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Fall 2004

Russian Language Courses
Freshman Seminars

Russian Literature, Culture and History in English
Russian Literature, Culture and History in Russian (for non-native speakers)
Literacy in Russian (for Russian Speakers)
Russian Language and Literature offered through CGS
Slavic Courses
Graduate Level Courses
Eastern European

 

Russian Language Courses

RUSS 001 Elementary Russian I
001 MTWRF 10-11 Shardakova
002 MTWRF 3-4 Oleinichenko
This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read basic texts (signs, menus, news headlines) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes).

RUSS 003 Intermediate Russian I
001 MTWR 9-10 Shardakova
002 MTWR 5-6 Oleinichenko
This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement.

RUSS 107. Russian Outside the Classroom
Staff.

The goal of RUSS 107 is to provide students of Russian language and Russian heritage speakers with formalized opportunities to improve their conversation and comprehension skills while experiencing various aspects of Slavic culture. There will be no weekly assignments or readings, but all students will be expected to contribute at a level equivalent to their Russian-speaking abilities both in class and on the newsletter final project. The course consists of attending 2 out of 3 hrs/week of lunch-time conversation (W/Th 12-1:30) in addition to a tea-drinking hour in the department (F 4-5pm), film viewings, and a single outside cultural event (e.g., concert of Russian music at the Kimmel Center).

RUSS 311 Advanced Russian Conversation and Composition
Prerequisite(s): RUSS 004 or placement exam. Prior language experience is required.
001 MWF 2-3 Shardakova
This course develops students' skills in speaking and writing about topics in Russian literature, contemporary society, politics, and everyday life. Topics include women, work and family; sexuality; the economic situation; environmental problems; and life values. Materials include selected short stories by 19th and 20th century Russian authors, video-clips of interviews, excerpts from films, and articles from the Russian media. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary building.


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Freshman Seminars

RUSS 185 Dream and Nightmare in Fiction and Film
TR 3-4:20 Allen
This course is devoted to some of the most exciting modern films and novels from Latin America, Russia and Europe--dreams and nightmares that allow us to comprehend the "underground" of human experience. Our approach will be comparative, considering literary works in the context of film and the other arts, with special emphasis on several directors who laid the foundations of modern film: Fritz Lang, Dziga Vertov, and Sergei Eisenstein. Topics of discussion will include: creativity, deviant behavior, cultural dialogue, dissent, "delirious" modern cities (St. Petersburg, Prage, Rio de Janiero), and death. Works by: Dostoevsky, Gogol, Kafka, Proust, Lispector, Machado de Assis, Mario de Andrade, Saramago, Petrushevskaia, Pelevin and others.


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Russian Literature, Culture, and History in English Translation

RUSS 145 Russian Literature to 1870s
Gen Req III: Arts & Letters.
001 TR 3-4:30 Steiner
Major Russian writers in English translation: Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, early Tolstoy, and early Dostoevsky.

RUSS 190 Terrorism
Distribution II: History & Tradition.
001 MW 3-4:30 Todorov
This course studies the emergence of organized terrorism in nineteenth century Russia. It examines the philosophy of the terrorist struggle through its methods, causes, various codes, and manifestoes that defined its nature for the times to come. We critique intellectual movements such as nihilism, anarchism, and populism that inspired terrorism defining the political violence and disorder as beneficial acts. The issue of policing terrorism becomes central when we study a police experiment to infiltrate, delegitimize and ultimately neutralize the terrorist networks in late imperial Russia.


The discussions draw on the ideology and political efficacy of the conspiratorial mode of operation, terrorist tactics such as assassination and hostage-taking, the cell structure of the groups and underground incognito of the strikers, their maniacal self-denial, revoluntionary asceticism, underground mentality, faceless omnipotence, and other attributes-intensifiers of its mystique. We analyze the technology and phenomenology of terror that generate symmetrical disorganizing threats to any organized form of government and reveal the terrorist act as a sublime end as well as a lever for achieving practical causes. Our study traces the rapid proliferation of terrorism in the twentieth century and its impact on the public life in Western Europe, the Balkans, and America.

RUSS 220 (HIST 220) From the Other Shore: Russian and the West
Distribution: History and Tradition.
401 MW 3-4:30 Vaingurt
This course will explore the representations of the West in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth- century Russian literature and philosophy. We will consider the Russian visions of various events and aspects of Western political and social life - Revolutions, educational system, public executions, resorts, etc. - within the context of Russian intellectual history. We will examine how the images of the West reflect Russia's own cultural concerns, anticipations, and biases, as well as aesthetic preoccupations and interests of Russian writers. The discussion will include literary works by Karamzin, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Tolstoy, as well as non-fictional documents, such as travelers' letters, diaries, and historiosophical treatises of Russian Freemasons, Romantic and Positivist thinkers, and Russian social philosophers of the late Nineteenth century. A basic
knowledge of Nineteenth- century European history is desirable. The class will consist of lecture, discussion, short writing assignments, and two in-class tests.

RUSS 275 (FILM 253) Russian History in Film
Distribution III: Art & Letters.
401 MW 4:30-6 Todorov
This course draws on the fictional, drama and cinematic representation of the Russian history based on Russian as well as non Russian sources and interpretations. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, such as narrating, showing and reenacting historical events, personae and epochs justified by different, historically mutating ideological postulates and forms of national self-consciousness. Common stereotypes of picturing Russia from "foreign" perspectives draw special attention. The discussion involves the following themes and outstanding figures: the mighty autocrats Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great; the tragic ruler Boris Godunov; the brazen rebel and royal impostor Pugachov; the notorious Rasputin, his uncanny powers, sex-appeal, and court machinations; Lenin and the October Revolution; images of war; the times of construction and the times of collapse of the Soviet Colossus.

RUSS 299 Independent Study
000 see department for section numbers Staff

RUSS 399 Supervised Work
000 see department for section numbers Staff


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Russian Literature, Culture and History in
Russian (for non-native speakers)

RUSS 402 Pushkin
Distribution III: Arts & Letters.
401 TR 10:30-12 Steiner

The writer's lyrics, narrative poems, and drama.

RUSS 416 Business and Democracy in the New Russia
301 TR 1:30-3 Bourlatskya
This course is designed to familiarize students with contemporary Russian society, its historical background and its present political and economic structure, and to develop functional proficiency in speaking, writing, reading and listening. The course will focus on a variety of issues central to Russian society since the fall of the Soviet Union, including changing values, political parties and movements, the business climate and businessmen, various nationalities within Russia, women in the family and at work. This course is conducted in Russian and intended for students who do not speak Russian at home but have completed at least six semesters (or the equivalent) of Russian. Course materials will include interviews, articles, essays by leading Russian journalists and statesmen, and contemporary Russian movies.

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Literacy in Russian (for Russian Speakers)

RUSS 360 Literacy in Russian I: Likbez
Completion of 360-361 satisfies the language requirement.
001 TR 3-4:30 Verkholantsev
This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to gain (or improve) literacy in the language. If you cannot read and write in Russian or if you were only slightly exposed to Russian literacy – this course is for YOU! Topics will include an intensive introduction to the Russian writing system and grammar, focusing on materials and examples drawn from classic and contemporary Russian culture and social life. The other goal of this course is to acquire cultural literacy in Russian, that is, to become familiar with some of the main cultural idioms and concepts. If you have questions about your language abilities, please contact the instructor at juliaver@sas.upenn.edu.

RUSS 467 Classic Russian Literature Today
Distribution III: Arts and Letters (Pending Approval)
001 TR 1:30-3 Verkholantsev
This course will be of interest to Russian-speaking students with intermediate to advanced language competence, who seek to read and study classic Russian literature in the original, and improve their language skills to an academic level. Readings will consist of some of the greatest works of 19th and 20th-century authors, such as Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Bulgakov. Students will examine various forms and genres of literature, learn basic techniques of literary criticism, and explore the way literature is translated into film and other media. An additional focus of the course will be on examining the uses and interpretations of classic literature and elitist culture in contemporary Russian society. Observing the interplay of the "high" and "low" in Russian cultural tradition, students will develop methodology of cultural analysis.

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Russian Language and Literature Offered Through the College of General Studies

RUSS 001 Elementary Russian I
601 MW 6:30-9 Oleinichenko
This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read basic texts (signs, menus, news headlines) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes).


RUSS 003 Intermediate Russian I
601 TR 5-7 Oleinichenko
 
This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement.

RUSS 107 Russian Outside the Classroom
301 Time TBA


RUSS 196 Russian Short Story
Distribution III: Arts and Letters (Pending Approval)
601 M 6-9:30 Todorov

This course studies the development of 19th and 20th century Russian literature through one of its most distinct and highly recognized genres -- the short story. The readings include great masters of fiction such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, and others. The course presents the best works of short fiction and situates them in a literary process that contributes to the history of a larger cultural-political context.
The students learn about the historical formation, poetic virtue, and thematic characteristics of major narrative modes such as romanticism, utopia, realism, modernism, socialist realism, and post-modernism. We critique the strategic use of various devices of literary representation such as irony, absurd, satire, grotesque, anecdote, etc. Some of the main topics and issues include: culture of the duel; the role of chance; the riddle of death; anatomy of madness; imprisonment and survival; the pathologies of St. Petersburg; terror and homo sovieticos.

RUSS 426 Chekhov Stage and Screen
Cross-list: FILM 426
Distribution III: Arts & Letters.
601 T 5:30-8:30 Zubarev
“What’s so funny, Mr. Chekhov?” This question is often asked by critics and directors who still are puzzled with Chekhov’s definition of his four major plays as comedies. Traditionally, all of them are staged and directed as dramas, melodramas, or tragedies.

Should we cry or should we laugh at Chekhovian characters who commit suicide, or are killed, or simply cannot move to a better place of living? Is the laughable synonymous to comedy and the comic? Should any fatal outcome be considered tragic?
All these and other questions will be discussed during the course. The course is intended to provide the participants with a concept of dramatic genre that will assist them in approaching Chekhov’s plays as comedies.

In addition to reading Chekhov’s works, Russian and western productions and film adaptations of Chekhov’s works will be screened. Among them are, Vanya on 42nd Street with Andre Gregory, and Four Funny Families. Those who are interested will be welcome to perform and/or direct excerpts from Chekhov’s works.

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Slavic Courses

SLAV 399 Independent Study
000 see department for section numbers Staff

SLAV 501 Elementary Polish I
Offered through the Penn Language Center
680 MW 6-8 Sachs
Grammar and vocabulary study, reading, and practice in conversation, pronunciation, and writing on an elementary level, reading and translation of simplified Polish prose and poetry.

SLAV 530 Elementary Czech I
Offered through the Penn Language Center.
680 TR 6:30-8 Stejskal
An introduction to the fundamentals of the Czech language, acquisition of conversational, reading and writing skills.

SLAV 590 Elementary Ukranian I
Offered through the Penn Language Center.
680 MR 4-6:30 Rudnytsky



SLAV 592 Intermediate Ukrainian I
Offered through the Penn Language Center.
680 MR 6:30-8:30 Rudnytsky



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Graduate Level Courses

SLAV 655 (COML 654, HIST 656) History, Memory, Trauma
4 01 M 2-5 Platt

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Eastern European

EEUR 121 Elementary Hungarian I
Offered through Penn Language Center
680 TR 5:30-7 Mizsei
An introduction to the fundamentals of the Hungarian language, acquisition of conversational, readings and writing skills.

EEUR 123 Intermediate Hungarian I
Prerequisite(s): EEUR 121 or placement. Offered through Penn Language Center.
680 TR 4-5:30 Mizsei
Continuation of EEUR 121

EEUR 125 Advanced Hungarian I
Offered through the Penn Language Center.
680 TR 9-10:30 Mizsei
The basic aim is to enable students, independently or under the guidance of the teacher, to communicate in Hungarian and express their thoughts (orally or in writing) at an advanced level.

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