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Courses in Romance Languages

Fall 2015

RomL 110-580
Beginning Quechua
Prof. Mendoza-Mori
See Timetable for time

Quechua, the language of the Inca Empire and still spoken by approximately 6 million people throughout the Andes, is the most popular indigenous language of South America. The program focuses on the development of written and oral communicative abilities in Quechua through an interactive activity-based approach. Course includes an introduction to Quechua and Andean culture. Students will participate in pair, small-group and whole-class activities. Assessment is based on both students' ability to use the language in written and oral tasks and understanding the language and culture. This beginning level Quechua course is designed for students who have little or no previous knowledge of the language. Lectures will be delivered in English and Quechua.


RomL 250
History and Tradition
Prof. Feros
See Timetable for time


RomL 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

RomL 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

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Spring 2015

RomL 120-680
Elementary Quechua II
Prof. Mendoza-Mori
See Timetable for time


RomL 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

RomL 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language cquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

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Fall 2014

RomL 110-580
Beginning Quechua
Prof. Mendoza-Mori
See Timetable for time

Quechua, the language of the Inca Empire and still spoken by approximately 6 million people throughout the Andes, is the most popular indigenous language of South America. The program focuses on the development of written and oral communicative abilities in Quechua through an interactive activity-based approach. Course includes an introduction to Quechua and Andean culture. Students will participate in pair, small-group and whole-class activities. Assessment is based on both students' ability to use the language in written and oral tasks and understanding the language and culture. This beginning level Quechua course is designed for students who have little or no previous knowledge of the language. Lectures will be delivered in English and Quechua.


RomL 250
History and Tradition
Prof. Feros
See Timetable for time


RomL 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

RomL 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

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Spring 2014

RomL 110
Sicilian Language and Culture
Prof. Veneziano Broccia
See Timetable for time

Occupied over the centuries by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Normans, French, and Spaniards, Sicily is a region of many histories and many traditions. Birthplace and crossroad of cultures and artistic movements, the Sicilian land has shaped the imagination of its inhabitants and has never ceased to fascinate its visitors. Its language and culture have also been exported abroad, through the many Sicilians who left the island and settled all over the world. This course is an introduction to the Sicilian language and culture.  We will look at Sicilian grammar and at cultural artifacts ranging from film to literature, from music to food, in order to learn to recognize and understand the unique sounds and features of "siciliano" and to engage in conversation in Sicilian with native speakers and with one another. 

(Please note: the longer session allows for occasional film screenings.  The lessons themselves are 1 hour and 20 minutes).

This course will be taught in Italian and the materials will be in Italian, Sicilian, and English.

Students must have completed Italian 140 or its equivalent in order to enroll in this course.


ROML 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

RomL 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

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Fall 2013

ROML 512-401
History of Literary Theory
Prof. de la Campa
See Timetable for times

This course will focus on leading critical issues pertaining to literary and cultural studies today. The main emphasis will be on clarifying conceptual paradigms as much as possible, outlining their historical evolvement through readings of classical, medieval, and variously modern texts, in each case looking at ways in which these traditions continue to inform and imbue contemporary literary theory. The list of issues and questions will include the following: How does the concept of literature unfold through the legacy of textual critiques that derive from philological, formalist, Frankfurt School, reception theory, structuralist and post-structuralist modes of reading and understanding? Do postmodern, postcolonial and subaltern constructs offer new points of departure? What are the claims of diasporic, post-nationalist and post-humanist forms of writing and reading? Do gender and race theories play a significant role in them? Lastly, in what way do recent turns toward flat or descriptive modes reading, as well as the focus on materialities of culture challenge methods of close reading?

This course will be taught in English. It will be cross-listed with CLST 511-401; COML 501-401; ENGL 571-401; GRMN 534-401; SLAV 500-401; SPAN 682-401.


ROML 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

RomL 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

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Spring 2013

Romance Languages 290-401
Revolution, Dictatorship, and Democracy in Latin America: Politics and Literature
Prof. Ellis
See Timetable for time

While the words Revolution, Dictatorship, and Democracy signify radically different meanings, they exist in close relation to one another in discourse about Latin America. How does one imagine and articulate this dangerous proximity between the terms Revolution, Dictatorship, and Democracy that has yielded intense social, political, and economic effects for the lives of real peoples: civil war, genocide, recessions, migrations, diasporas, all of which today must be thought in relation to globalization. Yet out of these situations there also emerges aesthetics, and in this course we will focus on narratives. In our readings of several prominent novels that re-cast specific historical events in Mexico, Cuba, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Haiti, we will think through the complex allure of these terms, their menacing and contradictory intimacies with one another, which on today’s strange political map, may be more entangled than ever. We may study the following writers: Carlos Fuentes, Rosario Castellanos, and Roberto Bolaño on Mexico; Miguel Angel Asturias and Rigoberta Menchú on Guatemala; Roque Dalton on El Salvador; Reinaldo Arenas and Ena Lucía Portela on Cuba; Alejo Carpentier and Edwidge Danticat on Haiti. We will also watch several films – Robert Rodriguez’s Once Upon a Time in Mexico and Alfonso Cuarón’s Y tu mamá también, among others – which show how the discourse of Revolution can come to merge with that of nationalism, development, and neoliberalism, since – as opposed to the terms rebellion or insurrection – they are fundamentally concerned with the measured “progress” of nation-states. Final essays may be written in Spanish or English.


Romance Languages 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

RomL 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

Fall 2012

Romance Languages 296-401
Mexico, Mexican America: Nation, Diaspora and Globalization in Literature and Cinema
Prof. Ellis
See Timetable for time

The imaginaries of Mexican, Mexican American, and Chicana/o writers and film directors form this course, and three main movements will organize our readings and viewings throughout the fall. The first movement involves distinguishing the meanings of the word mestizaje in Mexican usages from its valences when used by Mexican American and Chicana/o artists in the US. Within this study of mestizaje, we will focus on different literary and cinematic portrayals of the icons of La Virgen de Guadalupe and La Malinche. Second, we will contrast romantic and violent narratives of the Mexican nation in the mid-20 th century and today. Within this movement, we will also consider the oft-stated claim that the border crossed Mexican American subjects in the late 19 th century, they did not cross it, how the geographic concept of A ztlán relates to this claim, and what it means today for the Mexican diaspora. In the third movement, we will study contemporary intensifications of the term “globalization” in literature and cinema. Mexico, la frontera, migratory changes, and the US southwest pose a tremendous quandary for the clear division of the world into three parts, and for globalization theories that discuss the macro-movements of capitalism and cities, but elide other nuances and re-alignments of bodies and spaces, and which politics and aesthetics are emergent therein. Moving imaginarily on foot, horseback, by car, train, and bus, through urban labyrinths and rural ranges, we will carry a Mexican and Mexican American compass to guide our critical thinking about the desire for place, the forces of displacement, and the aesthetic imperative of rendering alternative existences. The writers we may read are: Rulfo, Paz, Bartra, Anzaldúa, Castillo , R. Rodriguez, and Bola ño. The films we may study are: Nosotros los pobres (1947), El ángel exterminador (1962), Lugar sin limites (1978), El norte (1983), Sólo con tu pareja (1991), Amores Perros (2000), Y tu mamá también (2001), The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005), Babel (2006), Sin Nombre (2009), and Machete (2010). All films in Spanish have English subtitles. The final paper may be written in English or Spanish.


Romance Languages 512-401
History Lit Theory
Prof. Copeland
See Timetable for time


Romance Languages 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

Roml 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

Spring 2012

Romance Languages 121
Intensive Catalan Language
Prof. Espòsito
See Timetable for time

Pre-requisite(s): 200-level coursework in another Romance language or its equivalent.

This course provides an intensive introduction to the language of the Països Catalans, a geographical area that spans four countries and comprises over 9 million speakers who speak Catalan as either a first or second language. Working with authentic linguistic materials developed and presented within a uniquely Catalan cultural context, students will develop oral, listening, reading and writing skills in standard Central Catalan. When appropriate, we shall also discuss differences among the major regional varieties. The language of instruction is Catalan.

This course is recommended for students interested in studying in Barcelona.


Romance Languages 296-401
Repeating Islands: Caribbean Poetry and Cinema
Prof. Ellis
See Timetable for time

Arguably, the Caribbean’s best export continues to be the image of the islands themselves. One looks at a map and traces the curvature of possible pleasures from one warm, lush spot to another. What others from outside (and some from within) want, pay, destroy and exploit to see and what is experienced and seen by inhabitants is both the crisis and the bounty of the Caribbean – not just a blessing or curse, but something that invokes both. Throughout the 20 th century, Caribbean poets have worked within this crisis of the image, and Caribbean filmmakers have progressively joined the mimetic fray. What repeats from one island to another, and from poetic to cinematic form, is an intense concern about historic and contemporary representation. In this course, we will study the crisis and the fecundity of the image in 20 th Century Hispanophone, Anglophone and Francophone Poetry and Film, and will approach the arc of the Antilles with different desires. The final list of poets could include: Luis Palés Matos, Julia de Burgos, José Lezama Lima, Nancy Morejón, Reina María Rodríguez, Kamau Braithwaite, Derek Walcott, Aimé Césaire, Édouard Glissant and Monchoachi. The final list of films could include: Memorias del subdesarrollo/Memories of Underdevelopment (1968), La Carreta (1970), The Harder They Come (1972), Maluala (1979), Rue case-négres/Sugar Cane Alley (1983), Sucre Amer (1997), Suite Habana (2003), Biguine (2004), Heading South (2005) and Aliker (2009). Literary themes and movements (poesía negra, negritude, modernism, poetics of maroonage, conversational poetics) will be discussed alongside political and social shifts of the region (decolonization, revolution, nationalism, diaspora, globalization, sex tourism). We will discuss the registers of poetry and cinema in the study of the forms (prosody/poetic devices and cinematic devices, respectively). Students are welcome to write their final papers in English or Spanish.


Romance Languages 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

Roml 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

Fall 2011

Roml 112-680
Haitian Creole
Staff

See Timetable for time

This course serves as an introduction to communicating in the Haitian Creole language ("Kreyòl," for short), which we will use to explore the complex narrative of Haiti and its people.  The class is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Haitian Creole and draws on a variety of methods and media to develop students' abilities in oral and written communication throughout the semester, establishing a firm foundation for further study of the language. Students with research, professional, or personal interests in Haiti or the Haitian Diaspora are encouraged to enroll.  While prior exposure to French, the language from which Haitian Creole derives most of its lexicon, may be advantageous, it is neither assumed nor preferred.

Haitian Creole is spoken by over 12 million people around the world (including many in cities across the Eastern seaboard) and serves as a wholly developed language with a complete orthography capable of fulfilling the full range of expressive and communicative needs of its speakers.  It is also a language with a relatively recent history, dating back to the French colonization of Haiti (then called "Saint-Domingue") in 1697, and has thus been shaped by the same cultural and social forces that define Haiti's situation today.  Students should, therefore, expect our immersive study of Haitian Creole to extend to historical examination of the economic, political, sociological, and spiritual spheres within which the language was borne.


Roml 296-401
Contemporary Latin American Film
Prof. Ellis
See Timetable for time

This course will focus on select works from the rich and varied cinematic traditions of Cuba, Mexico and Argentina. Memorias del subdesarrollo [Memories of Underdevelopment] (1968), Mauvaise conduite [Improper Conduct] (1984), and Fresa y chocolate [Strawberry and Chocolate] (1994) will compose the Cuban section of the course. Los Olvidados [The Young and the Damned] (1950), Amores Perros [Love’s a Bitch] (2000), and Los Tres Entierros de Melquiades Estrada [The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada] (2005) will compose the Mexican section. And Bolivia (2001), Glue (2006), and XXY (2007) will compose the Argentine section. The following themes will be discussed throughout the course: the tension of the image and language on the screen; the Cuban Revolution’s Janus-faced quality as a celebrated and resented historical event; the force and consequences of U.S. American military interventions in Latin America; the detritus alongside the forms of employment that come with globalization and global capital; the manifestation of the “megacity,” particularly as a description of Mexico City today; the strength of informal economies and especially narcotraffic; the absurdity and the vigilant violence of the U.S.-Mexico border; the precariousness for migrants moving throughout Latin America given internal incongruities and differences; the ongoing reflux of memories of the dictatorship in Argentina; the relation between rural and urban national communities; sexuality, the state and violence – heteronormative and hetero-national – against gender performances that prove difficult to read and to place. In considering the relationship between filmic representation and the political, we will also be mindful of a relevant question today: What does it mean to live in a world that appears post-political? Philosophy and criticism on film by Alain Badiou, Slavoj Zizek, Jacques Rancière, Deborah Shaw, and criticism on stated themes by Néstor García Canclini, José Quiroga, Antonio Negri, among others, will be read. Students will have several short writing assignments throughout the semester, and a final paper. Films have English subtitles, so while knowledge of Spanish would enrich one’s experience it is not required.


Roml 512-301
History of Literary Theory
Prof. Kazanjian
See Timetable for time

This course will survey what has come to be know in literary and cultural studies as “theory” by tracking the genealogies of a select range of contemporary practices of interpretation. We will examine how these contemporary practices take shape as readings of classical, medieval, early modern, and modern texts. We will also consider how certain aspects of classical, medieval, and early modern texts have been left behind and, perhaps, still hold promise for literary theory today. This will allow us to address the following questions. What are some of the historical and rhetorical conditions of emergence for contemporary critical theories of interpretation?  What does it mean to interpret literature and culture in the wake of the grand theoretical enterprises of the modern period? How do conceptions of power and authority in literature and culture change as symbolic accounts of language give way to allegorical and performative accounts? Active class participation, a class presentation, and a final term paper will be the primary requirements of the course. A central, practical goal of the class will be to aid students in preparing for their MA Exam (for the exam reading list, see http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/Complit/handbook_exam_ma.htm)


Roml 690-401
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
See Timetable for time

Roml 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

Spring 2011

Roml 121
Intensive Catalan Language
Prof. Esposito
(See Course Timetables for time(s))

This course provides an intensive introduction to the language of the Països Catalans, a geographical area that spans four countries and comprises over 9 million speakers who speak Catalan as either a first or second language. Working with authentic linguistic materials developed and presented within a uniquely Catalan cultural context, students will develop oral, listening, reading and writing skills in standard Central Catalan. When appropriate, we shall also discuss differences among the major regional varieties. The language of instruction is Catalan.

This course is recommended for students interested in studying in Barcelona.


Roml 290
Art, the State, and the New Citizen in Contemporary Latin American Literature
Prof. Ellis
(See Course Timetables for time(s))

The Cuban Revolution, the national, economic and architectural promise of Mexican modernity, and Allende’s election in Chile mark three distinct moments in Latin American history of tension and hope. But Pinochet’s coup that ended in Allende’s death, the massacre of Tlatelolco following the occupation of the UNAM by Mexico’s military, and the persecution of dissidents, queers, and artists in Cuba’s early days of revolutionary institutionalization mark swiftly composed counterpoints to the hopes and the tensions of the former “events.” This course will focus on a cluster of major texts within three national literary traditions: Chilean, Mexican and Cuban. The time frame is basically from 1950 into today. In each context this time frame will allow us to question the impossible knot between the artist and the state, given the state’s over-exertions of power and art’s, especially literature’s, imperative to imagine the possibilities of a new citizenship. Neruda’s Canto General, Eltit’s E. Luminata, Bolaño’s By Night in Chile and possibly Lemebel’s My Tender Matador will be the first cluster. Rulfo’s Pedro Páramo, Paz’s The Labyrinth of Solitude and Bolaño’s Amulet will form the cluster of Mexican texts. And the Cuban literary grouping will be Cabrera-Infante’s Three Trapped Tigers, Arenas’ The Color of Summer and Ena Lucía Portela’s One Hundred Bottles. Films will be viewed/read with each section, and may include: one work by Chilean director, Raul Ruíz; The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, Rojo Amanecer, and Amores Perros; Soy Cuba and Suite Habana.

Course Materials/Textbooks for this course will be available at the Penn Book CENTER (130 S. 34th Street; (215) 222-7600).

Prof. Ellis' office hours for Spring 2011 are: T 10:30-11:30 and 3-4; R 10:30-11:30 at 313 Fisher-Bennett Hall


Roml-690
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
(See Course Timetable for time(s))

Roml 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

 

Fall 2010

Roml-512
History of Literary Theory
Prof. Rabate
(See Course Timetable for time(s))


Roml-690
Language Teaching/Learning
Prof. McMahon
(See Course Timetable for time(s))

Roml 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

Spring 2010

Romance Languages 121-680
Intensive Catalan Language
Prof. Espòsito
(See Course Timetable for time)

Pre-requisites: 200-level coursework in another Romance language or its equivalent.

This course provides an intensive introduction to the language of the Països Catalans, a geographical area that spans four countries and comprises over 9 million speakers who speak Catalan as either a first or second language. Working with authentic linguistic materials developed and presented within a uniquely Catalan cultural context, students will develop oral, listening, reading and writing skills in standard Central Catalan. When appropriate, we shall also discuss differences among the major regional varieties. The language of instruction is Catalan.

This course is recommended for students interested in studying in Barcelona.


Romance Languages 690-401
Language Teaching and Learning
Prof. McMahon
(See Course Timetable for time)

Roml 609 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching.   It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester.  The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition.   Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.  


Fall 2009

Romance Languages 512-401
History of Literary Theory
Prof. Jarosinski
(See timetable for time)

This course will traverse the history of aesthetics in order to understand the complexities of contemporary literary theory. In a sense, our subject is the fall-out of a paradox, virtuality, in its endless collisions with ideology. The syllabus will include such canonic figures as Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Augustine, Sidney, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Saussure, Benjamin, Foucault, Baudrillard, Derrida, Said, Irigaray, and Butler (in general, authors found on the Comparative Literature examination list in theory).


Romance Languages 690-401
Language Teaching and Learning
Prof. McMahon
(See timetable for time)

Romance Languages 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching.   It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester.  The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition.   Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

 

Spring 2009

Romance Languages 121-680
Intensive Catalan Language
Prof. Espòsito
(See Roster for time)

This course provides an intensive introduction to the language of the Països Catalans, a geographical area that spans four countries and comprises over 9 million speakers. Working with authentic linguistic materials developed and presented within a uniquely Catalan cultural context, students will develop oral, listening, reading and writing skills in standard Eastern Catalan. When appropriate, we shall also discuss differences among the major regional varieties, especially Valencian. The language of instruction is Catalan. This course is recommended for students interested in studying in Barcelona.

Pre-requisite(s): 200-level coursework in another Romance language or its equivalent.


Romance Languages 396-401
Caribbean Culture, Literature and Theory
Prof. de la Campa  
(See Roster for time)

This course will look at ways of conceptualizing, defining and situating Caribbean culture. Is it necessarily postcolonial? Is it a culture of resistance? Has its extraordinary multiplicity and historical diasporas found singular modes of representation? How does one approach its long list of great authors? What do they say about the Caribbean as such? Do they offer alternative views on the Americas? The course will be taught in English but will encompass writing from the major linguistic traditions that meet in the Caribbean, a place whose contours often reach beyond the main Caribbean Archipelago to South and North American sites such as Brazil, Colombia, New York, and Miami. We will look at major writers and theorists such as Frantz Fanon, Edouard Glissant, Sylvia Wynter, CLR James, Alejo Carpentier, Nicolas Guilleén, Antonio Benítez Rojo, Junot Diaz, Aime Cèsaire, V.S. Naipaul and Derek Walcott, among other s.

This course will be taught in English and is cross-listed with LALS 393, COML 396, and ENGL 270.


ROML 690-401
Language Teaching and Learning
Prof. McMahon
(See Roster for time)

ROML 690 is a course required of all Teaching Assistants in French, Italian, and Spanish in the second semester of their first year of teaching.   It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester.  The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition.   Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.

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This page last modified on: March 4, 2015
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