

07\03\1901 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day. The
weather has been very comfortable.
Barney Burns and Mary Ann Cummings
of Niagra Street were married at the Church
of the Sacred Heart this morning.
A house on Hickory Street (Abrigador) was
struck by lightning last evening.
Edward Byers who lives on the Southnayd
road had a son born Sunday.

07\04\1901 Thursday
There has been the least noise this day
of any 4th of July I can recall. At sun
rise I heard no heavy cannon as Church
bells as has been the custom of former
years.
At 9 o'clock Wm. Gaithwait came to my house
with a four horse wagon to take the members
of the Mattatuck Drum Corps to Wolcott to
attend the Flag raising. About 12 of the boys
went. We were met this side of Wolcott
center by William French who gave us each
a drink of sweet cider. We then reloaded
our drums at the town hall, and then took
a hand at raising the flag pole, which now
stands in front of the Church on the green
and is 68 feet in height. The large Wolcott
tent was next raised, and several times
we were called on to drum and fife. We
were soon joined by several members of
the old Wolcott Drum Band which I joined
in 1876, when Mr. Levi Atkins was leader.
The Wolcott Drum Band was organized in
1766 at the time of organizing the first
military company in Farmingbury parish
of which Aaron Harrison was Captain,
Herman Hall, Lieutenant, and Josiah Rogers
Ensign. The exercises began at 2 o'clock by
raising the flag. Mr. Henry Minor who
is 91 years old, and who has helped raise
4 other liberty poles on Wolcott green, pulled
up the flag, after which the drum band
played the "Three Cheers" at which the cannon
was fired and the Church bell rang and
the band played {plaid} "Rally around the flag",
after which the school children sang while
they stood about the foot of the pole.
All then went to the big tent where we
listened to a speech by Mr. Waters, the
minister, and also a speech by Mr. John
Saxe of Waterbury. The band had a fine
dinner in the tent, and then after playing
several pieces we came home.

07\05\{1901} Friday
This morning Clyde did not feel well
and I stayed home from the shop and
we went down to Father's to mow. Before
noon Clyde came and we, Clyde, Irving,
and I cut all of his grass, but it rained
this afternoon and we got in but little
after which we came home and I worked at
odd jobs of repair work.

07\06\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The shop shut down for the 4th, 5th, and
6th, but I had work repairing.

07\07\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon, after
Chapel Margeret and I went to Wolcott
to see Arthur Harrison and we got caught
in a shower at Mr. Norton's at the foot
of the hill so we went into his barn
and staid till it was over.

07\08\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The making, trimming, polishing, and
muffle room started up this morning.

07\09\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Jane Porter told me that he had a thermom-
eter that he bought 55 years ago for .75 cts,
and when he built his house in 1848 he
hung it in the North west corner where
the L part joins on, and it has hung there
ever since. He has been in the habit of
watching it in hot weather and has never
seen it above 100 degrees till Tuesday,
one week ago to day when it was 104
and he thinks it the hottest day ever
known since he can remember. He was
born in 1818.

07\10\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\11\1901 Thursday
I worked at the factory to day until
5:30 o'clock.

07\12\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\13\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening we drew a load of hay
from Tom Mills' lot and put it on the
stack.

07\14\{1901} Sunday
I worked at the factory seven and one half
hours to day, and am very tired as it
has been very hot. We had to line up a
shaft for a large drop which we could
not do when the power is running.
Howard Wright came to see me this
morning and ate breakfast with us.
We intended to take a ride which
I would have enjoyed very much.
I did not attend the service at the
Chapel as I wished to do. They had
an Episcopal service which was con-
ducted by the Rev. Mr. Pooley of
Oakville who is assistant to Rev. Mr.
Cunningham of Watertown.
I got through work at 4:30 o'clock and have
spent the rest of the day in sitting down
and reading.

07\15\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day for the mast
part repairing the hydraulic press but we
could not get it to force over two hundred
and fifty tons owing to a leek in the plunger.
It had ought to force 600 tons. We cut a
new packing and now have it in the press
and will try it tomorrow.
We finished haying at Mills lots to
day. The boys mowed about one and
one half acres this forenoon and we
drew it up in two loads tonight.
After supper Clyde and Irving went
horse back up to Atkinson's dead-
meadow in swimming.
The weather to day has been very
hot.

07\16\1901 Tuesday
This has been a very hot day.
I worked at the factory as usual. The first
thing this morning I oiled the shafting
and saw that all the belts, barings,
and etc. were all right. I found in William
Kennedy's room that the main loose
pulley had set fast on the shaft, after
"oiling up". Laurence Tobin and I put new
packing into the hydraulic press, but it
still leaked between a ring of the piston
so there will have to be a new ring
made. Then John Templeton and I got
the pulley loose in William Kennedy's
room so they could work there all right.
Then, after dinner, we cuppled the shaft
in the buffing room so they could work
there, and after that we got in two guides
for a new heavy drop and set one of
them up. I have done many other odd
jobs, all together making a busy day
and as it was very warm, so much so
that it was hard to breathe over head
in the shop where we worked some of
the time and my clothes were sweat
through. After work I came home and
worked on a little two-wheeled cart for Pierpont
and after supper we took two old cats over into
Elliott Doolittle's lot and shot them, after which
Clyde shot at Walter Mill's hat which was
set on a stick about six rods away. He did
not hit the hat but the gun hit him a knock
in the shoulder which made him stagger
back a few steps. The gun is an old musket
which was formerly a flint lock and made
in 1811 and was used in the War of 1812. My
grandfather Miller had it for a training
musket and he gave it to me.

07\17\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I wrote a letter to Mr. J.
R. Orr of New Haven who has lately
bought the Oak Tree house in Southbury.

07\18\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I attended the
Grange meeting.
Mr. William Atkinson approached me
in regard to joining a court of the order of
America which is to be organized in
Mill Plain.

07\19\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The weather has been very hot and
dry.

07\20\{1901} Saturday
Went to work at 4:30 o'clock this
morning and repaired a 10" belt
that drives a pair of spoon rolls that
broke yesterday afternoon. It took till
six when I came home and got my breakfast
and returned to work at eight. When I got back
there was a lot of work waiting for me.
Clyde is going to Buffalo next Monday
to the pan-American exposition and he
went this evening and bought his ticket
at the Rail Road depot for which he paid
$12.00.

07\21\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Pruner of Simonville
preached at Mill Plain Chapel.
The weather has been very hot and dry.
This morning as it was very hot I put
the saddle on the horse and rode out the
Cheshire road to the lot beyond the Goodyear
place and there turned in and went through
the lots to the old Holt place on bound live
highway, and then followed the old highway
North to the Cheshire road thence east of
Cheshire road to the old Backbone road
up the backbone road to the road that
goes to Ed Todd's brick house, down Todd's
road nearly to the house where I turned
North and went through the woods to
the Meriden road and then in Meriden
road and back home.
Martin Pierpont, who is going to Buffalo
tomorrow with Clyde, came tonight and
is staying with him.

07\22\{1901} Monday
This is thought by many to be the
hottest day so far this year. There are
many deaths reported in the papers to
night caused by the heat. The city
thermometer registered 97 degrees in the
shade but many others went up to 104.
This morning we got up at about
four o'clock, and Clyde and Martin
Pierpont got ready and Irving took
them to the depot in the buggy at 5:30
to take the train for Buffalo to attend the
Pan American exposition. Jessie Pond
and her mother Mrs. Martin Pond also
left on the same train. They are going
to New York and there ferry over
to Jersey City where they take the
Lehigh valley train which takes
them to Buffalo without change
of cars.
The meeting to organize a Court of Foresters in
Mill Plain was held in the School house this
evening. It was called to order by B. F. Hoggett
and Mr. Twiss was elected chairman. B. F. Hoggett
was elected Sec. Mr. J. J. McDonald was
introduced and remarked about the "Order
of Foresters". Next, Mr. Carney of Waterville
spoke on the same subject as did Mr.
George Husker, Wm. {{Kleuche??}}, Mr. Green Davis,
and Alex Haxton. It was then voted that
the chairman appoint an organization committee
of five, and he appointed William Atkinson,
Theodore Munson, Warren Hitchcock, Benjamin
Hoggett, and Oscar Fairchild committee. It was
also voted to call the Mill Plain Court, "Court
D. B. Hamilton." Twenty men signed application
papers and will have to go to Waterville to
be obligated, among them was myself.

07\23\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory till three o'clock a little
before three as Laurence Tobin, John Templeton,
and I were taking off a {{cuplin??}} box from a
2 1/2 " shaft. As I was on one side turning the
screw and they were on the other side with a brass
punch and sledge a piece of brass flew from
the punch and struck me in the head and
cut a hole in my forehead about one inch
long. I worked a little while longer and then
came home, as the sweat and spider webs
that we put on to stop the blood smarted.
We had a postal from Clyde which stated
that they were stranded in jersey City as
they missed the ferry and no train was going
west till evening; that their tickets would be
good and would have to wait 9 hours.

07\24\1901
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
No news from Clyde to day.
James Farrell died this morning at
the soldiers' home in Norotan Heights,
aged 69 years and 8 months. He was son
of Benjamin Farrell and was born on
the plank road where Mr. Batchelor now
lives.

07\25\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I attended
the Grange. The Grange voted to let
the new order of Foresters, which is to
be organized in Mill Plain, rent the
upper hall for 75.00 per year.

07\26\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Morris Alcott, Mr. Judd,
and I went to Waterville and were ex-
amined by Doctor Ryder who passed es
as candidates to become members of the
order of Foresters.

07\27\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
After work Irving, Pierpont, and I set two
tires on the wheels of my best buggy.
While we were eating supper, about 8 o'clock,
Clyde and Mart Pierpont came in, having
just returned from the Pan American
Buffalo and Niagra Falls. They left Buffalo
at 4 o'clock this morning and came by way of
Mohawk valley and Hudson River to New
York City andthen home.
They intended to stay till Monday but
Mart was taken sick so they came to day.

07\28\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Parry preached at Mill Plain Chapel.
I did not attend. Pierpont and I took the team
and went over to West side hill and saw Mr.
Benham. We then went to the old oronoke
school house, then turned South and went to
the Meloneleck hill road and over Town flat
and through Brooklyn and home.

07\29\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

07\30\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\31\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

08\01\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
The Mill Plain Chapel Sunday school had their
annual picnic to day at Compounce
lake. Mary and the Children went
and they report a good time. They rode
over in three buses to the number of about
60 and many others went by private teams.

08\02\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory.

08\03\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day one and one
half hours overtime.
To day Mary and the children went
out to Theodore Munson's cottage at
Hitchcock's pond and spent the day.

08\04\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Hollister preached at the Mill
Plain Union Chapel to day.
The notice that action on the resignation
of the episcopal committee would take
place next Friday evening at 8 o'clock was
read.
After supper Mary and I went over to
west side hill and I went to Mr. Benham's
and she stopped at her sister's where I
called later and spent the evening.

08\05\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mr. Loevelette Upson died this forenoon
at about 10 o'clock of dysentery.

08\06\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day ten
hours as usual.
This evening at 8 o'clock I attended a
town meeting held in the City hall.
After reading of the warning I
nominated John O'Neal chairman
and he was elected. They then voted
to appropriate $900.00 state money
for the repair of special section if
highways in the town, also voted
to build a new bridge across the Mad
River at the Rutter place or between
Munson's corner and the Chapel at
Saw Mill Plain.

08\07\{1901} Wednesday
Worked this forenoon in the factory.
It rained hard this forenoon but cleared
away at 11 o'clock.
I came home at noon and Mary and
I went out to Levelette Upson's funeral.
We got there at five minutes to two as
we supposed the funeral was to be at
two but it was held at one, but we
heard the last of Dr. Davenport's prayer.
There was a good number of friends and
neighbors present. He was taken to Woodtick
and buried. In the funeral procession were
first the minister with Mr. Twiss in a
single carriage, next the carriage with
the pall bearersm who were Embert Wright,
Adelbert Hitchcock, John Todd, and
Edward Todd. Next came the hearse, then
about four double carriages and then
came six or eight single teams. After the
service at the grave, I came home by the
Woodtick road and left George Alexander
who rode to the burying ground with
me at the Meriden road. Mary started
home afoot, but George Hitchcock overtook
her and gave her a ride to his house when Mr.
Judd came along and gave her a ride home.
When I got home I found Clyde getting ready
to go to Ida Spender's wedding which was to
be held in the Mill Plain Chapel at five o'clock.
So we all went and saw Ida married to
Frank Debissop, by Rev. Mr. Davenport.
The Chapel was prettily trimmed with ferns
and flowers. The ushers were Clarence and
Arthur Worden, Clifford Heaton, and Clyde
and Sidney Spender and Mary DeBissop
stood up with the bride and groom.
We then came home and ate supper of bread
and milk, after which we worked in the garden
a while after which I dressed Raymon's foot
that he cut with an ax last Friday.

08\08\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange.

08\09\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Mary and the children and Miss Picket
went up to Mr. Garrigus's place in Wolcott
and picked bill berries.
This evening Mary, Clyde, and I went
to the Chapel to a meeting to elect
a committee to fill the vacancy caused
by the resignation of Morris Alcott
from the Episcopal Committee.

08\10\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day till 4:30 when
I came home and set a tire in the spindle
buggy.

08\11\1901 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Lewis preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel this P. M.
This evening Mary and I went over to
West side hill. She stopped at her brother
Elmer's and I went to see Mr. Benham
and we talked over the tuition matter.

08\12\{1901} Monday
Worked as usual to day.
This evening Clyde, Mary, and I attended
a meeting of the Mill Plain Union
Chapel society and elected Chas. Mashier
episcopal committee in the place of
Morris Alcott who resigned.

08\13\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. This evening nineteen of
the men of Mill Plain went to
Waterville and were initiated into
the Order of Foresters of America.

08\14\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Agnes Able commenced working at the
New England Watch factory.
Mark Pond started this morning for
Buffalo to attend the exposition.

08\15\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I attended the Grange.

08\16\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory till 9 o'clock to night.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps had a meeting to
night to take action in regard to turning
out for a drummers convention that
is to be held in Waterbury the 24th of this
month.

08\17\1901 Saturday
Worked till 5:30 this evening. We have
had heavy showers this afternoon and
tonight.

08\18\{1901} Sunday
The weather has been very nice to day.
This afternoon the children of Mother
Pierpont met at her home at East Farms.
There were present: Charles J. Pierpont and
wife, Austin B. Pierpont and wife, Nellie
Pierpont Connor and husband George,
Wilson L. Pierpont and wife, Elmer
Pierpont and wife, and Mary Pierpont
Miller and husband who is myself.
We all sat on the rocks under the butternut
trees back of the house and had our picture
taken.
Rev. Mr. Moffett of the Waterville methodist
church preached at the Mill Plain Union
Chapel.

08\19\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps had a
meeting this evening and decided
to turn out next Saturday to the
drummers' convention to be given
in this City.

08\20\{1901} Tuesday
Worked to day at factory.
The weather has been very warm.
This evening Mr. Eugene Benham of
West side hill and I went to see C. S. Chap-
man, corner of North Willow and Rosiland
avenue aboue the vote raising the tuition
for children in the highschool from 30.00
to 60.00 per year. He said that he thought
it was intended to mean only scholars
from other towns, and not those who
reside in Waterbury outside the City.
We then went to see Mr. Tinker, superinten-
dent of schools, and he said that it cost
60.00 to educate scholars in the Highschool
and that it meant all scholars outside
the present City. We showed him the
charter and he was puzzled at first, but\
thought that the board could only
charge 30.00 according to that.

{08\21\1901 Wednesday [no entry]}

{08\22\1901 Thursday [no entry]}

{08\23\1901 Friday [no entry]}

{08\24\1901 Saturday [no entry]}

08\25\1901 Sunday
I have neglected to enter any events
in this journal since last tuesday night.
Wednesday Aug 21st I worked at the
factory as usual. Wednesday evening
I went to the Grange hall where the
Court of Foresters named Court D.
B. Hamilton was instituted, by state
Grand Chief Randil of Rockville and
State Grand Treasurer Dickinson of
Meriden, assisted by the officers of
Court Walsh of Waterville. There were
40 members at the organization. After
the exercises a supper was served
in the lower hall which made it very
late when I got home as I turned
from the Cheshire road onto the
Doolittle road near my house. I
nearly ran into another team which
I noticed was a canopy top buggy.
I unhitched the horse and went
into the house at quarter to one.
Thursday Aug 22. Worked at the factory as usual.
When Pierpot brought my dinner to day at
the shop he told me that Father had 45 chickens
stolen from his coop last night. I told it to
Morris Alcott and he said that he met
James O'Bryan last night in his canopy
top wagon near Mr. Travers' on the Stilson
road, a little time before I met the canopy
top wagon. This led me to think that the
O'Briens might have stolen the chickens.
When I went home I saw Will Gillette at
Father's and told him that it was the O'Briens
that stole the chickens I thought, so then we
agreed on a plan of action which we carried
out and was as follows. I went to the
Grange and remained there till 9:30 o'clock
when I left and mounted my horse and
went up the Woodtick road and
across over lovers lane to Mark Warner's
where I left my horse under a shed and
then called at the house where I saw George.
I asked him where his father was and he told
me that he was down the road, and we went
and found him and Morris Alcott down near
the Levinas Warner place where the O'Briens lived.
I left them and went and hid back of a stone
wall cast of the house across the road.
In the mean time Will Gillette had driven
to Simonville and got brother Frank and
drove to Mark Warner's and they stationed
themselves where they could watch. At twenty
minutes past eleven the O'Briens came out
and hitched up their team and started up the
Buckhill road. I ran as fast as I could and
got my horse and Will Gillette gave two
sandwiches which I put into my packet and
then I started after the O'Briens. The night
was dark as pitch. I drove past Lakewood
and up the main Buckhill road to where the
road that goes to Waterville turns off where I
dismounted and lit some matches and saw
that the tracks turned towards Waterville. I then
followed on, stopping at times to listen for some
times I heard the team. When I was going down the
hill into Waterville I passed them at a place where
they had driven out on the side of the road and
stopped. I left on down the hill and round the
corner till I was out of sight, when I started fast
as the horse could run to the Buckhill road
which I turned up and waited till I saw them
go down the street and turn towards the
rail road. I could not follow as they would
see me, for the electric lights were very bright.
When they were out of sight I started and followed
them under the rail road after which they
turned south, then west, and then south onto
main street where I could follow the tracks
no farther as the road was so hard.
I then went up to the center and tried to find
an officer, but he had just left on an electric
car for Waterbury. I then drove back to the
Warner place where I left my horse and reported
to the boys what I knew and then took my
place back of the wall where I had been before
I lay there a long time in the rain till about
half past three o'clock when Frank and Will
joined me and we all waited till five
minutes past four when the O'Briens came
down the Bucks hill road and stopped at the
corner of the Wolcott road and sat there in the
wagon a little while and then drove into the
barn yard and up to the wood house and
unhitched the horse and one of them led him
to the barn while the other worked about the
wagon unloading chickens I judged as we
could hear them. They then drew the wagon
to the barn and lit a lantern and cared
for the house, after which they went to the
wood shed and picked up two or three bogs
of chicken and carried them into the wood
house or around the South end, and soon after
went into the house.
We then went back to the shed where we left
the horse and started across the lots to the
Bucks hill road and then went to Waterville
to find where they stole the chickens. We did
not find out. But we found that the following
persons had had chickens stolen, and it has been
since proved that they were taken by the James and
Joseph O'Brien. Mr. Greatsinger of Waterville
had 83 stolen. Mr. Lorenson had 64. David
Sprague had 10. Mr. Johnson, 14, and a man
who lives on the upper Waterville road had 6 stolen.
Mr. Noble of Wolcott had 32 stolen. Mr. Garthwaits,
14. Mr. Kilbourne, 26. Mr. Baldwin, 24. Mr. Mc Carthy,
6. Mr. Mc Kniff, 12. Mr. Marrow, 46. Mr. Frey, 30.
and Father, 45, total 410. There are probably
others that we have not heard of.
After canvassing Waterville Will and I drove to
Father's, leaving Frank in the center where he ate
breakfast at about 8 o'clock, after which I came
home and lay down till noon when I went to
work in the shop. Will went and saw prosecuting
attorney Durant and then with detective
Cabay went to the Warner place and arrested
the O'Briens. Father went there in the
afternoon and identified a lot of his hens but
could not catch but 8 of them. The prisoners
were locked up but in the afternoon James
was released on $300.00 bonds and he imme-
diately left town, saying that he was going
to South Africa. Mother, Morris Alcott,
Mr. Fray, and I were summonsed to court
at 9 o'clock Saturday morning.
Saturday, Aug. 24, I went to the shop at
5:30 and oiled up. Then came home and
went to City hall to the trial of the
O'Briens. James had fled the town but
Joseph was there and stood trial but was bound
over to the superior Court under bonds of
$500.00. I then went and saw Perry Morris
at his livery stable on Spring street. I also
saw Dr. Davenport and he told me that he would
be at the Chapel to day.
I then came home, ate dinner, and put on
my drum corpd uniform and taking a
number of drums went back to town
and met my Corps at Cherry Street and
marched to the North side of the green where
there were assembled about a dozen corps.
The occasion being a convention of the drummers
and fifers of this part of the state, we started
on a march down Bank street to Brooklyn
and across to South main Street and back
to the center where we went into the City
hall as it was raining very hard, and had
been for nearly half of the march.
As soon as the Corps got into the hall I came
home as I was completely played out and
could do no more.
To day Sunday Rev. Dr. Davenport preached
at the Mill Plain Chapel. There was a large
attendance.

08\26\{1901} Monday
This morning I went to the Police court
and the bond of three hundred dollars
for the ofference of Mr. O'Brien was
called and settled so I came home
and went to work at the factory at
noon and worked till 9 o'clock to night,
as the shop ran till that time.

08\27\1901 Tuesday
Worked 13 1/2 hours at the factory to day.
Clyde and Irving finished painting the
sharehouse at my Carriage shop to day
the first coat.

{08\28\1901 Wednesday [no entry]}

08\29\{1901} Thursday
Am tired and sleepy to night.
Yesterday I worked as usual and last
night I watched at the factory as Mr.
Bloomfield the regular watchman was sick
with the malaria. To day I have not slept
any as it was hot and the flies bit.

08\30\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory till 9 o'clock
this evening. Received my last week's pay
this P. M. $10.80 was out 1 1/2 days.

08\31\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Samuel Ovaitt [Oviatt] and Cousin Marion, his
wife of Goshen, came to our house this
afternoon visiting.
This evening Mr. Eugene Benham called
to see me about tuition matters. We met
at Porter Woods law office this evening and
agreed to attend the meeting of the City
board of education to be held in the City
hall next monday evening at eight o'clock.

09\01\{1901} Sunday
Sam Ovaitt [Oviatt] and Marion staid with me
all day. This afternoon we went out to
the top of Southington mountain and looked
at the peach orchards. Clyde, Marion, Sam,
and I went. We had father's horse as mine
is lame.

09\02\1901 Monday
This is labor day, and is a legal holiday.
There has been a parade of the "Trades unions"
about the center this noon, and picnics at
the driving park on the Watertown road
and at Forest park on the Bucks hill road.
I went this morning and saw Charles
S. Chapman in regard to the tuition
matter, and called at Judge Cowell's office
but he was not in town. This evening
I went to the center and met Eugene
Benham and Porter L. Wood and we
went to the high school to attend a meeting
of the City board of Education, but they
did not meet as there was not a quorum
present.

09\03\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hourd to day.
This evening I went to the center and
there met Mr. Benham and Mr. Woods
and we went to the Highschool snd
attended the meeting of the Board of
education, and they voted to let the
tuition remain the same as it has
been for the people of the towns of
Waterbury in $30.00 per year but after
Jan. 1st, 1902, the non-residents of the
town of Waterbury will have to pay
$60.00 tuition for scholars who attend the
high school, and after Jan. 1st the new
charter provides that the first taxation
district must pay $30.00 tuition for
every scholar who attends the highschool.

09\04\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I attended a meeting
of Court D. B. Hamilton Foresters
of America.

09\05\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory till 9 o'clock
to night.

09\06\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory till 9 o'clock
to night.
This morning Clyde was taken
with severe pains in the back of
his neck which pained him to
move and he has been in bed nearly
all day.
President Mc Kinley was shot at
Buffalo, N. Y., to day while in the
temple of music at the pan-Amer-
ican exposition by a stranger
who fired two shots which took
effect in the abdomen.

09\07\{1901} Saturday
Worked to day at the factory.
The papers dtate that while the con-
dition of the president is critical,
that one of the bullets has been re-
moved and hopes are entertained for
his recovery.

09\08\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Lewis of St. John's Church
preached at Mill Plain Chapel this
afternoon.
The condition of the President is
said to be much better to day.

09\09\1901 Monday
Worked in the factory to day 13 1/2 hours.
The condition of the President is still
improving. It is thought that a plot was
laid by the Order of Anarchists to kill
him and the lot fell to Leon Czolasz
who committed the deed, and that he
would have been punished by death if
he had not done it.

09\10\{1901} Tuesday
Worked 10 hours at the factory.
This evening the boys and I went to the
Chapel and got it ready for the peach
festival tomorrow night.

09\11\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to West Side
Hill and saw Mr. Benham and
we together went to Porter L. Woods's office
in exchange place and saw him about
the Town meeting which has been peti-
tioned for. I then came to Mill
Plain and attended the peach
festival at the Chapel, but did not
stay very long. I walked home and went
to bed at 10:40.

09\12\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the Factory.
Miss Olive Able began working
at the spoon shop this morning in
the machine burnishing room.
This evening Mary and I attended
the Grange. Clyde joined to night
and took the first degree.

09\13\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
To night we blasted a big rock which
was in front of the house by the
road.
The condition of the President has changed
much for the worse, and the papers to-
night report him in a critical state.

09\14\1901 Saturday
President Mc Kinley died this
morning at 2:15 o'clock.
We were first notified of his death
by the toling of St. John's church bell
at about six o'clock, then came the
paper telling that death was caused
by gangrene settung un around the
bullets which Czolgosz shot into him.
It is now said that the bullets were
poisoned.

09\15\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bassett preached at Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.

09\16\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
I bought to day for Roland Jenner of
Rogers and Brothers 6 tea spoons, 1 butter
knife, and 1 sugar shell, for 2.50.

09\17\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at factory to day.
President Roosevelt has issued a procla-
mation to the effect that next Thursday
be observed by the Nation as President
Mc Kinley's funeral day.

09\18\{1901} Wednesday
I worked at the factory to day.
Mr. George Rockwell, Secretary of the
International combine, whose headquarters
are at Rogers Bros. factory, said today ,"that
nobody shall work in the factory tomorrow."
This evening I attended a meeting of the
democratic voters of the fifth ward, hwo
appointed a committee of nine to make up
a ward ticket. The meeting was held at
N0. 10 Grand Street (up stairs).

09\19\{1901} Thursday
This morning I got up at about six
o'clock and the boys and I drilled a hole
in a rock by the side of the road in front
of the South garden, and after breakfast
I blasted it.
This being the day that expresident.
Mc Kinley is to be
buried at Canton, Ohio. The children
went to school as usual where they remained
till ten o'clock, and all the schools had
memorial services appropriate to the day.
For myself, Mary and I went to St.
John's Church where union services of
all the protestant churches in the City
were held. There were so many that the
church could not hold them and they
had the Second Congregational church
opened and had service there also.
The service opened by a hymn by the
boy choir, then prayer by Rev. Mr. Davenport,
then, Hymn "Nearer my god to thee" by the
congregation. This was followed by an
address by Rev. Mr. Parry of the first
Baptist church, next song, then prayer
by Rev. Mr. Lewis of St. John's, then song
and an address by Rev. Dr. Anderson, and
service closed by the singing of "America" by
all.
After church was out Mary Margaret,
Ruth, and I took the trolley car at the
corner of the green and went to the
Waterbury Cattle show and Fair which
is being held at the driving park on the
Watertown road, nearly all the cattle were
taken away yesterday but Arthur Pierpont
had forty five head there and there were
a few more belonging to others. The poul-
try exhibit was large and there was a
great variety of fowls. The fruit and
vegetable exhibit was rather small but what
was there was very good. There was also
a great variety of needle-work, pies, cakes,
bread, etc., etc. There were a great num-
ber of fakers and catch penny shows.
For music they had the Waterbury
military band, and the Drummer boy
of the Rapponhannoe was there with
his son and they played several pieces
such as "Marching through Georgia"
and several Durges. At about 12:30
a carriage drove onto the ground bring-
ing Mayor Kilduff, Dr. Parry,
and Father Slocum. All business
was stopped and the Band played
"Nearer my god to thee," after which
Mayor Kilduff made a speech, after
which the Rev. William Slocum of the
Church
of the immaculate conception, deliver-
ed a very fine address. This was
followed by a prayer by Rev. Dr. Parry.
The exercises were held out of respect
to our dead President.
There were not many people at the
fair, but as Margaret and I were
coming down on the trolley we
met ten cars crowded with people
going to the fair, so that in the
afternoon there was a great crowd
there.
Margaret and I came to the City
hall which we reached at ten min-
utes past two, and we went in only
to find it crowded with people
who had come to attend the Memorial
Service in honor of President
William Mc Kinley.
The services opened at 2:30 with
music by the American Band which
played a portion of the twelfth Mass
Lead Stindly Light, Holy City,
and the Star Spangled Banner.
Next came an address by Mayor
E. G. Kilduff, then a prayer by
Rev. F. D. Brickley, then the singing
of the Hymn By the Audience,
"Nearer, My God to Thee."
Next an address by John O'neill.
Next Song by the Concordia Society,
then Address by Rev. Dr. Parry.
Next, Hymn, "Lead Kindly Light"
by a Quartette, then an address by
Rev. William J. Slocum, next Singing
of the Hymn, "America", by the audience.
This was followed by the Benediction
by Rev. Dr. J. G. Davenport.
We got out of the hall as soon as we
could and saw the Militia men, the
Veterans of the war of the Rebellion,
and the Sons of Veterans as they
came out and marched away.
At 3:30 o'clock the hour that President
Mc Kinley's funeral started from
the Church at Canton, Ohio. St. John's
Church bell began to toll, and
continued tolling about one half
hour. At the same time all the
trains in the United States no
matter where they were came to a
stand still and so remained for
five minutes, as did also the trolley
cars in Waterbury and I understand
they did in nearly or all the other Cities.
After the services in City Hall the
American Band gave a Memorial Concert
on the Green, which consisted of six
selections as follows, March, Sacred
Medley, Flower Song, Patriotic Selection
Hymns, "Lead, Kindly Light" and
"Nearer My God to Thee" and Sang
"Star Spangled Banner".
After this Margaret and I boarded an
East Main Street car where we were
joined by Mary and Ruth who had
just returned from the Driving park
and we came home.

09\20\{1901} Friday
I worked at the factory to day as usual.

09\21\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

09\22\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Davenport preached at Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.

09\23\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

09\24\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The trial of Leon Czolgosz began
yesterday at Buffalo, N.Y. He is
charged with murdering President
Mc Kinley.

09\25\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The jury found Czolgosz guilty
of murder in the first degree yerter-
day afternoon for the murder of
President Mc Kinley. He is to
receive his sentence tomorrow at
2 o'clock.

09\26\1901 {Thursday}
Worked at the factory to day.
The weather has been very nice all day.
My name appears to day on the ticket
of the Democratic party as a representative
to the convention to nominate the candidates
for the City school board.
They have closed the Meriden road
at Munson's corner which turns the
travel of that thoroughfare down past
our house. The road is closed be-
cause they are taking down the bridge
over the Mad River near Major Tucker's,
and are taking it to replace the wooden
bridges at the Mad River crossing
near B. F. Hoggett.

09\27\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
Czolgosz, the murderer of President
Mc Kinley, was sentenced to be
electrocuted to day, during the week
beginning Oct. 28th.

09\28\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.
At the primary election held yesterday
evening, the ticket that I was on was
defeated.

09\29\1901 Sunday
Rev. Dr. Anderson preached at Mill Plain
Chapel. As the bridge across the Mad
River on the Meriden road was down
and there was no way of crossing, the
attendance was small.

09\30\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory of Rogers & Bros.
to day.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum
Corps met at my place for practice.
Arthur Pierpont and his wife called
and he reckoned up his accounts with
Clyde in regard to their milk business.

10\01\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
I see by the papers to day that the
Republicans nominated Judge Cowell
for mayor and George Boughton and
William Atkinson for selectmen last
evening.

10\02\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Received my pay which amounted to
thirteen dollars and fifty cents for
last week's work.

10\03\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I attended
the Grange.

10\04\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This morining and evening Irving
and I worked drilling a deck hole in
the big rock which is in the water ditch
in the North West corner of my lot.

10\05\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day till five o'clock.
After I got home from the shop we fired
the blast in the big rock which blew it all
to pieces. We used over 1/2 pound of black
blasting powder and it moved every bit
of the stone.

10\06\{1901} Sunday
This morning Margaret, Ruth, Pierpont,
and I went over in the woods to the North
East and picked up a lot of chestnuts.
This afternoon we went to the Chapel and
heard Rev. Mr. Parry preach.
After we got home Mary and I went to
Sam Wilson's who lives near the Great
falls on the Mad River in Wolcott.
We got home at about nine o'clock and it
was very cold.

10\07\{1901} Monday
This morning I got up at 5:30 o'clock and
wrote several letters, after which we ate
breakfast of hash potatoesm etc. Then, Pierpont
carried me to Silver Street where I took
the trolley car to the center as this is
City election. I went immediately to
attorney Porter Woods's office, but found it
closed, but as I was coming away I met Mr.
Benham and we went to City Hall and saw
Town clerk Brett and asked him to draw up
a motion to present at the annual town
meeting providing that the tuition fee of
scholars living in the town of Waterbury and
attending the highschool in said town
shall be paid by the town of Waterbury.
Mr. Brett sent us to Town attorney Carmody
but we could not find him, so Mr. Benham
went in search of Mr. Wood and I went up
in the hall and drew up a motion in writing
as the time of calling the meeting had arrived,
but just then Mr. Benham and Mr. Woods
came with his motion and the meeting was
called to order by Town Clerk Brett who
read the warning, after which the Select men's
yearly report was accepted, then the tuition
motion was read by Mr. Woods and it was
carried by a unanimous vote, after which the
meeting ajourned to meet again at eight
o'clock this evening, and the crowd dispersed
to their several voting places. I went to
the building erected for voting purposes of Scoville
street and voted the straight Republican ticket for
City officers, George H. Cowell for mayor, etc.
I also voted against amending the constitution
of the State of Connecticut.
I then went to Hotchkiss and Templetons hard-
ware store and bought two pounds of blunt
toe calks for which I paid twelve cents. I then
went to Dexter's Drug store and bought twenty
five trolley car tickets for which I paid one
dollar. I then took the trolley car home and
then changed my clothes and went to the
shop which I reached at ten o'clock, and worked
till half past five. When I came home and after
working a spell had supper of sweet potatoes, meat,
etc. I have spent the evening in reading, writing, etc.
The Mattatuck drum Corps met for practice this
evening.

10\08\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.
The following were elected at yesterday's
election: Mayor Edward G. Kilduff, democrat;
City Clerk, Michael J. Ryan, democrat;
City Treasurer, George A. Gibson, democrat;
Comptroller, Michael D. Russel, dem.;
Sheriff, John W. Mc Donald, dem.;
Agents Bronson Library Fund; H. A.
Fuller, dem., and Earl A. Smith, republican.
Selectmen, Mortimer Doran, dem.;
William T. Disley, dem., and George A.
Boughton, republican. Board of Education:
Isadore Chase, dem., George W. Russell,
dem., Charles Y. Kent, dem.; Timothy J.
Carmady, dem.; Dr. E. W. Goodenough,
republican; Chas. S. Chapman, rep., and
Wilfred E. Griggs. Town Clerk, Frank
P. Brett, dem. Tax Collector, William E.
Thoms, dem. Board of Relief: John J. Siefn,
John F. Healey, and Edwin W. Biggerstaff, Rep.
Constables: Maurice F. Carmady, dem.;
Thomas H. Pryor, dem; Walter B. Lannen,
dem; Edward J. Donahue, dem; William
M. Gillette, rep. John Barrie, rep., and
George O. Booth, rep.
For Aldermen, the First, Second,
and Third Wards went Republican and
the Fourth and FIfth went Democratic.
The question of Constitutional amend-
ment was voted favorable.

10\09\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

10\10\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Mad River Grange.

10\11\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory.

10\12\{1901} Saturday
To day I have worked repairing the roof
of my blacksmith shop. I mean the shop
that I have leased to Mr. Laroque.
This evening Irving and I went to the
Chapel and repaired the walls of the
pit that the furnace is set in.

10\13\1901 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Pooley of Oakville preached at Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.
Frank came to see me this afternoon
and stayed till after Chapel commenced,
so I did not get there till after service was over.

10\14\1901 Monday
Worked at the factory to day till
9 o'clock.

10\15\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual, till 8:30 o'clock.
Mrs. Levelette Upson is to keep house
for Major Tucker.
John Mc Coy has moved to day from
the Cemetary house east of us to day
to a house on east main street.

10\16\{1901} Wednesday
Worked in the factory 10 hours to day.
The Wolcott Fair was held to day and
it is estimated that there were 9000 people
there.

10\17\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory till 8:30 o'clock
to night.

10\18\1901 Friday
Worked at the factory till 8:30 o'clock.

10\19\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day till 4:30 o'clock.
Irving and I shod Clyde's milk horse this
evening.

10\20\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Pruner preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.

10\21\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory 13 hours.

10\22\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory 13 hours.

10\23\1901 Wednesday
This morning I got up at four o'clock and
Irving and I went to the shop and we oiled
up the shafting after which we came home
and had breakfast and we got ready and
Mary and I started and rove with old
Nell to Cheshire depot where we put the
horse in a barn owned by a widow lady.
We then went to the depot to take the
train for New Haven to attend the cel-
ebration, this being the week of the Bi-
Centennial of Yale College, President
Roosevelt came to Farmington yesterday to
visit his sister, and we understood
that he was going to New Haven on the
regular train on which we were going,
but he came down on a special train
of two cars and an engine ten minutes
ahead of the regular. As the train passed
the Cheshire station the President came to
the rear door of the train and waved his
hand.
Our train was ten minutes late in reaching
New Haven, and on looking out of the car
windows we saw the Governor's Foor Guards
in their Grenadier red coats and bear skin
hats drawn up in line and ready to
march. We got out of the cars and hurried
fast as possible to get a glimpse of the
president but we could not reach the
column before it started. We hurried
across streets and around blocks to
reach the front of the parade but
the crowd was every where and twice
we were in time to see only the rear
end, i. e. the rough riders and artillery.
The buildings everywhere were trimmed
with blue bunting and yellow chinese lanterns.
While the president was going from the rail-
road station to the Colleges, cannons were
being fired from ships in the harbor and
all of the Church bells in the City were
ringing and many whistles were blowing
altogether the President received a very
patrioric reception.
At ten o'clock several companies of the
1st Regt. C. N. G., headed by Colts band of
Hartford, marched through Center street
and formed on the right side of Elm
Street at present arms. This was followed
by the 2nd Regiment, 10 companies which
lined up on Elm street, then the colored
batallion followed, and lined up on Center
street. Then came the Second Regiment
band followed by the Governor's Foot
Guards, the Gatlin Gun platoon, and
the mounted infantry which lined
up on Center Street.
The procession came from Yale College
and marched down Elm Street through
Center to the Phelph Gate of the College,
into the Campus and out through the
Vanderbilt gate and across Chapel
street to the Hyperion theater building.
The procession was headed by a squad of
Policemen, then came mounted marshalls
followed by a brass band, then Yale
College graduates, hundreds and thousands
of them, some coming from the ends
of the world to attend this bicentennial
of Yale College. Hundreds of the graduates
were clad in robes of various colors and
hats with square tops also which distinguished
their degree of learning. There were some
there that graduated in 1830. Among the
most noted graduates walked President
Roosevelt. He was clad in gray citizen's
clothes and President Hadley of Yale
marched by him, while in front marched
two detectives and six others followed.
My wife and I stood in front of Center
Church and I had a fine view of the President
as he posed. He is a nice looking man though
not so large as I expected to see.
Back of the graduates came the Yale students
but they could not get into the hall as
it was already full uf the graduates.
The title of L. L. D. was conferred upon the President
in the Hyperion by Professor Hadley, after which
he went to Proffesor Henry Farnum's house
on prospect hill and had dinner.
Mary and I waited in front of the Hyperion
to see the President come out after the
exercises were over, but he came out of the
rear entrance and was driven up on block
and over to Prospect hill, I heard the crowd
cheer up the street and saw the mounted police
and the President's carriage crossing the
horses were on a dead run.
Mary and I went through the Campus and
into the Chapel. We also went into University
hall which is not yet fully finished. We
then walked out to East Rock and went
up the Soldier's monument where we had
a fine view of the surrounding country
and the City and harbor although it was
a little hazy. We then walked to Whitney
avenue and took the trolley cars to Mount
Carmel (fare 20 cts). We got our team and
drove home, where I found Mr. Atkinson
and Mr. B. F. Hoggett waiting to see me
to find out about the boundaries of the
highway that passes their houses. I told
them that I would give them a copy of
the original layout.

10\24\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours.

10\25\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory ten hours. We did
not work to night as the Rogers Bros. benefit
association has a sociable in the City hall
this evening and the boys and girls all
want to go.

10\26\1901 Saturday
Worked to day at the factory.
This evening the boys and I drew stones
out of the swamp.

10\27\{1901} Sunday
I had to work in the factory putting
a large pulley on the main shaft to run some
new drops we are putting in.
Rev. Mr. Davenport preached at Mill Plain
Chapel.

10\28\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours to day.
This evening two boys, Glen Cornelus and
Elmer Coe of Wolcott, came to learn to drum.
This is the week that Czolgoz, the murderer
of President Mc Kinley, is to be electrocuted
and the time is set for him to be put to
death tomorrow morning at seven o'clock.

10\29\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory 13 hours to day.
Leon Colgosz, the murderer of President
Mc Kinley, was electrocuted at Auburn
Prison, N.Y., this morning at 7:11.

10\30\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory 10 hours to day.

10\31\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory 13 hours to day.

11\01\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory 13 hours.
Sent Post Office Order to John Wanamaker
of New York for $1.50, a payment on Red-
path's history of the World.

11\02\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory 9 hours but they
give ten hours pay.
Last night a delegation from the trim-
ming room went before Mr. Rockwell in
his office and complained of having
to work nights in the dust and of the
time of washing up being reduced, etc.
He told them that he would have
the best blower in the market put in
next January that would exhaust all
the dust out of the room, and that
they might have twenty five minutes
to cool their wheels and wash up in,
but he hoped they would continue to
get the work out as he was pushed with
orders if part of them worked two nights
and the other part two other nights.
This was agreed to.
Tonight after I got home I sharpened
a lot of stone drills, and Irving and I
made a hitching post out of a two
inch bar of round iron.

11\03\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel to day.
The Meriden turnpike is still closed to
travel. They have but one {{abutmnt??}}
partly built for the new bridge at
the Mad River crossing near Major
Tuckers.
This morning I rode out to Gillette
corners and saw John Mass about the
horse that Mr. Sinnette wishes to sell
me.

11\04\{1901} Monday
Worked at Rogers & Brothers spoon factory
13 hours.

11\05\{1901} Tuesday
Worked in the factory 13 hours.
This is election day in which the people
vote for representatives to the Constitutional
Convention to be held to amend the
constitution of the state of Connecticut.
Stephen W. Kellogg and Francis P. Guil-
foile were the candidates of Waterbury.
The former Republican and the latter dem-
ocrat. I did not go to vote.
This afternoon Irving went to Mr. Sinnette's
at Gillette's corners and got a large black
horse that I am thinking of buying.

11\06\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening the Ladies union of Mill
Plain Chapel society held a meeting
and elected officers for the coming year.
They also had a supper and entertainment.
The entertainment was given by members
of St. Paul's methodist church.

11\07\{1901} Thursday
Worked in the factory 13 hours.

11\08\{1901} Friday
Worked in the factory 13 hours.

11\09\{1901} Saturday
Worked in the factory 5 hours.

{11\10\1901 Sunday [no entry]}

11\11\1901 Monday
Rev. Mr. Lewis of St. John's Episcopal
Church preached at the Mill Plain Chapel
yesterday afternoon.
Saturday afternoon my wife and I
started with our team and drove to Mr.
Samuel Ovaitt's [Oviatt's] in Goshen center. We
left home at 1:30 and went by way of
the center of Waterbury to Watertown,
then to East Morris and through Litch-
field center to Goshen, which we reached
at about 7 o'clock.
He lives in the first house east of
the meeting house on the Torrington
road (on the south side of the road) The
family consists of Samuel Ovaitt [Oviatt],
his wife, who was Marion Gillette of
North Goshen, a cousin of mine, his
mother, and Miss Rosa Hubbard, who
has lived in the family for many
years and is about 40 years of age.
We stayed over night and the next forenoon
Marion, Mary, and I went to Church.
The edifice was about half-filled with
people. Probably there would have been
more there if the weather had not been
so cold and windy.
In the afternoon Mary and I went to the
Cemetary and spent about an hour looking
at the monuments, etc.
We then returned to Mr. Ovaitt's [Oviatt's] and had
supper, after which we went out to the
barn and did the chores. I milked three
of the cows out of his seventeen and Sam
and Marion milked the rest.
They then run the milk through a ma-
chine which separated the cream from
the milk. After the pigs, hens, horses, etc.,
had been cared for we went into the
house and Marion played on her organ
while she and I sang till bed time.
We got up early this morning and did
the chores after which we had breakfast
and then started for home. We came though
Goshen East Street, and over Chestnut hill
in Litchfield where we stopped for an hour
and a half and visited Mr. William Morse
and wife. We also stopped at the new Branch
dam which they are raising fifteen feet
higher. They had a large force of men at
work and four steam derricks in operation
along the top of the dam. We then came
through Renols bridge and Waterville home
which we reached at half past four.

11\12\1901 Tuesday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours.

11\13\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory 10 hours.
To day we had the first snow of the
season.

11\14\{1901} Thursday
Worked thirteen hours at the factory.
It snowed again to day so that it
lay on the ground to the depth of two
inches.
I paid James Sinnelt twenty five
dollars on the big black horse.

11\15\{1901} Friday
Worked thirteen hours in the shop.
Mr. Joseph Bloomfield died this morning
at quarter past seven. He has worked for
Rogers Bros. for the past 30 years and as
night watchman 25 years.

11\16\1901 Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

11\17\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Moffiatt preached at
Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.

11\18\{1901} Monday
Worked in the factory thirteen
hours.

11\19\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening I went to the tax collector's
office and saw Mr. Thoms about a bill
of 80 cts he sent me with liens and casts
which amounted in all to 2.48. He found
that it was a mistake on his part and
abated all but the 80 cts.

11\20\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening we went to the Chapel
to a supper and an entertainment which
was managed by Miss Fannie Porter.
They cleared $12.64.

11\21\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours.

11\22\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours.
I paid James Sinnett twenty five dollars to
day, a balance owed him on a horse.

11\23\{1901} Saturday
To day I worked ten hours.
After work we shod old Nell.

11\24\{1901} Sunday
This has been a very stormy day. This
morning the snow lay on the ground
about an inch thick and the wind blew
very hard, but it began to rain at 8 o'clock
and kept it up all day.
Rev. Mr. Holden preached at Mill Plain
Chapel.

11\25\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours to
day.
This evening Clyde, Pierpont, Irving,
and myself went out to Ed Pritchard's
place at Wedges and got an old mill-
stone that I bought of William Howd
several years ago.
Saturday noght there was a man by
the name of Bowe shot on the plank
road by an Italian who lives in the
Harper's Ferry house. Bowe and several
others tried to get into the Italians'
house and also threw stones at it.
When the Italians fired and the shot
struck Bowe in the stomach, he walked
to the center and from there was
carried home in a hack. He lived on
Silvian avenue. At 10:30 P.M. he expired.
The Italians are under arrest, charged
with murder.

11\26\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

11\27\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours

11\28\{1901} Thursday
Thanksgiving day
State of Connecticut
By His Excellency
George P. McLean, Governor,
A Proclamation.
In harmony with the sacred custom of the
fathers, and in grateful recognition of the
ever-present fulfilment of the promises of
God, I hereby appoint Thanksgiving the twenty-
eighth day of November, as a day of

Thanksgiving and Prayer,

and I recommend that the people of Connecticut,
as the children of one father, dedicate this day
to deeds of charity and brotherly love and in
their churches and homes render praise
and thanksiving to the God of Nations, for
the full measure of peace and plenty he has
given to our beloved commonwealth.

Given under my hand and seal of the State,
at the Capitol at Hartford, this fifteenth
day of November, on the year of our Lord,
one thousand nine hundred and one, and
the independence of the United States,
the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

George P. Mc Lean

By his Excellency's Command:
Charles G. R. Winal,
Secretary.

The Somers family met at the home of
Andrew W. Goldsmith on Clay St. There
were present 41 persons. They were: uncle
Dwight Somers and Wife and Joe and Eugene
Smith, uncle Joe and family of five; Uncle
Goldsmith and family of two; Father and
Cara, Iva, and Mother; George Somers and
WIfe; Robert Somers, Wife and child; William
Gillette, Charles Phillips and Wife; myself,
Wife, and six children; Frank Miller and
wife; Ben Chatfied, Frank Frisbie,
Rolland Jenner, Wife and two daughters,
and Amy Miller.

11\29\{1901} Friday
I worked at the factory ten hours.
The weather has been very cold.

11\30\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening I went out to Adelbert Hitch-
cock's in Wolcott to see if I could sell old
Nell.

12\01\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at Mill Plain
Chapel.

12\02\1901 Monday
Worked thirteen hours at Rogers & Brother's
factory.
Saturday evening at about quarter to six
as two brothers James and John Sinnett,
who live with their father on the Chatfield
place on the plank road at Gillett's corner,
were driving home from work the britchen
broke as they were descending the hill in
front of Robert Hotchkiss and the horse
broke into a run and became unmanage-
able and as they turned the corner by the
Wedge place the buggy tipped and they
were thrown out. John struck on his head
and was unconscious when James found
him. James also received a head wound
and his wrist was broken. He carried his
brother into Mr. Blackburn's house and
they sent for Dr. Donahue who ordered
James taken to the hospital where he
died at ten minutes past three this
morning.
The brothers worked at Rogers & Brothers.
James is a polisher and John a rooler.


{12\03\1901 Tuesday [no entry]}

{12\04\1901 Wednesday [no entry]}

{12\05\1901 Thursday [no entry]}

{12\06\1901 Friday [no entry]}

{12\07\1901 Saturday [no entry]}

12\08\1901 Sunday
I have been busy, tired, and indolent for
the past five days that I have failed to
keep a record each day.
Tuesday I worked 13 hours at the factory.
Wednesday I worked 10 hours. In the evening
the ladies' Union gave a supper and entertain-
ment at the Chapel. I had charge of the en-
tertainment, which was furnished by the
Driggs school Orchestra under the management
of Miss Niven, Principal; I furnished three of
the five teams that carried the entertainers
from the trolley cars to the Chapel, and also
paid their car fare, 1.12.
Thursday I worked at the factory thirteen hours.
Friday " " " " " fifteeen "
Saturday " " " " ' ten "
Today Mr. Bishop, a layman, preached at Mill
Plain Chapel.
The weather has been very cold some of the time
during the past week. Yesterday morning the
thermometer stood at seven below zero, but
to day the weather has been warmer so it
has thawed a little. The sleighing has been
good for the past three days.

12\09\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours to
day.
The weather has been warmer and it has
thawed quite a little.

12\10\{1901} Tuesday
Worked thirteen hours.

12\11\{1901} Wednesday
Worked ten hours.

12\12\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours.

12\13\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory thirteen hours.

12\14\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

12\15\{1901} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Pruner preached at Mill Plain Chapel.

12\16\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Clyde began peddling milk for Arthur
Merriman yesterday. Merriman has
bought out Arthur Pierpont's day
route.

12\17\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

12\18\{1901} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening the Ladies' union held a
supper and entertainment at the Mill
Plain Chapel. All of my family attended.
The price of supper was 15 cts each, and
the entertainment consisted of recitations,
music on violin and piano together
with singing, and a dialogue entitled
the district school.

12\19\1901 Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening I went to the Chapel and
helped tie greens for christmas.

12\20\{1901} Friday
Worked ten hours to day at the factory.
This evening I went to the chapel and helped
trim it for christmas.

12\21\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening I went to the Chapel and
helped trim it for Christmas.

12\22\{1901} Sunday
Had Christmas service at Chapel.
Rev. Dr. Davenport preached and the
Choir rendered several special selections.

12\23\{1901} Monday
Worked at Rogers Brothers factory ten
hours.
This morning at about 8 o'clock Clyde and
Irving were geting some christmas trees
for Rev. Dr. Davenport over on the ledge
by the Mad River and in order to get
such trees as they wanted they sowed the
tops off from some very high hemlock
trees. As Clyde was descending one of the
tall trees two of the branches that he
had hold of broke at the same time and
he fell a distance of twenty five feet to
the ground. He called and Irving went
to his assistance and helped him get
home. They hitched up soon as possible
and drove to Dr. Barber's office on North
Main Street and found that Clyde had
sprained his left wrist and broken his fore
finger on the right hand and cut and bruised
his head besides several other bruises about
the body.

12\24\1901 {Tuesday}
Worked at the factory ten hours to day.
This being Christmas eve the factory
closed at 5 o'clock.
I received my pay for last week's work
which amounted to 13.50.
Clyde has been in bed nearly all day.
His hand is badly swollen.

12\25\{1901} Wednesday
This is Christmas day. This morning
the children were up early and dressed
and then went down stairs and
opened their stockings and found them
full of presents. I foun in mine a watch
made by New England Watch Co.
of this City. On the wrapper was written
Papa from Clyde, Irving, Margaret,
Ruth, Pierpont, Raymond, and Mama.
This noon we went to Father's where
all of my brothers and sisters and
their wives were assembled, except Fred
and his wife who live in Detroit.
In the afternoon we had dinner, and
in the evening a christmas tree for
the Children, but there were some
presents for the grown up people. I received
a linen handkerchief from Clyde.

12\26\{1901} Thursday
Worked at the Chapel this evening
with Hiram, Able, and Agnes getting
ready for the Christmas entertainment
tomorrow evening.
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Rogers & Brothers factory finished 35,000
gross of spoons, knifes, forks, ladles, etc.,
this past yeat.

12\27\{1901} Friday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening the Mill Plain Chapel
held its Christmas celebration.
The Chapel was filled full of people,
both young and old.
The programs consisted of Recitations,
songs, dialogues, music, etc.
They also had a Christmas tree and a fire
place. A Santa Claus came in through the
fire place and gave presents to all the scholars
and teachers.

12\28\{1901} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
The spoon shop shut down to night for the
new year's vacation.

12\29\{1901} Sunday
Dr. Davenport preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon. The day has
been very stormy and the attendance
was small.

12\30\{1901} Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours repairing.

12\31\{1901} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Repairing the engine, Mr. Beniji
Lockwood of the Charles Engine Co.
of Providence, R. I., where the engine
was made thirty years ago, has charge
of the work and I am helping him.

1902

01\01\1902 Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours on
the engine.
This evening the Ladies Union gave
an oyster supper and entertainment
at the Chapel.

01\02\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange, and all of the young folks
went skating up on Frost's pond.

01\03\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory 10 hours.

01\04\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory 10 hours.
The highway and new bridge at the
crossing of the Mad River at the old
tannery pond on the Meriden Road is
now open to the public.
The weather is very cold to day.

01\05\1902 Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain Chapel
this afternoon.
Yesterday the papers contained an account of
the sinking of the steam ship Wala-Wala
off cape Menecino on the Pacific coast which
had been run into by a French bark.
Cousin Willie Goldsmith was supposed to
have been on board as this is the ship
that he sailed.
This morning a telegram came from the
ship Company that he was aboard. but
was among those that was saved.
The Walla Walla went down last Thursday.

01\06\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day piping and
also at other odd jobs.
This evening Irving, Pierpont and I went
to the Chapel and took down a portion of
the furnace pipe which is rusted out and
am going to send in to Barlow Brothers
to be repaired.
I then called on Charles Mashier and
talked over Chapel business.

01\07\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours this
day.
This evening the Foresters Fair opened
at the Grange hall.
I went up to Farm street to see Rev. Mr.
Bassett. I found him in the basement
of the church conducting a prayer meeting
which was well attended. After the meeting
was over I did my business with him
and drove home.

01\08\1902 Wednesday
Worked at the factory 10 hours to day.
James Gibbons, who works at the shop,
injured his foot by driving a pick ax
through it. I did it up and stopped the flow
of blood so that they could take him
down to the doctor.

01\09\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

01\10\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening the boys and I went to
the Chapel and took down the Christmas
green and tried to put up the new furnace
pipe but it would not go as it is too
small.
Cousin Willie Goldsmith telegraphe
from San Francisco that he was aboard
the Walla Walla but wass all O.K.
He sent the message last Sunday night.

01\11\1902 Saturday
Worked at the factory ten 1/2 hours.
The boys and I went to the chapel and
put up the furnace pipe and oiled the
clock and swept out the building.

01\12\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Waters of Wolcott preached at
the Chapel.
I worked at the factory this forenoon form
9 to 12 o'clock putting wooden cogs in a
big iron {{belvel??}} gear which we have got to
run tomorrow when we start up the shop.
This evening Margaret and I went up
to Woodtick and saw Mr. Gustave Cornelius.
Were gone from home one hour.

01\13\1902 Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
They started up the factory to day, all except
the trimming, plating, burnishing, buffing,
and packing rooms.

01\14\{1902} Tuesday
I went to work at six this morning as I had
to put the gear in that runs the trimming
room and they wanted to start it up. I
came home and ate breakfast after seven
o'clock. To day we put a large exhaust fan
in place in the trimming room whixh has
thegreatest capacity of any exhaust fan in
Waterbury. It is a 60" double fan, is to make
1300 revolutions per minute and weighs 1 and 1/2
tons.
Laurence Tobin and I went to the vacant
factory of Rogers and Hamilton and
took out a bolting box and a large
belt pulley off from the main shaft in
the making room, and we got their chain
tackles, all of which we brought to Rogers
& Brothers factory.

01\15\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
I had charge of the entertainment at the
Chapel to night.

01\16\{1902} Thursday
Worked as usual to day 10 hours.
This evening Mary and I attended the
grange. Mr. Rich of Meriden left a
type writer to day.

01\17\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory ten hours to
day.

01\18\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory 9 hours.

01\19\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bassett preaches at the Chapel
to day. Aside from going to Chapel
I stayed home all day and did some
copying on the typewriter which
is a Blickensderfer.

01\20\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I attended the first
meeting of the City board of ed-
ucation, and the Committees of
the outlying school districts. The object
of the meeting was to form some plan
by which the City board and the district
Committees can work together in harmony.
Secretary Charles D. Hine, of the State
board of education, was there and addressed
the meeting and also gave much useful
information.

01\21\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

01\22\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening Clyde and I lengthened
out a set of reach irons one foot for
Arthur Merriman for which I charge 1.00.
Raymond, F. Pierpont, Irving, and
Margaret all have the mumps.

01\23\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This noon we started up the new
exhaust fan in the trimming room.
It is a double 60 in. fan, of greater
capacity than any other in this
City and requires 38 horse power to drive
it.

01\24\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory today.

01\25\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
All odf my children except Ruth are confined
to the house with the mumps.

01\26\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Claskey conducted the
Episcopal service at the Mill Plain
Chapel. Mr Claskey is assistant to
Mr. Lewis of St. John's Church.
St. John's church was originally St.
James Church.

01\27\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours as
usual. This evening I filed a wood
saw for Milan Northrop and also
one for Ed Branson.
My five children who have the
mumps are a little better.
The weather is very warm and rainy.
Have had but little cold weather so far.

01\28\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.

01\29\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Pierpont, Raymond, and Margaret
have recovered from the mumps and
went to school to day.
We attended an entertainment
at the Chapel which was given by the
young Ladies.

01\30\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Mary ent to the Grange this
evening but I stayed home and did
some copying on the typewriter.

01\31\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory 10 hours.

02\01\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory nine hours.
This evening Irving and I went
to Woodtick to instruct a class
indrumming. We had frosted
coke, cocoa, and other refreshment
which Miss Cornelius prepared.

{02\02\1902 Sunday [no entry]}

02\03\1902 Monday
Yesterday the weather was wet, stormy,
and cold. The wind blew a gale.
In the afternoon I attended divine service
at the Mill Plain Chapel. The Rev. Mr.
Parry of the Grand Street Baptist church
officiated. After supper Mary and I
went down to Father's. We had not been
there when the fire alarm whistle
blew three blasts which was a signal that
there was a fire in exchange place. This was
at 6:30 P.M. Wm. Gillette, who was there, thought
that it might be his father's office, as he had
had a large wood fire there in the afternoon,
and he started to take the trolley car
to go down.
Iva happened to go to the kitchen and
called our attention to the red sky
and I saw a blaze which led me to think
that a big fire had started, so I slipped
on my overcoat and articles and started
but met Will outside of the yard coming
back. He said that it was a big fire
and he wanted to take his horse, so we
went to he barn and hitched him into
Father's buggy and started first on a trot
then a gallop, and finally on a run. We
left the horse at Philo B. Norton's stable
and walked to exchange place which we
reached at 6:50 and found that the fire was
at Reid & Hughes dry goods tore on the
West side of Bank street.
The wind was blowing fierce and soon
the building was wrapped in flames and
the ajoining buildings were igniting.
Then a general alarm calling out the en-
tire fire department of the city was sounded
but it was to non purpose. The flames spread
to the buildings on the East side of Bank
street and across, sweeping all before them
to South Main street, which it crossed,
and burned the buildings to Brook street.
They also spread to the Franklin Hotel
and burned the long row of blocks
along Grand Street to Levenworth street.
Chief enginer Snagg and Mayor Kilduff,
seeing that the center of the City was
likely to be burned out, called on Hartford,
New Haven, Bridgeport, Torrington, Nagatuck,
and Watertown for help, and they all responded
by sending hose pipe and steamers, so at
one time we had seven steamers at work.
By midnight the fire seemed to be under
control and I came home. At 2 A.M. I looked
and could see no signs of fire but at 5 the
heavens were all aglow, and the wind
still blowing. When I went to work I drove
down and found that the Scoville house
was in ruins, it haveng taken fire
at about two o'clock, from some unknown
cause.
The fire had burned, besides the Scoville
House, all but three blocks from Center
Street to Grand street, on the West side of
Bank, and the same number on the East
side, and all but three blocks from
exchange place to Scoville street on the
West side of South Main, and four on the
East side, and all the buildings from
Bank to Levenworth streets, on Grand,
except the Waterbury Bank and one house.
The loss is estimated at $3,000,000. Such a
fire was never known of before in this
City, and probably not in the state.
At about nine o'clock fifteen strokes were
sounded on the City hall bell which
out the entire militia force, and they
were set on guard duty at the streets
where the firemen were at work and
also to guard the property which had
been saved.

02\04\{1902} Tuesday
Worked ten hours at the factory.
The chief topic of conversation of every-
body has been the Great Fire. Last
evening a train from Meriden brought
over 500 people, and the City is filled
with strangers to day.
There were thirty buildings destroyrd
by the fire, and more than one hundred
business establishments.

02\05\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
The City is thronged with visitord
who come to view the ruins of the
fire.
The train that brought the steamer
from New Haven was comoposed of
an engine, flat car, and caboose, with
the firemen in the caboose when they
left New Haven, but soon the speed in-
creased so that the steamer began to
rock on its fastenings on the car
and the firemen had to go out and
hold it on. The train went faster, and
faster, till it passed the beacon where
they saw the fire, and the engineer
threw the throttle wide open and the
speed was so great that the men feared
they would be swept from the car in
going round the curves. This together
with the driving snow and wind
benumbed them so they were nearly
frozen when they reached Waterbury.
They declared that the speed and cold
made it the most diagreeable ride
ever taken in this vicinity. The run
from New Haven to Waterbury was
made in thirty two minutes.
The run from Hartford was made in
forty one minutes. A man who was
at the depot at New Britain when
the train passed told me that he saw
only a streak as it passed.

02\06\1902 Thursday
Worked as usual.
This evening Irving and I worked ironing
Arthur Merriman's milk wagon.
Mary and Clyde went to the Grange.

02\07\{1902} Friday
Worked as usual. I went
to town to night after work.
After supper we worked on the milk wagon.

02\08\{1902} Saturday
Worked as usual.
Irving and I went to Mr. Cornelius to
teach the boys to drum.

02\09\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Caskey, who is assistant to Mr.
Lewis of St. John's Church, preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.
News has reached us to day that a great
fire is raging in Paterson, New Jersey.
The loss has already reached millions.

02\10\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
The loss at the Paterson fire is reported
at $2,000,000.

02\11\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory.

02\12\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory. This evening we
went to the Chapel. During the entertainment
I recited "The Song of the Camp."

02\13\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This evening I worked ironing Arthur
Merriman's milk wagon.

02\14\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory as usual to day.
This evening we worked on Arthur Merriman's
milk wagon.

02\15\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Margaret Julia Mills and I went to
Woodrick this evening.

02\16\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Moffett preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.
I had to work at the shop six hours.

02\17\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
About 15 inches of snow fell to day.
The girls on the hand burnishing and
machine burnishing rooms went home
at noon.

02\18\{1902} Tuesday
Worked ten hours.

02\19\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
We got up this morning at 5 o'clock
and the boys and I put the wagon
body on the sled so that Irving
could get a load of coal this afternoon
At half past five I went to Mr. Able's and
got Miss Agnes and carried fer in the
sleigh down past the Mattatuck factory
as the snow drifts were very deep along
the Doolittle road.
At quarter to seven I left home and went
to work. Pierpont {is} going to bring back
the team.
After work to night Pierpont came
after me and we went to Turnbull's
store and saw the famous painting of
the blacksmith which is valued at $50,000.
After supper I filed a saw for Wilson Pierpont.

02\20\1902 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary, Clyde, and I went to the
Grange.

02\21\{1902} Friday
Worked as usual to day.
It has snowed nearly all day but only about
5 inches has fallen.

02\22\{1902} Saturday
Washington's birthday.
When I got up this morning at 5 o'clock I
looked out and saw that the snow lay deep
on the ground and it was still snowing hard.
We dug out the paths about the house and
barn and then hitched up old John into the
pring, and Clyde started ahead horseback
with old Nell and we went up the Doolittle
road to Manson's corner and broke out the
road. When we came back we stopped at Mr. Abel's
and Mrs. Abel wished us to get some pancake flower
and 50 cts worth of fresh pork when we went to
town.
We started for town about half past nine and
as there had been only one team in the Cheshire
road it was slow traveling. We went first
to J. G. Jones's insurance office in the Apothecaries
Hall where I had the insurance on my shop
renewed, which expired yesterday. The amount
was $1000 and the premium I had to pay was
27.00. We then got a lot of groceries at Turnbull's
general store on East Main St. Some oysters
at Hemingway's, and a box of crackers at
the National Biscuit Co.'s. Mr. Abel's goods
we got at Mc Carty's.
Business in general was at a stand still, although
a few shops were running. The trolley cars only
ran from the Car barns to the center.
It stopped snowing at about five o'clock and
the snow is about two and one half feet
deep on the level, including the 15 inches that
fell a few days ago.

02\23\1902 Sunday
This morning we went to the Chapel and
dug out the paths. No teams got through
the Meriden road to day. The drifts are
very deep.
There were 26 at the Sunday school, but
there was no service. At about six this
evening two engines came in the Meriden
railroad and plowed it out, but they
have only got the trolley cars running
to Benedict and Burnham's, on the South
Main street line.

02\24\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory as usual.
A stranger who was a tramp and whose home
is in Mass., was discovered by Dr. Axtelle
to have the small pox as he was talking
with two policemen on Bank street this
forenoon. He was immediately taken to
the pest house, and an old man who had
had it sent to take care of him. He was
aged 28 years. He had stayed in the police
station one night and in the Salvation
Army home three nights, so that a large
number of people had been exposed.

02\25\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This morning I drove to Hiram Able's and
got Olive and Agnes and carried them
to the Trolley car track at Silver street
as they could not walk on account of the
deep soft snow, it having rained all
night. This evening I went to town after
work, and brought the Abel girls home
from the end of the trolley track. The
slush was knee deep most of the way
and the Doolittle road was nearly
impassible.

02\26\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
The weather to day has been rather warm,
and the travelling very bad.
This morning I carried the Abel Girls to
Silver Street and met them there at night
and carried them home.

{02/27/1902} Thursday
Worked to day at the factory as usual.
This morning I carried the Abel girls to
the trolley cars so that they could go
to work. The travelling was the worst I
ever saw. This evening when I went to
the trolley cars to meet the Abel girls.
(Agnes works in the New England Watch
shop, and Olive works at Rogers Bros.)
I found a long line of men and women
standing on a point of firm snow that
ran out into the slush which was knee
deep. I drove out to them and carried
them to the sidewalk corner of Silver and
East Main Streets I had my large box sleigh
and made two trips.
I then carried the Abel girls home.

02\28\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This morning I sent Clyde up after the
Abel girls, and then carried them to
Silver street. It has rained hard nearly
all day and this evening when Pierpont
came for me at the shop I soon had a
big load of girls in my sleigh who wished
to be carried to the side walk on East
Main Street I carried one load and came
back for another, in the two loads I carried
about thirty. I then carried Bertha French
and Olive Abel home.

03\01\1901 {1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory ten and one half
hours.
This morning when I got to the shop they
had cut the 24 inch belt off the engine
fly wheel on account of the high water.
It took till 8:30 to put it on again and
then it ran till 4 o'clock when the high
water forced us to cut it off again.
The weather has been very warm and
the snow has melted fast.

03\02\{1902} Sunday
This day I worked at the factory from 9 till
2 o'clock, putting on the 24 in. main
belt which was taken off yesterday after-
noon on account of the high water
while we were putting it on the river
rose over a foot, as it was raining
very hard and the weather was warm.

03\03\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory as usual.

03\04\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual.
The doctors are having a rush of business
vaccinating people. They charge one dollar
each and some of them vaccinate over one
hundred a day.
The snow is nearly all gone and the
weather is warm.

03\05\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours. This is pay-
day and I received my pay Fifteen dollars
and nineteen cents for last week's work.
This morning it began snowing at about
8:30 o'clock and has kept it up ever since.
There is about nine inches on the ground.
This evening Irving came for me with
the wood sled, and I carried Olly Able,
Elsie Anderson, and Bertha French, home.

03\06\1902 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange.

03\07\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

03\08\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This evening it stormed hard and I
stayed home and worked on picture frame.

03\09\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Caskey preached at Mill Plain
Chapel.

03\10\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
It is reported that there are 15 cases of small-
pox in town to day.

03\11\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual.
All of the employees of the New England
Watch Factory are ordered to be vaccinated
by Drs. Axtelle and Anderson at the
Company's expense. They began at 9 o'clock
yesterday morning.
All of the school children are ordered by
the board of education to be vaccinated
by next Thursday or they cannot attend
school.

03\12\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Another case of small pox has broken
out this morning and the patient has
been removed to the pest house.
All of the school children in the out
lying districts are ordered vaccinated
by next Monday or they cannot attend
school Supper and Entertainer in
charge of the Young men.

03\13\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.

03\14\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
There were two more cases of small
pox reported to day making eighteen in
all.
Gregory Byrnes, son of Stephen, was
drowned in the mud hole opposite the
Farmers Home this afternoon he was
aged seventeen years.

03\15\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day 10 hours.
This evening Irving and I went up
to Mr. Clemmet Cornelus in Wood-
tick and gacve the Wolcott boys a
drumming lesson. We stayed there till
9:15 o'clock when we drove down
to Theodore Munson's where a large
number of friends and neighbors had
assembled and surprised Mrs. Mun-
son. It being her birth-day 33 years
old, we stayed there till after midnight.

03\16\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Pruner preached at Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.
This forenoon I rode horseback out to
Morris Burger's in prospect, and from
there to Henry Hodges and then North
up the old Bound road and across the
lots by the old Poach place onto the
Scott road and home. The mud was
breast deep on the horse in many
places.

03\17\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
This morning we sent the children
to school, but the teachers sent
them home again because they had
not been vaccinated. There were only
about 18 out of the whole three rooms
that were vaccinated. In the three
rooms were about 100 scholars.

03\18\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The factory commenced working till
7 o'clock last night, but I did not work.
This evening I vaccinated Margaret, Ruth,
Frank Pierpont, and Raymond with
vaccine points purchased of H. W. Lake
for 10 cts.

03\19\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
There are 23 cases of small pox in
town now. Mary vaccinated me this
evening.

03\20\{1902} Thursday
I worked at the factory to day ten hours.
This evening Mary and I went to the
Grange.

03\21\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This afternoon notices were posted in
all the rooms at the factory to the effect
that all of the employees not previously
vaccinated must be at the expense
of the Company.

03\22\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This evening Irving and I went to William
French's at Wolcott Center and gave drum-
ming lessons to about a dozen of the Wolcott
boys. We had a rough muddy ride. In
some places the mud was so deep that
the wheels went in up to the hubs.
Although the snow has been all but gone about
here for some time, there are many drifts
left in Wolcott. There was one near the
Fairground where the road from Hag-
field comes to the main road that is
six feet deep.

03\23\1902 Sunday
To day I worked at the factory seven hours
putting up a set of idle pulleys over where
the roughers out men work.
Rev. Mr. Davenport preached at Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.
Yesterday Dr. Anderson came to
the shop to vaccinate the people that
work there. There were but 38 vaccinated
out of the 400 that work there.

03\24\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

03\25\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

03\26\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening all of us went to the
Chapel to the supper and entertainment
given by the Young people.
To day Clyde took old Nell down to Sackett's
stable and had her sold at auction. She brought
15.00.

03\27\1902 Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Mary and I went to the Grange.

03\28\{1902} Friday
This is "Good Friday", a legal holiday.
Business is generally suspended but our
shop worked except the packing, buffing,
plating, and burnishig rooms.

03\29\1902 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Clyde, Irving, Harry
Buckingham, and I went to Mr. Cornelus's
house in Woodtick and gave a drumming
lesson to the following boys:
Clemmet, Gustave, and Charlie Corneilus,
Chris Tuttle, Francis Taft, Edward
Garthwait, Elair Baker, and several others.
The weather to day has been damp and
foggy and the roads were quite muddy.

03\30\{1902} Sunday
They wanted me to work at the factory
to day connecting the main shaft with
the new shaft that they are putting through
the center of the polishing room, but my
arm which was vaccinated has been
so bad that I did not work, and could
not, and I am very glad as I do not like
to work Sundays.
Rev. Mr. Fletcher of Oakville preached
at the Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.
This is Easter Sunday and the Chapel
looked very nice with all of the flowers
about the alter.

03\31\{1902} Monday
This morning I went to the factory
and worked one half hour when I came
home because I did not feel well from
the effect of vaccination.
This forenoon the boys and I began
painting the house white.
This evening the following members of
the Mattatuck Drum Corps went to
Nangatuck and attended a concert and
sociable given by the Nangatuck Drum
Corps. Fifers: Clifford Heaton, Harry
Buckingham, Sam Squires, and Clyde
Miller; Snare Drummers: Howard
Neal, Irving Miller, myself and
Gardener Hall; Bass Drummer:
Henry Buckingham.

04\01\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at factory.

04\02\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This morning, about 6 o'clock, the fire
bell on City Hall and the Fire
alarm whistle on the electric power
house sounded number 54 and it
turned out to be at the corner of River
and Baldwin Streets. The fire was caused
by one Mrs. Stack, who lived on Pemberton
street who it is supposed attempted to light
a fire with kerosine oil by pouring it
from a lamp into the stove. The lamp
exploded which set her clothing on fire
and she was burned to death. Her husband
who was asleep in an ajoining room
rushed in and tried to save her but
he was also burned so that it is ex-
pected that he cannot live.
A young son of Mr. and Mrs. Stacks
died yesterday and they had a Wake
last night which lasted till 5 o'clock
this morning when the last of the
people went away.

04\03\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This evening Mary and I went to the Grange.

04\04\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory.

04\05\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory.
This evening Margaret, Ruth, and I
went to Woodtick and I gave a lesson
in drumming to a class of boys.

04\06\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Parry preached at Mill Plain
Chapel.

04\07\1902 Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The weather has been dull and rainy.
This evening I worked finishing and
varnishing eight oak picture frames
that I had made for pictures 14 X 18 inches.

04\08\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The small pox has broken out in the
family of Mr. Trepania of Silver street
again, and they have two policemen
guarding the house.

04\09\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory.
This evening all of my family attended
the supper and entertainment given
by the married men at the Chapel.
The supper was excellent and the enter-
tainment the best so far this season.

04\10\{1902} Thursday
Worked as usual.
After work I went to town.

04\11\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory of Rogers & Brothers
ten hours as usual.

04\12\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
Freddie Jones went to work at the factory
this morning.
This evening Irving, Harry Buckingham
and I went to William French's house
on Wolcott hill and gave drumming in-
structions to Clement & Cornelis,
Gustave Cornelis, Elmer Coe, Francis
Scott, Marty Taft, Hilaire Baker,
Edward Garthwait, Theodore Wielers,
Cyrus Tuttle, Rollo Hammel, and
Herbert Snow were not there.

04\13\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Stanfield of Waterville
preached at the Chapel this afternoon.

04\14\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Dr. Kilmartin, the health officer, reports
finding three more cases pf small pox
to day. This makes more than 50 cases
that the Board of health claims to have
found, but it is my opinion that there
is not a case of genuine small pox in
the City of Waterbury.

04\15\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

04\16\{1902} Wednesday
Worked in the factory.

04\17\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory as usual.
Got up at 5 o'clock and painted on the
house till it was time to go to the shop
and painted again after supper.

{04\18\1902} Friday
Worked as usual in the factory.

04\19\1902 Saturday
Worked at the factory till half past
four.
This evening I went to Wolcott to give
a lesson in drumming to a class of
boys. Margaret and Ruth went
with me and I left them at Mr.
Clement Cornelius's in Woodtick
while I went to Mr. Harvey Coe's
at Hagfields and instructed the
boys.

04\20\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bassett of the Farm Street
Methodist Church preached at Mill
Plain Chapel to day.

04\21\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual. Dr. Linsley of Hartford
and Dr. Townsend of New Haven,
members of the State board of
health, were in town to day and
examined the patients at the Pest-
house, and 30 others who are sick at
their own homes, 70 in all and pro-
nounce it small pox.

04\22\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Mary, Irving, and I went to
the Chapel and got the tables etc. ready
for the fair which is to be held tomorrow
night and the night after.
The girls came and trimmed the tables
and booths etc.
There were Alice Beckwith, Bertha and
Clara French, Agnes and Olive Able,
Mrs. Munson, my wife and others,
Clarance Warden, Clifford Heaton
Irving, Robert Beckwith were also there,
beside Hiram Abel.

04\23\1902 Wednesday
This morning I repaired the buggy till
it was time to go to the shop.
I went to work as usual at Rogers & Bros.
but soon went to the factory of Rogers
& Hamilton on the upper end of North Main
Street and worked there with Laurence Tobin
and John Templeton taking out machinery
till twenty minutes to twelve, when
we took the trolley car and came to
Rogers & Bros. factory and had our dinner
we then went back and took down shafting
etc. till night, the machinery and shafting
is to be brought to Rogers Bros. factory.
At 5.15 we came again to Silver Street on the
electric car and Tobin and Templeton went
to the shop and I came home.
The Fair at Mill Plain Chapel opened
to night, but I did not go, as I felt tired
and sick, but went to bed at 8 o'clock.
I would like to note here that Mrs.
Homer Twitchell of Union City died
Sunday afternoon at one o'clock of an
internal cancer, she was buried at East
Farms cemetery yesterday afternoon
by the side of her former husband Mr.
William E. Austin, she was formerly
Miss Hattie Ashton.

04\24\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory.
This evening I went to the Fair at the
Chapel, there was a large attendance
and the entertainment which consisted
of music by an Orchestra was good.

04\25\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening we painted on the house.

04\26\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Clyde, Irving, Harry
Buckingham, Clifford Heaton, and I went
to Woodtick to the house of Charles S. Tuttle
to give instructions to my little drummers.

04\27\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Davenport preached at the Chapel
to day.

04\28\{1902} Monday
Worked as usual to day.
This morning and evening we painted on
the house.
The Mattatuck Drum Corps held a meeting
this evening.

04\29\{1902} Tuesday
Worked as usual.
This morning we painted on the house.
This evneing it rained a little so we
plowed the East garden partly.

04\30\{1902} Wednesday
Worked to day in the factory of Rogers &
Brothers.
The Government of the United States appro-
priated yesterday $130,000.00 for a public
building in Waterbury.

05\01\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

05\02\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

05\03\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory.
This evening Irving, Harry Buckingham
and I went to Wolcott and taught a number
of boys to drum.

05\04\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon, the building was
well filed.

05\05\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory as usual
to day.
{last sentence is unintelligible??}
Corps held a meeting in my carriage
house, and elected the following officers
for the coming year. Leader, Clifford
Heaton, assistant Leader Irving
Miller, Secretary Charles S. Miller,
Treasurer Gardener Hall.

05\06\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to James Slovell's
and paid my last year's school tax which
amounted to $21.00 and interest 1.60 rate of
taxation 15 mills.
We learned to day that a great fire last
night destroyed the central part of the
town of New Milford causing a
loss of $500,000.00.

05\07\1902 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day, ten hours.
This evening we finished planting our
onions.

05\08\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evneing everybody attended an
orange supper at the Chapel which
consisted of orange shortcakes, oranges
cut up, and meats, pies etc. etc.
There was also a fine entertainment
which consisted of recitations, singing,
violin and piano, music etc.
The Chapel was well filled to overflowing
and the net proceeds were about thirty
dollars and a profit of about $20.00.
I presented the Chapel with one dozen
silver spoons, one dozen silver knives
and forks, which Mr. Frank Ells of Rogers
& Brothers gave me.

05\09\{1902} Friday
Worked at Rogers & Brothers as usual.
After work to day I went to towna nd bought
a pair of shoes at Allen and Bradley's for
$1.25.

05\10\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This evneing Clyde, Irving, Harry Buckingham,
Clifford Heaton and I went to Harvey Coe's
in Wolcott and taught about seventeen
boys to fife and drum.
After we were through practicing they
passed "raspberry schrub" to drink.

05\11\1902 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Stanfield of the Waterville episcopal
church preached at Mill Plain Chapel this
afternoon.
This afternoon I measured the walnut tree
which we set up about three rods eastward
of the North East corner of my house and it
measured one and one half inches.

05\12\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening the Mattatuck Drum Corps
met for practice, on motion of Howard
Neal it was voted that the dues be
paid during the past winter months.

05\13\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual to day.
We finished painting the windows in
our house to day.
This evening Constable Ray Perkins came
and summoned Mary to appear before
the Superior Court at Waterbury to-
morrow at 10 o'clock as creditor in a
case against Austin B. Pierpont who
assigned insolvent debtor in March
1899.

05\14\{1902} Wednesday
This morning I got up at 5 o'clock and
marked out a pair of homes for Clyde to take
to town and have sowed out on a band saw.
I then ate my breakfast and went to the
shop where I worked one hour oiling up
the shafting, I then came home and changed
my clothes and Mary and I walked to
the trolley car at Silver Street and then
rode to the center, and went immediately
to the Court house on Levenworth Street
where the Superior Court met at ten o'clock
Judge Robinson presided.
The charge of fraud was brought against
Austin B. Pierpont and his son Arthur
J. Pierpont and an attempt was made
to prove that Austin sold his farm
to Arthur on Mar 1st 1899 to prevent
those that he owed from having it
when he assigned in June 19.00 the
witnesses for the plaintiff were William
Tyler of Bucks Hill, Chas Bennett, of
Cheshire, Warren Hall of Waterbury,
Valentine Bohl of this City, Mr. Linsley
of Woodbury, Henry Nettleton of Washing-
ton, Mrs. Austin B. Pierpont, Mrs. Mary
A Pierpont, and my wife.
TGhe Witnesses for the defense were
Austin B. Pierpont, Arthur J. Pierpont,
Edwin Todd of Marion, George W.
tucker, John Pierpont, D.B. Wilson and myself.
The creditors claimed their several
amounts aggregated over $29,000 and
placed the price of the farm at $10,000.
It was proved that Arthur bought the
farm in good faith not knowing of
his father's indebtedness at the time,
and the Judge decided the case in his
favor.

05\15\{1902} Thursday
I got up at four o'clock this morning and
Clyde and I went to Hiram Able's and
ploughed his gardens, we got home soon
after six, and I ate my breakfast and went
to the shop.
Irving dislocated his thumb this even-
ing while jumping over the fence in
front of the house.
Dr. Lodge set it, charged $1.00.
Mary and Clyde went to the Grange.

05\16\{1902} Friday
Worked in the shop to day.

05\17\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Went to Wolcott this evening.

05\18\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Moffett preached at Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.
The consolidated Rail Road commenced
running regular trains from Waterbury
to New Haven, by way of Cheshire to
day.

05\19\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\20\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
To night Mary and I went to Middlebury
and attended the Grange meeting there.

05\21\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\22\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

05\23\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory as usual.

05\24\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory as usual.
This evening I went to the City
to see George Platt about turning
out Decoration day.

05\25\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Davenport preached
at the Mill Plain Chapel this
afternoon.

05\26\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory as usual.
The Mattatuck Drum Band met at
my house this evening.

05\27\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual.
Last night the horse that Clyde
and Arthur Merriman were
peddling milk with got frighten-
ed at the cars at Silver Street
and dashed down past the
spoon shop just at the people that
work there were coming out,
there were many narrow escapes.

05\28\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory this day.
This evneing the Mill Plain Chapel
Society held its annual meeting
at the Chapel and elected the following
Officers Committee to represent the
Episcopal denomination Austin B.
Pierpont Com. for the Congregational
Charles S. Miller for the Baptist
Robert Warden for the Methodist
Hiram Abel Secretary, Arthur J.
Pierpont Treasurer, Hiram Abel,
Organist, Inez Beckwith Sunday
School superintendant Mr. Judd
Librarian, Clifton Heaton
The Ladies Union reported a balance
of $177.93 on hand and the Chapel
Treasurer $56.25 making $234.18
cash on hand.
It was voted that the Chairman
of the Chapel Committee myself should pre-
pare a report for the past year and give
the same to the Sec.
It was also voted that I should buy
25 new singing books (the Church
Hymnary).

05\29\1902 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.

05\30\{1902} Friday
This is Decoration or Memorial day
and this morning Clyde, Irving,
and myself put on our Continental
uniforms and with Clifton Heaton
and Charlie Hotchkiss started
towards the Center drumming
we were soon joined by George
Cass and we marched to the
trolley cars at Silver street which
we boarded and rode to Grand Army
Hall on East Main Street, we were
here joined by the other boys so we
had the following.
Fred Pelitier, Drum Major
Charles Cass, Clyde Miller, Harry
Buckingham, and Clifton Heaton.
Fifers C.S. Miller, Bass drummer
Charles Hotchkiss, Irving Miller
and George Cass, snare drummers.
At 10 minutes to ten, the veterans of
{unintelligible sentence??}
to the Soldier's monument where the
line formed. Lieutenant Colonel Gettes
Chief Marshal, it was composed of
the American Band, Companies A
and G of the Conn. National Guard,
the Hubernian Rifles, the Veterans
of the Civil War, the Sons of Veterans,
the Veterans of the late Spanish war,
the Sacred Heat Drum Corps and
several civil organizations etc.
The line of march was along the
south side of the Green to exchange
place through Bank St. to Center to
Levenworth to Grand to South Main
to East Main, to Cherry, where we
countermarched to North Willow
Street then countermarched to
Grand Army Hall where we had
dinner.
At one o'clock we fell in and marched
to the Soldier's monument where
the exercises were held they consisted
of prayer by the Chaplain of the
S. of V. The reading of Lincoln's
Gettysburg Address by Mr. Byatt
an address, the best I ever heard, by
the Rev. Dr. Slocum, the firing
of three volleys, by a firing squad
of Co. A. a dirge by the Mattatuck
Drum Corps, and the Benediction.

05\31\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory as usual.

06\01\1902 Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.

06\02\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\03\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\04\{1902} Wednesday
To day Buffalo Bill's Wild West
Circus exhibited in Waterbury. The children
went down and viewed the parade, they
said that they counted 225 horses in
the parade.
This morning early about five o'clock
Clyde, Irving, Pierpont and I went to
the Chapel and clipped the grass with a
lawn mower, and got the ashes out of the
cellar, and riddled them and put them on
the drive way.
We then came home and ate breakfast
after which the boys went and saw the
circus parade, and then went up to the
Branch Reservoir and then on to East
Morris, and back home, which they reached
at about 2.30 o'clock, having rode over
33 miles as their cyclometer on the bicycle
showed.
But I took the horse and went up to Mr.
Able's and ploughed his garden, which took
till noon.
This afternoon I made a pair of Homes for
plowing etc.

06\05\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
I saw by the papers that the terms of
peace were signed, last Saturday between
the English Government and the Boers
in South Africa.
The terms as published are, that the
Boer prisoners 25,800 of them be returned
from St. Helena, Bermuda, and India,
and all set at liberty that none of
the rebels in Cape Colony shall be
executed, that the Boer language
may be taught in the schools,
that the Officers of the Governments
of the Transs Valle and Orange Free
State shall be Dutch, that the Boers
must give up their fire arms, except
their rifles.

06\06\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory as usual.

06\07\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory 9 hours
but they give 10 hours pay at
Rogers & Bros. Saturday.
This evening I went to Mr. Harvey
Coe's in Wolcott and gave drumming lessons.

06\08\1902 Sunday
Rev. Mr. Lewis preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon.

06\09\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\10\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory.
I ordered of Maynard Merrill & Co.
of New York 25 copies of the Church
Humnary for the Mill Plain
Chapel.
To day when Mary brought my dinner
to the shop, she told me that some
one had entered Mother Pierpont's
house yesterday and took One Hundred
Dollars.

06\11\{1902} Wednesday
Worked as usual at the factory.
This evening The Ladies gave a Straw-
berry festival at the Chapel.
Mr. John Lines' Orchestra furnished
entertainment, I think without a doubt
his is the best orchestra in the City
as all of the musicians are experienced
professionals of the leading bands of
the City.

06\12\{1902} Thursday
Worked a the factory as usual.
Mrs. Francis French (formerly Pond) of
Torrington and first wife of William
French of Wolcott, was buried from
the Chapel this afternoon.
This evening Mary and I attended
the Grange, it was Flora's night
and she had a special entertainment
of Recitations, Music, Minstrels, etc.

06\13\1902 Friday
Worked as usual in Rogers & Brother's
factory.
This evening the voters of Saw Mill
Plains school district met in the
school house and transacted the following
business.
Elected Warren Hitchcock Committee
" B.F. Hoggett Clerk
" James Stovelle Tax Collector
" Martin Pond Treasurer
Voted to lay a tax of four mills on
the list of 1902
Voted to pay the committee $50.00
for the coming year. Voted to
comply with the recommendations of the
board of school visitors in regard to
repairing the school house.
Voted to adjourn at about 10 o'clock.

06\14\{1902} Saturday
Worked in the factory to day 11 1/2 hours.
This afternoon the factories of The Benedict
& Burnham Mfg. Co. The Holmes Booth &
Hayden's Co., The Waterbury Brass Co.
The Chase Rooling Mill Co., The Water-
bury Button Co., The Scoville Mfg.
Co., The E.J. Monville Machine Co.,
The Manville Co., The New England
Watch Co., The Waterbury Lumber and
Coal Co., The Randolph O. Clowes Co.
and several others, shut down, and
are to till next October and pay the
help full pay.

06\15\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bassett preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon.
I took 25 new Church Hymnaries to the Chapel
which I purchased of Maynard Merrill & Co. of N.Y.

06\16\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.

06\17\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Yesterday the proposed New Constitution was
rejected by the electors of Conn.

06\18\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at Rogers & Brothers as usual to
day.

06\19\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\20\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Mains Circus is in town to day and
Margaret and Ruth have gone to see it
with Clemment and May Cornelius.
To day has been the picnic of the East Farms
School, held in George Benham's Grove.
Mary and the little children went.

06\21\1902 Saturday
Worked at the factory.
This evening Irving and I shod the
horse and set one buggy tire.

06\22\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Dr. Davenport officiated at the Chapel.
This is Children's day and the Chapel was
crowded, the Children sung and recited,
Ruth received a present from Dr. Davenport
for not being absent from Sunday School
during the past year, it was a testament.
Ruth, Frank, Pierpont, and Raymond,
Henry Miller were baptised by Mr.
Davenport.
After service I drove out to the Lewis
burying ground near the Southington
reservoir and then North upon old road
and turned West and came out by
Arthur Ferrell's house, then over through
Woodtick home.
I then attended a Memorial service at
Grange Hall at which Dr. Anderson
officiated.

06\23\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

06\24\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual to day.

06\25\1902 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
It is reported that Edward II King of
England died this day.
Clyde and Irving howed James Porter's
potatoes this forenoon, and this afternoon
Irving and Pierpont got in the hay that
they mowed in James Porter's door yard
yesterday.

06\26\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This evening Mary and I attended the
Mad River Grange.
It is reported to day that King Edward
is not dead, but a little improved in
his health.

06\27\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
This morning the boys and I got up at
four o'clock and went down to Father's
and I mowed till six, when I came home
and went to the shop, but the boys
kept mowing till near noon and mowed
nearly all of the lot.
Father and Gussie went to Bristol
with a load of goods for Frank to day.

06\28\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to the Chapel
and counted the singing books and
found that there was 36 old books
there and 25 new ones.

06\29\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bruno preached at the Mill
Plain Chapel this afternoon, the attendence
was small as it rained very hard.

06\30\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day, we took out the
drivind pulley on the main shaft and put
on a larger one which was 78 inches in diam-
eter.
This evening I gave instructions in
drumming to Fred Jones, F. Pierpont
Miller, John Mulhurn, Seth Anderson,
Joseph Pierpont, Clarance Brown
and Walter Mills.

07\01\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\02\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory as usual.

07\03\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening Clyde, Clifton Heaton,
and Sidney Spender, left on the
six o'clock train on the Naugatuck
Road for New York to spend the
4th.
Mary and I went to the Grange
but I came home before it opened.

07\04\{1902} Friday
Bang, Bang, Bang, Pop, Pop, Pop there
has been a continual roar of cannon
and fire works in every direction
all day, this evening the heavens
were lit with rockets and Roman
candles in all directions, we went
up on the big rock on Red Oak Hill
back of Mr. Knops and had a good
view of them. I worked at hay this
afternoon, getting in 70 heaps from mr.
Mill's meadow.

07\05\{1902} Saturday
I did not go to the shop to day, but
worked about home this forenoon.
This afternoon Margaret, Pierpont, and
I went out on Southington Mountain
but the horse was taken sick and
lay down, so we came home.

07\06\1902 Sunday
Rev. Dr. Parry preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.
This evening I took Clyde over to
Arthur Merriman's in Southington
to have him ready for work tomorrow
morning, as he is going to peddle
milk for him.

07\07\{1902} Monday
Worked in the factory to day as usual.
I came home to dinner to day, for the first
time since I worked at Rogers & Bros. nearly 3 years.

07\08\{1902} Tuesday
Worked in the factory as usual.

07\09\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory.

07\10\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory as usual.
James Byrnes broke his leg last night
just above the ankle.
This forenoon a sheriff came to the shop
and read a warrant for me to appear before
the City court this afternoon to act as
juryman but later he returned and left
word that they did not want me till
tomorrow afternoon.

07\11\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory this forenoon.
This afternoon I went to the City Court in
the City Hall at two o'clock, and was sworn
with five others to act as juryman on
a case of eviction of one Mr. Cane
against Mr. Kelser, Mr. Cane owns a
house on Woodlawn Terrace which he rented
to Mr. Kelser on the 2nd of June he served
eviction papers on Kelser but he has not
evacuated hence the suit. The jury returned
a verdict for the plaintiff.

07\12\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory.

07\13\{1902} Sunday
Rev. mr. Barnes preached at the Chapel
this P.M.
Mr. Judd, Mr. Warden, Clyde and
I went over to Morris Park and
saw Mr. Hemmingway about holding
the Mill Plain Sunday School
picnic there.
We then went to Arthur Merriman's
and left Clyde, and then came
home.

07\14\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Irving went to work for Samuel Ovaitt [Oviatt]
at Goshen Center to day, he went by
train to Torrington.

07\15\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Susy Bronson and Charlie Brown
were married yesterday forenoon by the
Rev. Mr. Lewis of St. John's Church.

07\16\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\17\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\18\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.
Mary told me this morning before
I got up that she heard at the Grange
last night that Rev. Dr. Parry died
yesterday afternoon, and later I learned
he died very suddenly of neuraliga
of the heart, he rode to the Post Office
on his wheel in the afternoon and
not feeling well went home, and
was soon dead. He was pastor of
the first Baptist Church on Grand
Street and was aged 55 years.

07\19\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day, putting i a
new bulkhead and repairing the ditch.

07\20\{1902} Sunday
No service at the Chapel to day on account
of Dr. Parry's funeral.
This afternoon I went to the funeral
service of Dr. Parry at the 1st Baptist
Church of Grand St.
The church was crowded, there were twelve
ministers, nearly all took part in the
service. Father Slocum of the Church of
the Immaculate Conception was there.
This is the first time I ever knew a Roman
Catholic priest to attend service in a
Protestant church.
The remains are to be taken to Philadelphia
tomorrow for internment.
There were about 50 present at Sunday School
at Mill Plain.

07\21\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory.
The shop resumed operations to day
after a shutdown of three weeks, all
except the Burnishing, Buffing, Plating
and packing departments.

07\22\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory.

07\23\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory as usual.

07\24\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory.

07\25\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory.

07\26\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory as usual.

07\27\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Bruno preached at the
Mill Plain Chapel to day.

07\28\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.

07\27\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory.

07\28\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as
usual.
There was an Italian killed on the
Meriden Rail road this forenoon, a
little
East of the Horse Brook.
He with other laborers were on a
hand car, which they had just
lifted on the track, after the New Haven
train had passed, when an excursion train
bearing the Baptist and Methodiest Sunday
Schools of Simonsville, which were going to
Hanover Park came along round the
curve and struck the hand car throwing
the men in several directions and killed
one by the engine passing over him.

07\31\1902 Thursday
Worked in the factory to day.
The following rule is useful to obtain
the distance across the corners of a square.
Multiply the side of the square by 1.414.
To obtain the distance across the corners
of an octagon, multiply one side by
1.155.

08\01\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day.

08\02\1902 Saturday
This morning F. Pierpont and I got up
at 4:30 and went to the factory and oiled
up the shafting after which we came
home, ate breadkfast, and started for Jashen.
We drove first to Ferryville 9 miles,
then to East Church, 2 miles, thence to
Harwingston, 7 miles, thence to Farring-
ton 5 miles, there to Goshen 6 miles.
We left home at twenty minutes past
seven, and reached Samuel Ovaritt's
in Goshen at quarter to four.
We found Irving there at work gettin
in hay.

08\03\1902 Sunday
This morning we got up at about 5 o'clock
and I helped milk there was a hired
man by the name of Sam Mansfield.
Irving, myself and Samuel Ovaritt,
who did the milking, we milked thirteen
cows, after which Sam Mansfield ran
the milk through a separator {separator} which took
about 15 minutes, in the meantime
Irving and Sam had the choers {chores} done
and then we went into the house and
had breakfast, of pancakes, corned beef,
salt pork, potatoes, cake pie, etc.
After breakfast, we, Pierpont, Irving, and I went
for a walk up to the slaughter and on into the
woods, we followed a cart path for a long
distance, till we thought it time to start
home, when we started South West by the
compass, and came out onto the cart path
near where first entered the woods.
We then went to the house and got ready
and went to church, service began at 10:45
and ended at 12. the minister was from
Winchester who exchanged with the regular
preacher, the church is a fine one inside for
a country town, has stained glass memorial
windoes {windows}, pipe organ, nice class room, piano,
etc., etc. after service we went to Mr. Ovaritts
and had dinner of boiled chicken, etc,
and after dinner Irving and Sam Mansfield
froze some ice cream, which was very nice.
Irving and I then walked over to Canada village {villege}
one and half miles and visited with Fred
Lencus till after four when we came home
and ate supper, after which we did the chores
and then had ice cream again and visited
till bed time.
Rev. Mr. Smith of Simonsville Baptist church
preached at Mill plain Chapel.

08\04\1902 Monday
This morning we got up at five o'clock and
did the chores we then had breakfast of
pancakes and codfish which Rose Hubbard
had prepared for us. then after bidding
all of the folks good bye, except cousin
Marion and Mother Ovaitt [Oviatt], Pierpont
and I started at quarter to seven for
Waterbury. we came from Goshen center
through Litchfield, to East Morris
thence to the West Branch reservoir and
to Renals Bridge to Waterville where
we turned and came across country
to Lakewood and on home which we
reached at quarter to twelve, the day
has been very warm, and driving hot.
got ready and went to work at Rogers
and Bros. factory at half past twelve,
and worked till 5:30.

08\05\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual.
Mary and the children spent this day
at Abrinsons cottage at Hitchcocks pond
on Southington Mountain.

08\06\1902 Wednesday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
This day Mary went to Yalesville
with Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Todd and
attended a Phonological meeting at
the residence of Mr. Norris Barnes,
they also went through his peach orchards.
Margaret and Amy Miller went to
Bucks Hill visiting at William Fabers.
after work I went down town and did
several errands, and a few minutes
before six it began to rain hard and
we had the most severe thunder storm
we have had this season. I went up
Walcott street and paid Mr. Fowler $1.50
for a box of envelopes he had printed
for me, we then came home the rain
coming down in torrents till we were
nearly home. I put on some dry clothes
and drove to Mr. Todds he lives in the
North West corner of Cheshire, waited till nearly nine before
they came, then
got Mary and came home.

08\07\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory ten hours.
Mary and the children went to barn-
pounce pond the occasion {acassion} being the
picnic of the Mill Plain Sunday school.
there were about 88 there in all, some
40 went in busses and the rest in
private teams.
This evening I stopped at my shop and
Peter Larogue gave me a check for 20.00 for
last months rent.

08\{08}\1902 Friday
I worked in the factory to day.
This morning Pierpont and I worked in
the garden straightening {straitiening} up the corn that
the wind blew down during the storm
Wednesday.

08\09\1902 Saturday
Worked at the factory to day from 7 to 12:30.
and from 1 to 4:30. Nine hours at 10
hours pay each Saturday.
The great trolley car strike in New Haven
was ended this morning by the
Company taking back the men that
were discharged.
This evening I opened the Chapel for
the Choir rehearsal. there were but
four there, and they adjourned at
nine o'clock.

08\10\1902 Sunday
This morning Raymond and Pierpont
got up at about 6:30 and I arose soon
after, we did the chores {choers} and then
called Mary and the girls, and we soon
had breakfast of boiled meat and potatoes
etc. I then hitched up and Margaret
and Pierpont and I went out to Theodore
Munsons cottage at the pond on Southing-
ton mountain near Shelton Hitchcocks
and he gave me a ride in his new
gasonline launch, which ran at a rate
of about seven miles an hour.
at quarter to twelve we started for
home, and brought Mrs. Munsons
goods to her house, she is coming home this afternoon.
When we reached home we had dinner
of meat and pudding, after which we
got ready and went to Mill Plain Chapel
where Mr. Lewish preached. after service we
came home had supper, and I stayed about
home the rest of the day.

08\11\1902 Monday
Worked at the factory to day.
The great Trolley car strike in New
Haven was ended Saturday
night by the Company taking
back the men they had discharged.
At our shop the timmers, polishers,
buffers, etc. have joined unions and
last Saturday they sent a com-
mittee into the Office to try and
get more pay for the trimmers
but they did not succeed, what
the result may be I do not know.
The price of coal has advanced to
9.50 per ton, one year ago it was
about $4.00 per ton.

08\12\{1902) Tuesday
Worked at the factory.
The watch factory commenced work
yesterday after a vacation of two weeks.
Agness Able has not gone to work as
her mother is sick and needs her to
do housework.

08\13\1902 Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

08\14\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This morning was very foggy. I could
not see from one telephone pole to the
other.
Clyde got through peddlering milk
for Arthur Merreman to day.

08\15\{1902} Friday
Worked in the factory to day.
Clyde has about 250 points.
An expert from Boston has been
at the factory and he tells us that
we have 17 ft fall of water on our
wheels and one is a 40 inch 8" bucket
and the other 20 inch diameter 5" bucket
15 horse power.
The Chestnut Hill Reservoir in
Walcott holds 43,000,000 gallons of
water, Hitchcocks Reservoir
holds 39,000,000 gallons, and
Cedar Swamp 34, 000,000 gallons.
This evening I rode horse back to
James STovells and paid my Mill
Plain School tax $8.30.

08\16\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
This evening I went to the rehearsal
at the Chapel of the choir.
Clyde mowed yesterday and to day
in Porters swamp, and yesterday
brought home two loads of hay
and to day we put one load in
Fathers barn and one load on
our stack.

08\17\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Moffett of Waterville
preached at Mill Plain Chapel.

08\18\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day.

08\19\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
When I came home from the shop
to night there were three surveyors
at work in front of my house survey-
ing for a trolley road from Cheshire
to Waterbury.

08\20\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.


08\21\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory.

08\22\{1902} Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.

08\23\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory this forenoon.
Came home at 12:30 and ate dinner and
then we got ready to go to South Britain.
Soon Henry bass drove into the yard
and we hitched up and waited a while
for Charlie bass to come from Southing-
ton. after he came we started. Clyde
and Cliften Heaten in one team
with Fathers horse, charlie and Henry
bass in another buggy with Henrys
horse, and I with my two seated
canopy top. I picked up Henry and Harry
Buckingham down by the "Farmers
Home" and tied their bass drum on
the back of the wagon, and one snare
drum on each side and then we drove
through Waterbury Center and over
West-side hill and on through Middle-
bury and Southbury to South
Britain. we started at twenty min-
utes past three and reached South
Britain at quarter to seven.
We saw by way over many large pieces
of silo corn growing and a great abun-
dance of apples, potatoes, etc.
Met George bass and Charles Hotchkiss
about a mile this side of Britain
near the old flood bridge, they had
boys who took our teams and we
marched into the village playing
"Yankee Doodle",. After marching about
a while we went to the factory of
the Hawkins Co. where we found
Mr. Hawkins much surprised at our
coming. then with him Mrs. Hawkins
and Mable we went to a hall where
we found a fine supper awaiting us
which had been prepared {prepaired} by the
people, there were lots of good things
Salmon {samon}, dried beef, sandwiches, pressed
beef, rye bread, layer cake of all kinds
as well as frosted, each was served
with a plate on which were a piece of
squash, blackberry and apple pie,
chocolate {chockalet} creams and other candies,
ice cream, watermelon, bananas, etc.
etc. and as we ate some young ladies
played on the piano and at intervals
a graphaphone was playing.
After the supper was finished I in
behalf of the Abattatuck Drum Corps
thanked the people for the entertainment
and refreshments, after which we
played two or three tunes.
I would like to state here that provisions
kept coming in at the beginning of
the evening and the supply was so
great that they sent men out to tell
the people not to send in any more
and they fed every body in the Hall
yet there was a large quantity left.
AFter we had played in the Hall we
marched about the village and played
for the benefit of several ladies who had
never heard a Drum Band before.
We then marched to Mr. Hawkins factory
where we left our drums and then went
to the several places where we were to
sleep. Henry and Harry Buckingham
at Mr. John Squires, Charlie and George
bass, Charles Hotchkiss, Clifton heaton,
and Henry bass at Mr. Platts, Clyde
and I at Mr Hubbells.
In the morning we strolled about
the village after which we returned
to Mr. Hubbell's and had breakfast.
We then went down the street and
met the rest of the boys and at
quarter to eleven we went from Mr.
Hawkins factory to the Church in full
uniform and attended divine worship.
After church we marched back to the factory
after which we had dinner, and at about
five o'clock we started home, which we
reached at about 7 o'clock.

08\25\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory.
Clyde went to Sam Ovaitts [Oviatt's] in Goshen
today.

08\26\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.
Worked night and morning getting
saddle etc ready to go to New London.

08\27\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory.

08\28\{1902}
Worked at the factory to day.
Clyde and Irving came home from Goshen.

09\04\1902
Friday August 29 was Olive Abel's birthday
20 years old, the occasion was celebrated by
a party at her home in the evening.
This morning we got up at an early
hour; Clyde went down to Father's and
got his horse, while Irving got out
from Wilson Pierpont, and we saddled
up. I on my own horse {hourse}, and we went
over and had Miss Alice Beckwith take
our photographs, after which we came
home, fed the horses, ate breakfast,
and started for New London, rode
to Cheshire, thence to Yalesville, thence
to Durham, thence to Higgannum,
to Haddam, to Shaylerville, to Fuler-
ville, where we stayed over night
with Mr. John S. Warner, he hesitated at
first about keeping us, finally he said that
he could keep our horses, and we told him
that we could sleep on the barn floor, to
which he consented, we unsaddled and
put the horses in the barn and unrolled
our blankets, ate our supper of such
provisions as we had, then spread our
blankets on the hay and slept.
We traveled about 40 miles that day.
08\30\{1902} Saturday
We were awakened by a man coming
into the barn to feed the stock at
daybreak, we fed our horses, rolled up
our blankets and had breakfast in
the house of hash and pan-cakes, we then
paid Mr. Warner $1.50 for keeping, breakfast, etc.
He then showed us about his tobacco fields,
sheds, etc.
We had a piece of sumatra tobacco which had
just been cut of about three and one half
acres, which was covered with a cloth
tent 8 1/2 feet high, in making the top as
cover 1800 yards of coarse {course} cotton cloth
was used, it took a woman one month
to stitch it together, and she used $5.00
of thread, the sides were made of burlap.
His two tobacco sheds measured together
in length 350 feet and were 27 feet wide,
2 stories high and full.
We left Tylerville at about 7.20 and
soon came to the Universalist camp
meeting at Goodsperds Landing, where
we stopped a little while, and then drove to
the River, which we crossed of the Ferry
boat F.l. Fowler, on leaving the Connecticut
River we drove to Hadline where we
each bought four quarts of oats and
then drove on to North Lyme, the roads
through this region were very dusty
as there had been no rain in a month,
while at home it had rained nearly
every day. At North Lyme we got
permission of Mr. S. Nelson Jewett
to pass through his yard to the big
brook and wash our horses' backs, feed,
bathe, eat our dinners etc., while there.
Mr. Jewett came to see us, after looking
at our blankets, clothes, saddles, etc. that
were spread about on the grass, he ex-
claimed, I don't see how in the devil
you get all them things on those hourses'
backs. We asked him if he had any good
water to drink, to which he answered,
yes sir, you go up to that well by the
road {rode} and you will find as good water
as there is in this town or any other
town, or in this state or the United States
or any other country. he soon left us
and we saddled our horses and star-
ted for North Lime two miles distant.
We had just crossed the line into New London
county, and the weather was intensely not.
After, corn, and all kinds of crops (except
hay) seemed much better than here, the trees were loaded {loded}
with apples and all kinds
of fruit. After passing through the village
of N. Lime we traveled to East Lyme
or Flanders as the people there call it,
passing on the way Powers Lakes,
which were Natural beauriful lakes,
about one mile and one half long, each.
there were two of them, one on the North
side of the road, and the other on the
South side, about two miles apart.
after passing the last one, we came onto
the New London and Lyme turnpike which
is a fine wide road.
After leaving Flanders we galloped rapidly
on passing many places which had been
burned, some shops and factories, but many
were dwelling houses. I judge that we
saw at least twelve places that had
been destroyed by fire during the day.
Our road lay through a rich level country.
at about 4 o clock we crossed the head of
{Ni}antic bay and found a place to
put up our horses at Mr. Willis &
Minors, two miles West of New London
at a place known throughout that
region as Jardon, but on the map
as Waterford.
As Mr. Miner had no objections of our sleeping
in his barn we walked to the City and
bought our supper at the Globe restaurant
on Bank street and also bought provis-
ions for the next day. while we were
returning the heavens were lit up
by the flahshes of the search lights
on the Forts at Fishers, Phim, Gull,
and Block Islands.
We remained up sometime, then lay
down on our blankets and slept.
08\31\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Dr. DAvenport preached at Mill
Plain Chapel.
We were up this morning at about
six, ate our breakfast of crackers, cheese,
cakes, dried beef, etc., after wich we walked
to New London, went first to find
Edward C. Ford who once lived in WATER-
bury, but now is manager at N. Lon-
don for the Southern New England
Telephone Compant. He lives at No. 4
Summit Street, which we had a great
time in finding. and when we got
there his daughter told us that he had
gone to the beach to bathe. We then
went to the corner of Voxhall and William
streets and took a trolley car for ocean
Beach, which we reached in due time.
This beach fronts on the Sound and is
about one mile WEst of the lighthouse.
We watched the bathers quite a while
after which we started west along the
beach but were soon stopped by a creek
that came in from the North.
We then followed the bank of this
creek around till it brought us back
up the beach where we started, we then crossed
over the street and through some cottage
yards to the shore and we followed it till
we came to some private grounds near
the Light House.
Soon after we came to the beach we heard
the firing of heavy cannons off on Fishers
Island, and soon we saw a great WArship
leave the harbor and sail away to the
South West, the firing continued all the rest
of the afternoon, we soon reached a point
opposite the Peaquot House where we stopped
and wrote a letter home, Clyde writing the
events of the first day, I the second, and
Irving the third, we then walked up the
harbor street till we were tired, then we
took the cars and went to Voxhall street
and from thence to Mr. Fords', we found
him at home, and also found Mr. Walter
Morse of Waterbury there, had a fine visit
and he told us of a steam boat "Gipsey" that
left at 5 o'clock for Norwich. we were pleased
to take it and sailed up the Thames River
past the United States coaling station
at Groton, and saw the Old Man-of-War
Constitution (Ironsides) on the New London
side. the whole sail was one of the pleasantest
I ever enjoyed, it was Old Home week in
Norwich and everywhere, Flags, bunting,
and decorations, were in abundance.
We only stayed long enough to catch
a trolley car which took us back to New
London. the fare up, on the boat was 20 cts.
and on the trolley car we paid 5 cts. four
times coming down.
We immediately walked out to Mr. Miners,
ate our crackers, biscuits, etc. and lay down
on our blankets and slept.
09\01\{1902} Monday
This is Labor Day and is a Legal
hallow day. In New London there was a
parade of about 500 workingmen in line.
In other Cities it was observed by pa-
rades of Labor organizations.
We were up at an early hour ate our
breakfast of what was left from the
day before, and started for New London
but soon took a foot path across lots
for "Jordan" we soon came to a bridge
of a single plank a foot wide and about
two hundred feet long, which we crossed
and came to the center. there is an
inlet at this point that sets back from
the sound and we thought that we would
like to take a sail, so I went to a little house
by the side of the water and asked the women
ther if I could hire a boat, the old little
women said that we could take hers, so
we rowed down to the Sound about four
miles, and went in bathing, but the
water was very cold.
We then sailed back and paid the old
women twentyfive cents, then we walked
up the Rail Road to Fort Trumbull two
miles distant. we went all about the Fort
it is now out of date, and is only used for
headquarters for officers and troops. they
are taking the cannons out of it and are
carrying them actoss the river to Fort
Griswold. Fort Trumbull is finely
built of solid cut masonry, and must
have been impregnable, before the days
of steel rifled cannon, several of the
old cannon that are there now are
sixteen feet long with sixteen inch
smooth bores, and measure over four
feet across the britch on the outside.
After leaving the Fort we went to a restaurant and had dinner,
after which
we went to the dock and took a steamer for
Fishers Island which we reached in about
an hours' time. We walked at once to the
South end and saw the signal station,
search, light, lookout, etc.
The war ships had been sighted on all
were on the alert, the guards told us
that Block Island had been captured
by the fleet the night before, and
they expected an attack sometime
during the night, the pickets soon saw
us and drove us away, we then [went] over
to the camp where there were about
1100 troops encamped, the camp was the same
as other camps that I have seen, except that our
Regiment had steeple, instead [of] tents.
We went from the camp to the Mortar battery
but the guards would not let us near it,
so we went back in the rear of the works
on a hill about half of a mile away and
with the lid of our field glass was able {abel}
to see all inside. there were four mortars
in pits about thirty feet deep with walls
of solid concrete perpendicular {perpanticular} for about
thirty feet. these walls were on three sides
and the other side was open. the pit was
about thirty feet square, and at the top
of the concrete walls the earth slanted
up about eighteen feet higher, there were
two of these pits each containing two
mortars, on the front the ground slopes
to the water in the form of a natural hill,
while to the right and left of the pits
are the "Range Finders" and in the space
between the pits are the boilers, and mag-
azine. we then went over to Fort Wright.
the guards would not let us very near
this Fort so we saw but little except six
long range 12 inch rifled steel cannon
and two rapid fire guns, each of the
cannon had a pit for itself {itsself}, at this
Fort a man was killed a little while before
we got there, he was loading a cannon
and didd not have the cartridge clear in
and in closing the breech cap it struck
the head of the cartridge with such force
that it exploded, blowing him to atoms.
we stayed till twenty minutes to five,
the boat leaving at five, and the
dock was one and one half miles away.
we started byt the roads were so crooked
that we got bewildered and nearly got
left, with a bound we jumped onto the
boat after the wheel had begun to turn.
We reached New London and went to
the Eastern Ship building Company's
yards, where are building two of the
largest iron ships ever built. they
are for the Union Pacific Rail Road
and are to run between San Francisco
and Japan, and China. they are 625 feet
long and seventy eight feet high from
the ground to the top of the deck.
(We then climbed {climed} up Groton hights.)
I would here state that 1000 men have been
working on the ships two years and now they
have all of the men working on one of the
ships in hopes to get it finished by next
summer.
After ascending Groton hights we
visited Groton battle monument, but
could not go up it as it was too late.
In front of the monument stands a
long breech loading steel rifled cannon.
We then went over to Old Fort Griswold.
As far as I could judge it has not been
changed since Revolutionary times
and the ditch, walls, gates, and embank-
ments are much the same as then.
Where Colonel Ledyard stood when
Major Bromfild killed him with
his own sword, there is a granite
stone about 8 inches high, which is
enclosed by an iron fence. On the stone
was carved, On this spot Colonel William
Ledyars was killed by his own sword
in the hands of a British officer Sept
6th 1781.
We also visited the lower or Western
works of the fort. these have all been
made over, and mounted with heavy
cast-iron cannon, which are now
out-of-date, some of the guns have
been taken down, but the works
are well kept.
We remained on the parapet of the
fort till nine o'clock watching
the search lights, when we went
down and crossed the ferry and made
our way back to Mr. Miner's, where
we lay down, but were soon aroused
up by the heaviest firing of cannon
that I ever dreamed of. We went
outside, the heavens were lit up
by the red flashes, and the roar
was tremendous, jarring and shaking
everthing. The firing we learned since
was between the war ships and the Forts
on Gull Island, over 10 miles from where
we were.
There was firing at intervals during
the night so we did not sleep very
much, but at about five in the morn-
ing it commenced heavier and fas-
ter than before and continued for
about an hour.
We got up at 5 and cared for the
horses, ate our breakfast of such food
as we had, saddled our horses and started
for home.
We drove first to New London and bought
a "Morning Telegraph" to see an account
of the battle the night before, and then
rode out Broad street and kept on the
Hartford and New London turnpike,
came to Chesterfield, thence to Salem,
about three miles farther on we stopped
at a farm house and bought some bread
and milk for dinner, and fed our
horses, with oats that we bought of a
woman of Salem. we then set out for
Colchester, where we stopped {stoped} and Irving
had a shoe put on his horse, and I got
shaved. we then rode on to Abarlborough
where we bought some oats at a country
store, and then went on, but I was suf-
fering from a pain in my shoulder {shouldier}
and side, and told the boys to find a
place where we could stay over night.
we stopped {stoped} at the next house which proved to
be the best place I ever stopped {stoped} at. we had a
fine supper, good beds, good stables for
the horses, and a hearty breakfast of ham,
eggs, bread, potatoes, cake, pie, etc. the
Man's name was Frank W. Coleman, and
he lived 14 miles from Hartford on the
Hartford and N. London turnpike, in
the town of Marlborough opposite
Terrymugas Lake.
We left a little after seven in the morn-
ing and soon came to Marlborough Mills.
but alas, the mills are gone, the two large
cotton mills burned down some years ago and
the silk mill has moved its business to Paterson
New Jersey. we continued on through Glas-
tonbury, and East Hartford, passing on
the way hundreds of acres of tobacco,
everything throughout this region grew
thrifty and it seemed a sin that such good
land could not be put to a better use,
than raising that which is an injury to
mankind. we crossed over the temporary
bridge that spans {spands} the Connecticut
River, and through Hartford to West
Hartford, where we stopped {stoped} and Irving had
another shoe put on his horse, and we
continued on to Farmington where
we bought oats at a Grist Mill and fed
our horses, and ate our own lunch.
We then went on to Briston where we
ate supper with my brother Frank, and
stayed till about seven o'clock, when
we rode through Bristol, and Walcott
home, which we reached after nine o'clock.
Thursday I did not go to work to day
but this evening I went to the Grange
with Mary.

09\05\1902 Friday
I worked at the factory to day, had a hard
days work, as things were many that
needed to be done.

09\06\{1902} Saturday
Worked at the factory to day.
To day Clyde and Irving mowed what was
left not already mowed of James Porter's
swamp, and we put it into Father's barn
tonight.

09\07\{1902} Sunday
There was a memorial service held at
the Mill Plain Chapel this afternoon
at three o'clock, in memory of Rev.
Francis Parry of the First Baptist
church.
The Ministers present were Dr.
Davenport of the Second Congregational
Church, Rev. Mr. Bassett of St. Paul's Methodist
Church, Mr. Lewish of St. John's Episcopal
Church, Mr. Smith of the Simonsville
Baptist Church, Mr. Holden, assistant to
Dr. DAvenport, and Mr. Blanchard, a
retired Methodist minister.
The order of exercises were as follows.
Hymn, 589 Church Hymnary.
Invocation, Rev. Charles L. Smith.
Scripture Lesson, Rev. John. N. Lewish.
Prayer, Rev. Edward D. Bassett.
Hymn 943'
Address, Rev. John Lewis.
Hymn 938
Address Dr. John G. Davenport.
Offertory.
Hymn, 946
Benediction. Dr. John G. Davenport.

The chapel was crowded, and the collection
amounted to $10.02

09\08\1902 Monday
Worked at the factory.
This day a committee of Polisher and
Ragwheelers went into the office and
presented their grievance {grevence} to Mr. Rockwell.

09\09\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory as usual.
There is much talking about strike
to day at the factory.

09\10\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory.
This evening we attended the Peach
festival at the Chapel. there was a large
attendance. the net recips. are about $24.00.
Mr. John Limes and his Orchestra
furnished music.

09\11\1902 Thursday
Worked at the factory to day.
There is quite a little excitement about
strike, several committees called on
Mr. Rockwell, but he wishes them to
call tomorrow.

09\12\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Committees from the Trimmers,
Polishers, Roughingout, Ragwheelers,
and Buffers departments, waited on
Mr. Rockwell in the office and presented
grievances {grievencies} etc., as well a demand for
more pay.
It is said that he would give the pay,
but did not wish to do away with the
contract system {sistem}, or recognize the Labor
union at present.
Today Mary's sister Mrs. George W. Connor
of West Side Hill had an operation, in
the form of a removal of something
that stopped the passage of the
intestines, and the doctors found a
cancer. they say it is only a matter
of time, and that a short time before
she will succomb {secome} to it.

09\13\1902 {Saturday}
This is Clyde's birthday he is 18 years
old.
I worked at the factory as usual.

09\14\{1902} Sunday
Rev. Mr. Barnes assistant ot Mr. Lewis
of St. John's church preached at Mill Plain
Chapel.

09\15\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory.
This morning at 7.30 the rag wheelers
at the factory to the number of about
40 went out on strike, because they
were not given more pay. they were
soon followed by the Stampers who num-
bered 11 men, and soon a few of the trimmers
went out.

09\16\{1902} Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
The strikers are still out, and the Trim-
ming, two inspecting, two wash and
the muffle rooms will have to shut
down to night.

Ergot.
09\17\{1902} Wednesday
Worked at the factory to day.
The works at Rogers and Brothers
were shut down to day owing to
the strike.
This afternoon President with
the committees of the several rooms
met Mr. Rockwell and Mr. Tobin in
the Office and a partial settlement
was reached, and the mill will
start up tomorrow.

09\18\{1902} Thursday
Worked at the factory as usual
to day.
The factory started up this morn-
ing but not with a full force,
the rest are to come in tomorrow.

09\19\1902 Friday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
Nearly all hands came to work to day.

09\20\{1920} Saturday
Worked at the factory.
The girls at the Mattatuck shop struck
yesterday because they were cut down
25 cts. per day in their pay, and because
a man by the name of Saunders was put
over them as boss, in the place of Nellie
Cass.

09\21\{1902} Sunday
I worked at the factory five hours to day
putting new packing in the heater.
Rev. Mr. Bassett preached at the Mill Plain
Chapel this afternoon.
The strike at the Mattatuck factory has
been settled by the Company giving the
girls back the 25 cts per day.

09\22\{1902} Monday
Worked at the factory to day as usual.
This is Mary's birthday.
This evening the boys and I painted
one coat of lead {led} on the spindle buggy.

09\23\1902 Tuesday
Worked at the factory to day.

09\24\{