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Spring 2011

Russian Language

Ukrainian Language

Polish Language

Introductory and Survey Courses, Conducted in English

Intermediate and Advanced Seminars, Conducted in English

Intermediate and Advanced Seminars, Conducted in Russian

Courses for Students Who Speak Russian at Home

Graduate Level Courses

Courses Offered Through CLPS


Russian Language

RUSS002 Elementary Russian II
Prerequisite: RUSS 001 or placement exam

001 MTWRF 11am - 12pm Walker
002 MTWRF 3 - 4pm Oleinichenko
See "Courses Offered Through CLPS" below for additional times.

Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level.

RUSS004 Intermediate Russian II
Prior language study required
Prerequisite: RUSS 003 or placement exam

001 MWF 10am - 11pm, T 9:30am - 10:30am Korshunova
002 MTWR 5 - 6pm Oleinichenko
See "Courses Offered Through CLPS" below for additional times.

A continuation of RUSS003. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement.

RUSS312 Advanced Conversation & Composition II
Prior language study required
Prerequisite: RUSS311 or placement exam

TR 10:30am -12pm Thorstensson

Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring.

RUSS361 Literacy in Russian II
Prior language experience required

MWF 12pm -1pm Korshunova

This course is a continuation of RUSS360. In some cases, students who did not take RUSS360 but have basic reading and writing skills may be permitted to enroll with the instructor's permission. Students who complete RUSS361 with a passing grade will satisfy the Penn Language Requirement.

RUSS421 The Art and Life of Anton Chekhov
Conducted in Russian
Prerequisite(s): RUSS 312 or placement exam

TR 1:30 - 3pm Thorstensson

This course continues to develop students’ advanced skills in Russian. Language work will be combined with an examination of the life and creative work of one of Russia’s greatest writers, Anton Chekhov. Chekhov's prose and drama will be analyzed using the political, social and literary currents of his time as the background. This course will introduce students to the literary technique, poetics, and deeply humane worldview of Chekhov. Course materials will include short stories and drama, as well as some background readings. The advanced study of Russian language will have an emphasis on improving pronunciation, significantly expanding the vocabulary, mastering complicated grammatical and syntactic structures, and learning the basic conventions of academic discourse. As part of this course, students will be asked to write short response papers and some pieces of creative writing. Students will also produce a short film and stage a scene from a play. All class discussions and primary sources will be in Russian. Some secondary readings will be in English.

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Ukrainian Language

SLAV591 Elementary Ukrainian II
Offered through Penn Language Center

MW 5 - 7pm Rudnytzky L

SLAV593 Intermediate Ukrainian II
Offered through Penn Language Center
Prior Language Experience Required

MW 7 - 8:30pm Rudnytzky L

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Polish Language

SLAV502 ElementaryA Polish II
Offered through Penn Language Center

MW 6 - 8pm Wolski-Moskoff

Continuation of SLAV501.

SLAV506 Polish for Heritage Speakers II
Offered through Penn Language Center

MW 4 - 5:30pm Wolski-Moskoff

Continuation of SLAV505.

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Introductory and Survey Courses, Conducted in English

RUSS125 The Adultery Novel and Film Adaptation
All readings and lectures in English
Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes)
Cross-listing: COML127; GSOC125; CINE125
Offered through CLPS

T 5:30 - 8:30pm Kerman

The course examines a series of 19C and 20C novels (and a few short stories) about adultery, film adaptations of several of these novels, and several original adultery films in their own right. Our reading will teach us about novelistic traditions of the period in question, about the relationship of Russian literature to the European models to which it responded, as well as about adaptation and the implications of filmic vs. literary representation. Course readings may include: Laclos' “Dangerous Liaisons,” Flaubert's “Madame Bovary,” Tolstoy's “Anna Karenina,” Milan Kundera's “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” and other works. Films may include: Frears' “Dangerous Liaisons,” Vadim's “Dangerous Liaisons,” Nichols' “The Graduate,” Mikhalkov's “Dark Eyes,” and others. Students will apply various critical approaches in order to place adultery into its aesthetic, social and cultural context, including: sociological descriptions of modernity, Marxist examinations of family as a social and economic institution, Freudian/ Psychoanalytic interpretations of family life and transgressive sexuality, and Feminist work on the construction of gender.

RUSS155 Russian Literature after 1870
All readings and lectures in English
Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (Class of '10 and after)

TR 1:30 - 3pm Steiner

Major Russian writers in English translation: Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Babel, Solzhenitsyn, and others. 

RUSS165 Russian and Eastern European Film II
All readings and lectures in English
Distribution III, Arts & Letters (Class of '09 and prior)
Cross-listing: CINE265; SLAV165

MW 2 - 3:30pm Todorov

The purpose of this course is to present the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema in terms of film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and social and political reflex. We discuss major themes and issues such as: the invention of montage, the means of visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology and practices of social engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state in Russia and its subsequent installation in Eastern Europe after World War II; repression, resistance and conformity under such a system; legal and illegal desires; the nature of the authoritarian personality, the mind and the body of homo sovieticus; sexual and political transgression; treason and disgrace; public degradation and individual redemption; the profane and the sublime ends of human suffering and humiliation; the unmasking of the official "truth" as a general lie.

RUSS187 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film , Drama
All readings and lectures in English
Humanities and Social Sciences Sector (New Curriculum Only)
Cross-listing: HIST046

MW 2 - 3:30pm Thorstensson

This course covers 20C Russian cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a medium-length film, text or set of texts (novella, play, memoir, set of short stories) which opens up a single “scene” of social history—work, village, apartment, war, Gulag, and so on. Each of these cultural texts is ac­companied by a set of supplementary materials—historical readings, paintings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. The object of the course is to understand the social codes and rituals that informed twentieth-century Soviet life, and to apply this knowledge in interpreting literary texts, other cultural objects, and even historical and social documents (letters, memoranda, etc.). We will attempt to understand social history and cultural inter­pretation as separate disciplines—yet also as disciplines that can inform one another. In short: we will read the social history through culture, and read cultural works against the social history.

RUSS197 Madness and Madmen in Russian Culture
All readings and lectures in English
Humanities and Social Sciences Sector (New Curriculum Only)
Cross-listing: COML197

TR 1:30 - 3pm Walker

This course will explore the theme of madness in Russian literature and arts from the medieval period through the October Revolution of 1917. The discussion will include formative masterpieces by Russian writers (Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Bulgakov), painters (Repin, Vrubel, Filonov), composers (Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, and Stravinsky), and film-directors (Protazanov, Eisenstein), as well as non-fictional documents such as Russian medical, judicial, political, and philosophical treatises and essays on madness.

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Intermediate and Advanced Seminars, Conducted in English

RUSS202 Tolstoy
All readings and lectures in English
Benjamin Franklin Seminar

TR 1:30 - 3pm Verkholantsev

This course consists of three parts. The first, “How to read Tolstoy?” deals with Tolstoy’s artistic stimuli, favorite devices, and narrative strategies. The second, “Tolstoy at War,” explores the author’s provocative visions of war, gender, sex, art, social institutions, death, and religion. The emphasis is placed here on the role of a written word in Tolstoy’s search for truth and power. The third and the largest section is a close reading of Tolstoy’s masterwork “War and Peace” (1863-68) – a quintessence of both his artistic method and philosophical insights.

RUSS234 Medieval Russia: Origins of Russian Cultural Identity
All readings and lectures in English
Cross-Cultural Analysis (Class of '10 and after)
Cross-listing: HIST 219; COML235; SLAV517

TR 4:30 - 6pm Verkholantsev

This course offers an overview of the cultural history of Rus’ from its origins to the eighteenth century, a period which laid the foundation for the Russian Empire. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the evolution of the main cultural paradigms of Russian Orthodoxy viewed in a broader European context. Although this course is historical in content, it is also about modern Russia. The legacy of Medieval Rus’ is still referenced, often allegorically, in contemporary social and cultural discourse as the Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian societies attempt to reconstruct and reinterpret their histories. In this course, students learn that the study of the medieval cultural and political history explains many aspects of modern Russian society, its culture and mentality.

RUSS275 Russian History in Film
All readings and lectures in English
Cross-Cultural Analysis (Class of '10 and after)
Cross-listing: CINE275

MW 3:30 - 5pm Todorov

This course draws on fictional, dramatic and cinematic representations of Russian history based on Russian as well as non-Russian sources and interpretations. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, such as narrating, showing and reenacting historical events, personae and epochs justified by different, historically mutating ideological postulates and forms of national self-consciousness. Common stereotypes of picturing Russia from "foreign" perspectives draw special attention. The discussion involves the following themes and outstanding figures: the mighty autocrats Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great; the tragic ruler Boris Godunov; the brazen rebel and royal impostor Pugachev; the notorious Rasputin, his uncanny powers, sex-appeal, and court machinations; Lenin and the October Revolution; images of war; times of construction and times of collapse of the Soviet Colossus.

RUSS430 Ethnic Conflict in Film
All readings and lectures in English
Cross-Cultural Analysis (Class of '10 and after)
Cross-listing: CINE430
Offered through CLPS

M 5:30 - 8:30pm Todorov

Forms a part of the CLPS Masters in Liberal Arts Program. This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others.

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Intermediate and Advanced Seminars, Conducted in Russian

RUSS421 The Life and Art of Anton Chekhov
Conducted in Russian
Prerequisite(s): RUSS 312 or placement exam

TR 1:30 - 3pm Thorstensson

This course continues to develop students’ advanced skills in Russian. Language work will be combined with an examination of the life and creative work of one of Russia’s greatest writers, Anton Chekhov. Chekhov's prose and drama will be analyzed using the political, social and literary currents of his time as the background. This course will introduce students to the literary technique, poetics, and deeply humane worldview of Chekhov. Course materials will include short stories and drama, as well as some background readings. The advanced study of Russian language will have an emphasis on improving pronunciation, significantly expanding the vocabulary, mastering complicated grammatical and syntactic structures, and learning the basic conventions of academic discourse. As part of this course, students will be asked to write short response papers and some pieces of creative writing. Students will also produce a short film and stage a scene from a play. All class discussions and primary sources will be in Russian. Some secondary readings will be in English.

RUSS461 Twentieth Century Russian Literature: Fiction and Reality
Prerequisites: RUSS361 or comparable language competence.

TR 1:30 - 3pm Bourlatskaya

This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to improve their capabilities in formal and professional uses of the Russian language. Russian 461 introduces the major movements and figures of twentieth-century Russian literature and culture, works of modern Russian writers, and feature films. In studying the poetry of Mayakovsky, Block, and Pasternak, students will become familiar with the important literary movements of the Silver Age. The reality of the Soviet era will be examined in the works of Zamyatin, Babel, and Zoshchenko. There will be a brief survey of the development of Soviet cinema, including films of Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, and Mikhalkov. Literary trends in the later Soviet period will be seen in war stories, prison-camp literature, village prose, and the writings of female authors of that time.

RUSS485 Russian Poetics (formerly RUSS401/RUSS505)
Literatures of the World
Prerequisite: RUSS312, RUSS361 or comparable language competence. This course is open to all advanced students of Russian, including students who speak Russian at home.
Steiner

Introduction to the analysis of poetic texts, based on the works of Batyushkov, Lermontov, Tyutchev, Fet, Mandel’shtam, and others.

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Courses for Students Who Speak Russian at Home

RUSS361 Literacy in Russian II
Prior language experience required

MWF 12pm -1pm Korshunova

This course is a continuation of RUSS360. In some cases, students who did not take RUSS360 but have basic reading and writing skills may be permitted to enroll with the instructor's permission. Students who complete RUSS361 with a passing grade will satisfy the Penn Language Requirement.

RUSS461 Twentieth Century Russian Literature: Fiction and Reality
Prerequisites: RUSS361 or comparable language competence.

TR 1:30 - 3pm Bourlatskaya

This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to improve their capabilities in formal and professional uses of the Russian language. Russian 461 introduces the major movements and figures of twentieth-century Russian literature and culture, works of modern Russian writers, and feature films. In studying the poetry of Mayakovsky, Block, and Pasternak, students will become familiar with the important literary movements of the Silver Age. The reality of the Soviet era will be examined in the works of Zamyatin, Babel, and Zoshchenko. There will be a brief survey of the development of Soviet cinema, including films of Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, and Mikhalkov. Literary trends in the later Soviet period will be seen in war stories, prison-camp literature, village prose, and the writings of female authors of that time.

RUSS485 Russian Poetics (formerly RUSS401/RUSS505)
Literatures of the World
Prerequisite: RUSS312, RUSS361 or comparable language competence. This course is open to all advanced students of Russian, including students who speak Russian at home.
Steiner

Introduction to the analysis of poetic texts, based on the works of Batyushkov, Lermontov, Tyutchev, Fet, Mandel’shtam, and others.

 

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Graduate Level Courses

SLAV683 Modernisms Across Borders
All Readings and Lectures in English.
Cross-listed with COML683 and ENGL573

M 6:30 - 9:30pm Platt

Seminars on modernism are usually taught within a single geographic area, cultural tradition, period, language, medium, and disciplinary framework. Yet modernism was a border-crossing phenomenon, and it may productively be studied as such. A recent turn toward global and transnational paradigms is one of the few traits shared by modernist studies across multiple disciplines. "Modernism Across Borders" will take advantage of this commonality among diverse sites of inquiry, treating modernism as a transborder phenomenon while also probing the limitations and still-latent potential of such an approach. The course will be taught by a team of faculty members and is intended to appeal to students in a variety of programs. Each instructor will lead the seminar for two meetings and attend at least one other meeting. Each student will choose one instructor as adviser in course work that culminates in a paper presented in a conference at the end of the semester. Instructors include: Tsitsi Jaji, Priya Joshi (Temple), Kevin Platt (who will be present as moderator at all seminar meetings), Jean-Michel Rabaté and Paul Saint-Amour.

 

Courses Offered Through CLPS

RUSS002 Elementary Russian II
Non-CLPS Students need permission from CLPS. Prerequisite: RUSS 001 or placement exam.

MW 6:30 - 9pm Oleinichenko L

Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level.

RUSS004 Intermediate Russian II
Non-CLPS Students need permission from CLPS. Prerequisite: RUSS003 or placement exam.

TR 5 - 7pm Oleinichenko L

A continuation of RUSS003. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement.

RUSS125 The Adultery Novel and Film Adaptation
All readings and lectures in English
Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes)
Cross-listing: COML127; GSOC125; CINE125
Offered through CLPS

T 5:30 - 8:30pm Kerman

The course examines a series of 19C and 20C novels (and a few short stories) about adultery, film adaptations of several of these novels, and several original adultery films in their own right. Our reading will teach us about novelistic traditions of the period in question, about the relationship of Russian literature to the European models to which it responded, as well as about adaptation and the implications of filmic vs. literary representation. Course readings may include: Laclos' “Dangerous Liaisons,” Flaubert's “Madame Bovary,” Tolstoy's “Anna Karenina,” Milan Kundera's “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” and other works. Films may include: Frears' “Dangerous Liaisons,” Vadim's “Dangerous Liaisons,” Nichols' “The Graduate,” Mikhalkov's “Dark Eyes,” and others. Students will apply various critical approaches in order to place adultery into its aesthetic, social and cultural context, including: sociological descriptions of modernity, Marxist examinations of family as a social and economic institution, Freudian/ Psychoanalytic interpretations of family life and transgressive sexuality, and Feminist work on the construction of gender.

RUSS430 Ethnic Conflict in Film
All readings and lectures in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (Class of '10 and after)
Cross-listing: CINE430

M 5:30 - 8:30pm Todorov

Forms a part of the CGS Masters in Liberal Arts Program. This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others.

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