IOSCS

The International Organization for
Septuagint and Cognate Studies



The John William Wevers Prize in Septuagint Studies

The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies (IOSCS) offers an annual prize of $350 to be awarded to an outstanding paper in the field of Septuagint studies. The prize has been named in memory of John William Wevers to honor his many contributions to Septuagint studies.

The field of Septuagint studies is construed broadly, and a paper may focus on any aspect of the study of the Greek translation of the Jewish Scriptures.  The IOSCS wants to encourage the study of these translations by younger scholars, and eligibility is thus limited to advanced graduate students or recent Ph.D. recipients (4 years or less after receiving the degree).

The papers will be judged by a committee of IOSCS members, with the expectation that the winning paper be published in the Journal of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (JSCS).

The deadline for submitting papers for the current year is August 15. Papers should be between 4500-5500 words in length. Please submit the paper electronically to Dr. Karen Jobes: (karen.jobes@wheaton.edu).  If this is not possible, submissions may be mailed to her at the following mailing address.

Prof. Karen H. Jobes
Wheaton College and Graduate School
501 College Ave
Wheaton, IL 60187

Recent Prize Winners

The IOSCS is pleased to announce that Dr. Nesina Grütter (Abteilung Altes Testament, Theologische Fakultät der Universität Basel) has been awarded the 2016 John William Wevers prize for her paper, "A Tale of One City (Nah 3:8–9): A Text-Critical Solution for an Often Discussed Problem Provided by a Reading Preserved in the Septuagint.” Dr. Grütter completed her doctoral degree in Sept 2015.

The 2015 John William Wevers Prize in Septuagint Studies has been awarded to Dr. Christoffer Theis for his paper, “Θεκεμείνας und תַּחְפְּנֵיס in 1. Könige 11,19.” Dr. Theis holds a doctorate in Egyptology (2013) from the Ruprecht-Karls-University in Heidelberg, Germany. He is currently a doctoral student in Theology at the same school.

James R. Covington, a PhD student at the University of Chicago Divinity School, won the 2014 John William Wevers Prize in Septuagint Studies for his essay titled, “How to Do Things with God’s Words: Translation Technique of Divine Speech Acts in LXX Genesis.”

Ben Johnson won the 2013 John William Wevers Prize in Septuagint Studies for his essay titled, "Narrative Sensitivity and the Variation of Verb Tense in 1 Reigns 17:34-37."

Bradley John Marsh, Jr. won the 2011 John William Wevers Prize in Septuagint Studies. Jason Gile won the 2010 John William Wevers Prize in Septuagint Studies. No prize was awarded in 2012.